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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE
Two years ago, Aaron Spelling had an idea for a dramatic and, he thought, different television series about a divorced family as told through the eyes of a little boy. Besides voiceovers (later used by "The Wonder Years"), its main innovation was its format--two back-to-back half-hour shows, one about the boy's weekdays with his mother, the other about his weekends with his father. "I got to tell you," Spelling confided, "I was convinced we were going to sell it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990 | JOHN LIPPMAN, John Lippman is a Times staff writer.
On a spring day in 1977, Jeff Sagansky was eating lunch at Chadney's restaurant in Burbank with Michael Klein, a young programming executive at NBC. Sagansky was there to interview for a coveted slot in NBC's "associate" program, which picked young hotshots with no television background and put them on the fast track.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1989 | RICK DU BROW
The title was nice, but when Kim LeMasters was named president of CBS Entertainment two years ago, he was, in effect, being sent on a kamikaze mission. His assignment was clear: Save CBS' prime-time schedule, which in turn would pull up the rest of the network, restore its once-proud reputation and assure its future. No small task.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
VideoCipher and some of the nation's leading television programming services said Tuesday that they have joined forces to pull the plug on more than 600,000 satellite-dish "pirates." The San Diego-based division of General Instrument Corp. of Chicago announced the development of a new generation of television signal descramblers, the boxes satellite-dish owners must use to tune in to such pay TV services as HBO and Showtime and free basic cable channels as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN and SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
NBC may have Jane Curtin, KLOS-FM deejays Mark and Brian, talking dogs and characters from the "Archie" comics on its fall schedule. CBS is developing a batch of series featuring new stand-up comics and others based on the popular feature films as "Big," "Uncle Buck" and "Steel Magnolias." And ABC is frantically trying to create a compatible program to pair with its top-rated Sunday 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY Robert Smaus..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disney's movie "Dick Tracy" is big at the box office, but some local Asian and Latino groups are unhappy with Disney-owned KCAL Channel 9 for reviving a 29-year-old "Dick Tracy" cartoon series that they say contains ethnic and racial stereotypes. "When you exaggerate racial and ethnic mannerisms and characteristics, that is racism, no matter how you slice it," said Raul Ruiz, Chicano studies professor at Cal State Northridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2007 | From the Washington Post
The Smithsonian's controversial cable television programming will debut Wednesday, but right now only those with a specific satellite dish will be able to see it. Subscribers to DirecTV, one of two main satellite TV carriers, will have access to the 75 hours of programming from the Smithsonian Channel, produced in cooperation with Showtime Networks, the network announced Monday. Several groups objected to the contract because the Smithsonian signed over to Showtime semiexclusive rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | LEE MARGULIES
The so-called "reality" genre of television programming is proliferating not only in prime time but now in daytime too. ABC said Thursday that it will integrate a "reality" contest story line into its long-running soap opera "All My Children." The plan is to have two of the show's regular characters form a cosmetics company and begin a search for the sexiest man in America. The producers will then hold tryouts in various cities that will be taped for inclusion in the drama.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Court Says Phone Firms Can Enter Cable TV Business: A federal appeals court ruled that telephone companies may sell television programming directly to their customers. A unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court agreed with U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III, who last year declared the federal government's ban on sales an unconstitutional violation of free-speech rights.
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