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Television Program Ratings

NEWS
May 19, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of controversy on Capitol Hill, the debate over the television industry's on-air parental guidelines today is moving to the viewers for whom they were intended: 300 families from Peoria, Ill., the city that is synonymous with Middle American values and market research, will rate the ratings in a televised, "Oprah"-style congressional hearing.
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NEWS
July 17, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a break with the White House, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt on Wednesday endorsed legislation calling on the television networks to reinstitute their old code of conduct, which included an early-evening family hour free of racy and violent programming. Broadcasters protested that their recent agreement to adopt a new system of rating television programs for sex, violence, foul language and suggestive dialogue should immunize them from such legislation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Feb. 29, 1996, after months of debate, the television industry announced at a White House press conference that it would begin applying movie-style ratings to TV shows to help parents screen out objectionable programming for their children. Part of the agreement was that there would be an "oversight monitoring board," composed of industry representatives who would review complaints about the ratings of specific shows to ensure consistency among the participants. The group has yet to meet.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | JANE HALL and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite threats of government reprisal, NBC reiterated its opposition Wednesday to the new parental warning labels that the rest of the television industry has put into effect. In a letter to Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, NBC President Bob Wright said the network will continue its use of age-based ratings categories without adding new labels denoting sex, coarse language, violence and suggestive dialogue.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the TV industry prepared to unveil its enhanced ratings for entertainment programming today, NBC came under fire in Congress on Tuesday for refusing to go along with the plan to add labels denoting sex, violence, coarse language and suggestive dialogue. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY
Sex. Violence. Protecting children. Morality, politics and culture. With all these enticing elements in the mix, why don't people seem to care about the V-chip? Perhaps because the debate, politicized from the get-go, has so seldom been waged in honest terms. This came to mind at a recent daylong seminar, "Filtering Out Sex and Violence," sponsored by the USC Law School.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parents' groups negotiating with the networks over TV programming guidelines have signaled a willingness to compromise on some issues, sources close to the talks said Thursday. Many of the groups--and some congressional representatives--have said in the past that the only TV ratings system they would endorse is one that provides symbols not only for sex, language and violence within each show, but also indicates the intensity of the depictions. The guidelines the industry began using Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of groups called People for Better TV is urging the Federal Communications Commission to hold public hearings to establish an independent system to rate the violence, sex and language in TV programs. According to a poll commissioned by the organization, which includes the National Organization for Women and the American Academy of Pediatrics, 84% of the public favors such independent ratings.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) warned the television industry Tuesday that, if it does not announce satisfactory voluntary changes in its current program-rating guidelines by early next week, he will push for Senate action on measures that could require a content-based system. "We need closure on this issue," McCain, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, said after meeting with representatives from the four major broadcast networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tim Collings admits feeling a bit like an expectant father on the eve of his creation, the V-chip, becoming available in the U.S., as new TV sets featuring the technology finally begin finding their way into American homes. An assistant professor at Technical University of British Columbia in Surrey, B.C.
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