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BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abandoning a three-year campaign, CBS said Monday that it is throwing in the towel on efforts to collect payments from local cable systems for permission to carry its TV signal. The move effectively puts the nail in the coffin of a broadcast industry effort to charge cable operators to carry the programming of television stations. CBS' surrender also means the network will have to shelve indefinitely its plans to launch a new cable TV channel dedicated to news and public affairs.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday narrowed the field of contestants in the high-stakes battle for the right to market a high-definition television transmission system in the United States. The FCC voted to consider only HDTV systems that will not require an extra "augmentation" channel of scarce TV space in order to provide the crystal-clear pictures and compact-disc-quality sound that the new system promises.
SPORTS
September 5, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NFL announced Tuesday that its decision to scramble its fall telecasts is being "reviewed" by the league and the television networks. "In light of everything that's happened, we need to review the situation," said Greg Aiello, the NFL's director of communications. "We're reviewing the scrambling issue with the networks, and no games will be scrambled until that review is completed."
BUSINESS
September 6, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Rumbling toward the Carolina coast, Tropical Storm Hanna may force the delay of the nation's first test of the digital television conversion. Wilmington, N.C., is scheduled to become the first media market to permanently switch to digital TV signals at noon Monday. But the storm was approaching hurricane strength Friday and was expected to make landfall just south of Wilmington early today. That's causing angst for broadcasters at the region's five commercial TV stations. Broadcasters and Federal Communications Commission officials discussed the situation in two conference calls this week and plan to have another conversation Sunday morning to decide whether they will postpone the digital conversion.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court said Tuesday that it will rule on whether the First Amendment forbids the government from determining what channels a cable company must carry. At issue is the 1992 Cable TV Act, in which Congress generally required local cable operators to carry the signals of all the broadcast stations in their area. The law was passed in response to consumers' anger over rising rates and spotty service.
SPORTS
September 6, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norman Lebovitz, a San Diego restaurateur who describes himself as "just the average fan," was flown to New York Wednesday by one of the NFL's biggest advertisers to meet with network executives about the scrambling of televised games. CBS and NBC later issued statements confirming that plans to scramble NFL broadcasts have been suspended, at least for the foreseeable future.
SPORTS
September 7, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY
Saying, "The networks gave me what I wanted," Norman Lebovitz, the San Diego restaurateur who launched a boycott of two major beer companies as a way of opposing the scrambling of NFL telecasts, announced Thursday that the boycott is over. "The networks assured me and my attorney in private meetings (Wednesday) that there will be no scrambling this season," Lebovitz said. Lebovitz, said he made his decision after talking with brewery executives Thursday.
SPORTS
August 26, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowell Ganz may be the essence of the contemporary urban sports fan. A Hollywood screenwriter from New York, he lives in Los Angeles, where, via his home satellite dish, he spends fall Sundays watching his favorite entry in the NFL, the New York Giants. Ganz is passionate about sports and obsessive about certain teams, almost all of which play in New York. He will tell you without apology that, except for the Lakers, he has no interest in local teams. But come Sept.
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