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BUSINESS
November 5, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Admitting what he said were the shortcomings of his own TV networks, Ted Turner exhorted an audience of broadcasters to "strive for excellence" in programming, not just ratings and profits. "There's too much sleazy, stupid, violent stuff on television--that's why we're getting the V-chip," Turner told an an audience that included CBS President Peter Lund, Court TV President Stephen Brill and CBS anchorman Dan Rather.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the average TV viewer, it might be hard to comprehend a prime-time schedule that requires choosing between "NYPD Blue" and "Law & Order," sets quiz shows "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" and "Weakest Link" against each other in several time zones and places "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and its spinoff, "Angel," not only on different nights but on different channels. The best way to analyze decision-making in television these days, however, boils down to a simple phrase: Follow the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, there were almost none. This year, there are more. After months of intense heat about a noticeable lack of cultural diversity in prime-time casts for the 1999-2000 television season, the four major networks came to the annual New York upfront presentations with a range of new shows for the fall that include a greater degree of inclusion for minority actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The major networks have repeatedly used newsmagazines in recent years to put out fires and plug gaps in their prime-time lineups. Two weeks into the 1999-2000 TV season, some are wondering if they have gone to that particular well too often. Even with ratings for some new dramas cooling a bit last week, dramatic programs appear to be enjoying something of a resurgence this fall--in certain time slots at the apparent expense of newsmagazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new programming chief at Fox indicated Wednesday that he was not immediately planning a dramatic shift in direction for the network, but instead will try to bolster its existing prime-time schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC, which withdrew a potentially controversial episode last Saturday for its new spy series, "Under Cover," is yanking another possibly troublesome installment tonight, outraging the show's writer. Network executives said that the first postponement was in response to public sensitivities and anxieties because of the Persian Gulf War, since the episode dealt with an Iraq germ-laden missile plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1993 | JAMES ENDRST, THE HARTFORD COURANT
New year. New television shows. Not so many years ago, they used to call this time of year the second season. It was TV's time for midseason replacements, time-period tinkering, maybe even a re-introduction to an about-to-be-forgotten series--the fall after the fall, if you will. But that was before the networks got so insecure about their declining audience shares and so desperate for success that they got trigger-happy with their series.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The daytime business news offered for more than three decades by KWHY-TV is gone from the airwaves after a slow transition that paralleled the rise of Spanish-language programming in Los Angeles and digital media. For nearly 33 years, Los Angeles-based KWHY offered business news, analysis, a running ticker and the market commentaries of the late flamboyant stockbroker David Paul Kane on its Channel 22.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Imagine a television network that features shows about punk rock, aggressive skateboarding and the neighborhoods of East Los Angeles as well an Asian-style Hardy Boys series. Such a lineup may be a hard sell for cable TV, let alone a broadcast network. But a Santa Monica company is planning to take on television by offering those shows--plus 26 more--on the Internet starting in May. By focusing on a large number of niche audiences, Digital Entertainment Network Inc.
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