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BUSINESS
August 9, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators on Thursday accelerated the nation's conversion to digital television when it gave manufacturers a 2007 deadline to equip most new sets with tuners that will offer viewers better-quality pictures and enhanced sound. The Federal Communications Commission's vote may raise the price of new TVs, possibly by as much as $200, even for those consumers who don't want digital TV.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Walt Disney Studios has agreed to a content license agreement with Sensio Technologies Inc. for the distribution of 3-D films via a new video-on-demand television service, the companies announced Monday. Sensio's on-demand rental service, called 3DGo, is to go live this month, though initially it will be limited to 22 Vizio television models that have both 3-D and Internet capabilities. Disney titles that will be available on 3DGo include the animated films "Brave" and "Frankenweenie.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Continuing its manufacturing buildup in the San Diego-Tijuana area, Sony Corp. of America announced Friday that it will invest an additional $100 million in its television plant here so that it can begin making its fast-selling 32-inch color sets here by next summer. Currently, all picture tubes for Sony's 32-inch color TVs sold in the United States are made in Japan, then assembled with consoles made in Tijuana.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1995 | From Reuters
Sony Corp. said Thursday that it is virtually stopping exports of domestically produced television sets and will focus on overseas production. It's a sign of the times for cost-conscious corporate Japan. Sony used to be a huge exporter of Japanese-made television sets when the nation's appliance makers helped equip the world's households with goods made on production lines at home. But the high yen and keen price competition have made overseas production a more attractive option.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1998 | GREG MILLER and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three giants from the cable television, computer software and banking industries agreed Tuesday to band together in developing a new service that will enable consumers to do their banking through their television sets. The deal, the first of many expected to emerge as companies scramble to take advantage of the convergence of computers and televisions, was struck early Tuesday morning by cable powerhouse Tele-Communications Inc., BankAmerica Corp. and software leader Intuit Corp.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2005 | From Reuters
U.S. regulators Thursday took action to accelerate the transition to digital television by moving up the date by which all new mid-sized TV sets must be able to view the high-quality signals. The Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted to move up by four months, to March 1, 2006, a deadline requiring digital reception by all television sets sold in the United States with 25-inch to 35-inch screens. The Consumer Electronics Assn. had asked for the new deadline.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1993 | MONICA YANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting this week, purchasers of new TV sets will have another technological feature available to them: Reading television will be as easy as a flip of the switch. A federal law that takes effect Thursday requires television manufacturers to equip all new sets 13 inches or larger with built-in capability to display captions, or subtitles, if the viewer wants them.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
Most American consumers will hardly notice the tariffs on Japanese imports imposed Friday. Although the tariffs could double the prices of the goods, which include color television sets, power hand tools and small computers, it is likely that the Japanese manufacturers will simply stop shipments here while the sanctions are in effect.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN, Times Staff Writer
In the kind of deal that puzzles most Americans and arouses others to near apoplexy, General Electric is selling its consumer electronics division to the Thomson company of France, and getting out of the business of making television sets in the United States. That seems, in a sense, to be selling part of America's technological birthright, because GE's TV set business includes that of the old RCA company acquired by GE last year.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
Americans falling short of the daily average of three hours spent watching TV have a new opportunity to catch up. Starting today, a San Francisco marketer is sending models out in public in T-shirts with built-in television sets. "People of my generation and younger are so used to moving images on TV that if it's not a moving image, it doesn't move them," said 30-year-old pitchman Adam Hollander, who created the Adver-Wear shirts.
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