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BUSINESS
October 6, 1995 | From Reuters
Sony Corp. said Thursday that it is virtually stopping exports of domestically produced television sets and will focus on overseas production. It's a sign of the times for cost-conscious corporate Japan. Sony used to be a huge exporter of Japanese-made television sets when the nation's appliance makers helped equip the world's households with goods made on production lines at home. But the high yen and keen price competition have made overseas production a more attractive option.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 1998 | GREG MILLER and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three giants from the cable television, computer software and banking industries agreed Tuesday to band together in developing a new service that will enable consumers to do their banking through their television sets. The deal, the first of many expected to emerge as companies scramble to take advantage of the convergence of computers and televisions, was struck early Tuesday morning by cable powerhouse Tele-Communications Inc., BankAmerica Corp. and software leader Intuit Corp.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2005 | From Reuters
U.S. regulators Thursday took action to accelerate the transition to digital television by moving up the date by which all new mid-sized TV sets must be able to view the high-quality signals. The Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted to move up by four months, to March 1, 2006, a deadline requiring digital reception by all television sets sold in the United States with 25-inch to 35-inch screens. The Consumer Electronics Assn. had asked for the new deadline.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1993 | MONICA YANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting this week, purchasers of new TV sets will have another technological feature available to them: Reading television will be as easy as a flip of the switch. A federal law that takes effect Thursday requires television manufacturers to equip all new sets 13 inches or larger with built-in capability to display captions, or subtitles, if the viewer wants them.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
Most American consumers will hardly notice the tariffs on Japanese imports imposed Friday. Although the tariffs could double the prices of the goods, which include color television sets, power hand tools and small computers, it is likely that the Japanese manufacturers will simply stop shipments here while the sanctions are in effect.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LG this week confirmed that its Smart TV sets are collecting information on users' viewing habits even when they have not been authorized to do so. The South Korean tech company's Smart TVs include a feature that gathers information on what users are watching and sends it back to LG in order to come up with recommendations for other content that they might like. LG gives users the option of turning the feature off, but LG said it has verified that its TVs continue to collect that information even if users opt out. LG looked into the issue after it was brought to its attention by a tech-savvy user . PHOTOS: TopĀ 10 ways to take advantage of the 'sharing economy' "LG regrets any concerns these reports may have caused and will continue to strive to meet the expectations of all our customers and the public," the company said in a statement.
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
It was a curious thing when President Reagan decided on Monday to lift $51 million in punitive tariffs on Japanese imports of 20-inch color television sets. Among all the varied responses to the announcement, there was not one sigh of relief.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Zenith, the only U.S. maker of television sets, and AT&T said Tuesday that they have teamed up to develop a high-definition television system. Addressing concerns that foreign competitors are winning the race to develop HDTV equipment, Zenith Chairman Jerry Pearlman predicted that the partnership would yield "winning American technology" that will "allow the U.S. to leapfrog the Japanese and Europeans."
BUSINESS
December 1, 1993 | From Reuters
Within three years, TV viewers may be able to dump cable boxes and replace them with specially equipped televisions and video recorders, if government rules to be proposed today are adopted. The Federal Communications Commission's proposals would require that cable boxes be replaced by small, paperback book-sized cartridges that snap into newly designed television sets and videocassette recorders.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legislation that would make closed-captioning technology a required part of most new televisions sold in America is winning support in and out of Congress. That's good news for the estimated 24 million deaf or hearing-impaired U.S. citizens, who now must rely on costly closed-caption decoding devices or, as is more common, view their favorite programs hearing only muted mumbles or nothing at all.
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