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BUSINESS
November 8, 2002 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The shuttered KWHY television studios in Hollywood have been purchased by a Los Angeles developer who plans to turn them into stores and possibly apartments. Champion Development Group bought the blighted five-building campus at the northeast corner of Sunset Boulevard and St. Andrews Place for $2.4 million and plans to spend an additional $5 million in upgrades.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The hard-fought battle over who would run Warner Bros. ended months ago, but there may be more casualties. Jeff Robinov, head of Warner Bros.' movie unit, is planning to exit the company, according to several people at the studio who asked not to be identified because they were discussing internal personnel matters. Robinov's expected departure comes less than a month after the resignation of Bruce Rosenblum, chief of Warner Bros. Television Group. Both Robinov and Rosenblum lost the fight to succeed Barry Meyer as chairman and chief executive of Hollywood's largest film and television studio.
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BUSINESS
June 23, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Contract negotiations between two actors unions and movie and television studios continued and might run through the weekend as both sides try to come to terms before the agreement expires July 1. The negotiating committees will continue talks "with no breaks in negotiations scheduled at this time, in an effort to meet the June 30 deadline," the unions and studios said in a prepared statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
John D. Silva was the chief engineer for KTLA-TV in 1958 when he outfitted a helicopter with a TV camera and changed television news coverage forever. He turned a rented Bell helicopter into the Telecopter, essentially a flying TV studio. The first of its kind, it put Channel 5 news at the forefront of live aerial coverage of major events like parades, fires, earthquakes and massive freeway snarls. Hundreds of televised car chases later, Silva's invention is a staple of local television news stations, along with the mobile unit he also had a hand in developing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2002 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man shot himself after a four-hour standoff Tuesday at the CBS television studios, where he aimed a gun at an employee and forced an evacuation after bursting into the building, authorities said. The 29-year-old man was taken to a hospital at 9:15 p.m. with a single gunshot to the chest. He was listed in critical condition at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center late Tuesday.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1997 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News Corp. has launched a third television production studio to supply its growing number of distribution channels, which include the Fox broadcast network, the nation's largest TV station group, five cable services and scores of international channels. The new structure is believed to be the first of its kind within the major-studio structure.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1997 | JULIA SCHEERES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After searching for several years and evaluating 63 sites around Los Angeles, KABC-TV Channel 7 Monday announced plans to move its television studios to Glendale. The future site will be near the interchange of Interstate 5 and California 134, in the Grand Central Business Centre owned by ABC's parent corporation, the Walt Disney Co. "We're currently in an old facility occupying 60,000 square feet spread out over seven buildings," said Arnold J. Kleiner, president and general manager of KABC.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viewers of Television Azteca, Mexico's newest television network, woke up one morning early this month to see a live interview with Maria Eugenia Ramirez Arauz, a fugitive from justice. On the screen, Ramirez Arauz, a suspected conspirator in an audacious political assassination, smoked nervously and glanced around the studio as two newscasters peppered her with questions, sometimes interrupting each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Everywhere you look there's a Hollywood this or a Hollywood that. There's North Hollywood (home of the television academy) and Hollywood North (Toronto and its once-feared "runaway" studio facilities). There's East Hollywood (home of the old Monogram studios, now public television's KCET) and Hollywood East, also known as Hollywood on the Hudson (New York's Astoria studios) or Hollywood on the Potomac (anywhere in D.C.).
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lit up at night, the new world headquarters of Trinity Broadcasting Network in Costa Mesa looks like a cross between Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty castle and a Middle Eastern palace. Inside, a sweeping brass and marble staircase leads to a 15-foot-tall statue of Michael the Archangel stomping the head of Satan. Behind is a high-definition video theater with a 48-channel sound system and a state-of-the-art television studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Reality TV star and billionaire developer Donald Trump is looking to buttress his show business credentials by building a film and television studio in Florida. Trump wants to develop a giant production facility in south Miami- Dade County on 800 acres near the Homestead Air Reserve Base. Dubbed Trump Studio City, the complex would be twice as large as Universal Studios in Orlando and employ thousands, Michael Cohen, Trump's legal counsel, told county commissioners in a meeting Tuesday.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
A coalition composed of movie and television studios, cable and phone companies and record labels are launching a wide-ranging initiative aimed at cracking down on Internet piracy. The effort brings together Internet service providers — companies that are the gatekeepers to the worldwide Web — and content creators in the fight against the theft of intellectual property. It will be overseen by the newly created Center for Copyright Information, whose backers include the Motion Picture Assn.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
More popular movies helped boost Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.'s revenue in the fiscal year that ended March 31, but higher costs caused its net loss to more than double. The Santa Monica film and television studio reported revenue of $1.8 billion, up 6% from the previous fiscal year, and a net loss of $53.6 million. The revenue was in line with an estimate the company issued this month, while the net loss came in lower than expected. The studio's motion picture group had the biggest boost, with revenue up 10% to $1.23 billion thanks to a slate with more big-budgeted releases, including the action hit "The Expendables" and the low-budget horror success "The Last Exorcism" as well as flops such as the romantic comedy "Killers" and the Russell Crowe drama "The Next Three Days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Jackie Cooper, whose tousled blond hair, pouty lower lip and ability to cry on camera helped make him one of the top child stars of the 1930s in films such as "Skippy" and "The Champ," has died. He was 88. Cooper, who grew up to become a successful TV star in the 1950s, a top television studio executive in the '60s and an Emmy Award-winning director in the '70s, died Tuesday at a skilled nursing facility in Santa Monica after a brief illness, said his son John. A former "Our Gang" cast member who began his Hollywood career as an extra in silent movies at age 3, Cooper shot to stardom at 8 playing the title role in "Skippy," the 1931 film based on a popular comic strip about a health inspector's son and his ragamuffin pal, Sooky.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles
Facing challenging film economics, Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. is launching a new initiative to release up to 10 low-budget movies a year costing less than $2 million each to produce. Chief Executive Jon Feltheimer announced the plans in a conference call with analysts Thursday to discuss the Santa Monica film and television studio's financial performance in the quarter that ended Dec. 31. Feltheimer said the low-cost endeavor was one of the key steps the studio was taking to deal with a "motion picture environment facing head winds.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
A good August ended on a sour note for Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. After releasing back to back box-office hits "The Expendables" and "The Last Exorcism" and scoring a best drama Emmy for its cable television series "Mad Men" for a third consecutive year, Lions Gate was surprised Tuesday when its largest shareholder, Carl Icahn, raised his bid to take over the movie and TV studio's outstanding shares to $7.50 a share from $6.50. The increased offer makes it more difficult to fend off the activist investor in his aggressive fight for control of the studio.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2010 | By Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
In a bare-knuckles maneuver that's audacious even by Hollywood standards, corporate raider Carl Icahn is moving closer to seizing more control of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. The stage is now set for the activist investor to launch his proxy war to win control of Lions Gate's board. By Wednesday evening, Icahn was on the verge of becoming the largest shareholder in the Santa Monica film and TV studio. Shortly before the 5 p.m. Pacific time expiration of his $7-a-share tender offer, Icahn had received 12.5% of Lions Gate's outstanding shares, which would give him at least a 31% stake, according to two people familiar with the matter.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2010 | By Ben Fritz and Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Media entrepreneur and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said Thursday that he would probably tender his shares of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. to Carl Icahn, pushing the activist investor closer to taking control of the Santa Monica movie and TV studio. "I really think I'm going to tender, and I will have a conversation with them [Lions Gate management] today," Cuban said on the CNBC program "Strategy Session." When asked why he would tender his shares, Cuban said, "I have my reasons [that]
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