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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2000
The television rankings chart will appear in the Friday Calendar section.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
On the afternoon of Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, the turgid melodrama of "As the World Turns" was suddenly interrupted by grave news from the real world. In Dallas, three shots had been fired at President John F. Kennedy's motorcade. Fifty-eight minutes later, a visibly moved Walter Cronkite would confirm the unthinkable: The president was dead. For the ensuing three days, Americans gathered around their televisions in a rite of collective mourning as the three broadcast networks abandoned their regularly scheduled programming to provide uninterrupted news coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1993
In her Column Right, "TV Violence Rouses the Old Itch to Censor" (July 8), Virginia I. Postrel mentions my name as one of the prominent critics of the media who "all seek to use the official violence of government power to wipe out ideas and images they do not like." This completely misrepresents my position, since I have always been opposed to governmental interference in the popular culture. My recent book, "Hollywood vs. America," includes a chapter called "The Censorship Temptation," in which I unequivocally declare: "Official censorship is not the answer, and attempts to move in that direction will always prove counterproductive."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2004 | John Rice, Associated Press
The U.S. government believes Cubans should see more of America on television, and for years, Cubans have been happily complying -- cobbling together clandestine satellite systems to pick up everything from the World Series to soap operas. No longer. Most of these systems have been silenced -- not by Fidel Castro but by an American company's war on TV piracy.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Two recent studies linking childhood television viewing to antisocial behavior and criminal acts as adults are prompting some pediatricians to call for a national boob tube intervention. A commentary published alongside the studies in the journal Pediatrics on Monday lamented the fact that most parents have failed to limit their children's television viewing to no more than one or two hours a day -- a recommendation made by the American Academy of Pediatrics. On average, preschool-age children in the United States spend 4.4 hours per day in front of the television, either at home or in daycare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
CBS, NBC, ABC--who needs them when you've got CNN? STANLEY M. BENSKIN Morro Bay
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Television" reminds you of television. It promises a lot and delivers far less. That verdict is based on the initial three segments of the eight-part PBS series premiering tonight (8 p.m. on Channels 28, 58 and 15, 9 p.m. on Channel 50, 10 p.m. on Channel 24). A co-production of KCET Channel 28 and WNET in New York, the eight hours were inspired by and utilize a 13-hour series by Britain's Granada Television, also titled "Television."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990
Howard Rosenberg's May 19 column, "TV: A Witness for the Execution?," failed to mention an important factor in the issue of whether executions should be televised: entertainment. People are entertained by savagery and death, and television is an entertainment medium. Boxing matches. Ice hockey. Racing car crashes. You name it. There is an audience, a sizable audience, for mayhem, cruelty and violence. Including executions. Bring them on. I'll be the first to tune in. LANNY R. MIDDINGS San Ramon, Calif.
NEWS
August 25, 1985
"TV Snubs Incense Birth Control Campaigners--Major Television Outlets Have Declined to Air Controversial Messages" by Elizabeth Mehren (Aug. 2)--the title describes the issue. Interestingly, networks air programs with sexy bedroom scenes without showing the results--perhaps unwanted pregnancy. Explicit sex on TV influences the youth; however, networks refuse to take responsibility. Among the developed countries, our unintended pregnancy rate is among the highest at more than 3 million a year.
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