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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990
Howard Rosenberg's May 19 column, "TV: A Witness for the Execution?," failed to mention an important factor in the issue of whether executions should be televised: entertainment. People are entertained by savagery and death, and television is an entertainment medium. Boxing matches. Ice hockey. Racing car crashes. You name it. There is an audience, a sizable audience, for mayhem, cruelty and violence. Including executions. Bring them on. I'll be the first to tune in. LANNY R. MIDDINGS San Ramon, Calif.
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NEWS
August 25, 1985
"TV Snubs Incense Birth Control Campaigners--Major Television Outlets Have Declined to Air Controversial Messages" by Elizabeth Mehren (Aug. 2)--the title describes the issue. Interestingly, networks air programs with sexy bedroom scenes without showing the results--perhaps unwanted pregnancy. Explicit sex on TV influences the youth; however, networks refuse to take responsibility. Among the developed countries, our unintended pregnancy rate is among the highest at more than 3 million a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990
Perhaps the solution would be to require TV executives to look at their shows two hours a week in the company of their 9-to-15-year-old children or grandchildren. Their networks might change policies. JOHN A. WOODWARD III, Los Angeles
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Can Ikea's new Uppleva system solve our collective television problem? For too long we've been juggling too many remote controls, shoving unsightly tangles of electric cords behind bookshelves, and precariously stacking video game players on top of Blu-ray players on top of cable boxes. It's not pretty. It's not convenient. And it's not easy. But now Ikea has announced a new product designed to clear the clutter associated with watching television. They call it Uppleva.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Singer Has HIV: Holly Johnson, former lead singer of the defunct pop group Frankie Goes to Hollywood, has the HIV virus that causes AIDS, the Times of London reported. The group's biggest hit, "Relax," urged gays to take pride in their sexuality and Johnson, a homosexual, said the virus would not force him to live a closeted lifestyle. "I've had some moments of black despair but it's a lot, lot worse for some people," Johnson, 33, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
It is Sunday afternoon. My husband is in the other room watching the Giants-49ers game. I'm here in the kitchen watching the best competitor to football--the war game. I and the rest of the world are actually watching the war on television. It's insanity! Gen. H. Norman Schwartzkopf (commander of allied forces) is interviewed by CNN. He looks and sounds like a football coach. Macho men are pitting their asinine virilities against one another. As I watch this obscene war game I can feel myself becoming desensitized to what is going on. There are people under those fireworks displays!
NEWS
April 19, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A 9-year-old boy saved his drowning sister by administering CPR -- which, he says, he learned by watching television. Tristin Saghin and his family were visiting his grandmother in Mesa, Ariz., when his grandmother and mother suddenly realized that the 2-year-old girl had gone missing. They ran outside and found her floating in the swimming pool. As his elders called for help, Tristin began performing chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth on the toddler, according to the ABC15 news report . "I knew what I was doing," he is reported to have said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1993
Let me get this straight: According to a Los Angeles Times Poll, four our of five Americans--roughly the same percentage of Americans who wholeheartedly supported our recent slaughter of over 200,000 Iraqis--believe that television is at the root of our society's violent behavior. There is no difference between our drive-by bombing of Iraq in retaliation for their scheme against former President Bush and a drive-by shooting for similar motivation. Look in the mirror, folks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
On the afternoon of Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, the turgid melodrama of "As the World Turns" was suddenly interrupted by grave news from the real world. In Dallas, three shots had been fired at President John F. Kennedy's motorcade. Fifty-eight minutes later, a visibly moved Walter Cronkite would confirm the unthinkable: The president was dead. For the ensuing three days, Americans gathered around their televisions in a rite of collective mourning as the three broadcast networks abandoned their regularly scheduled programming to provide uninterrupted news coverage.
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