Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTelly Savalas
IN THE NEWS

Telly Savalas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Telly Savalas, the bald-headed actor who played movie villains but gained his most fame as a hard-boiled, lollipop-loving New York City detective in the 1970s television series "Kojak," died Saturday of prostate cancer. Savalas was surrounded by his family when he died in his sleep at the suite he kept at the Sheraton-Universal Hotel in Universal City, said Mike Mamakos, his spokesman and longtime friend. It was the day after his 70th birthday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014
John Cacavas Composer's career was helped by Telly Savalas John Cacavas, 83, a composer, arranger and conductor who parlayed his friendship with actor Telly Savalas into a prolific career scoring music for film and television, including a theme to "Kojak," died Jan. 28 at his home in Beverly Hills, his family announced. He had been in declining health. While working in London in the early 1970s, Cacavas met Savalas. He agreed to produce an album for the actor, who promised to help the composer get into the film business.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Taylor is designing jewelry for Avon. She's not hunched over a work bench with a jeweler's loupe screwed to her eye, but she's directing those who are. Her big hands-on moment will come when the money starts rolling in. Taylor is the latest in a long line of famous names to become a fashion label. Occasionally the star and the product are a match made in merchandising heaven. Mikhail Baryshnikov "designs" dance wear and Jaclyn Smith "designs" clothing and accessories for Kmart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Ninety-one-year-old Constantine Socrates Savalas stepped on the stage at Los Angeles Valley College's music recital hall and surveyed the younger faces before him. "I stand before you as a witness to the destruction of ships and destroyers at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941," said Savalas, briefly describing the surprise attack by the Japanese that killed 2,459 Americans and drew this country into World War II. PHOTOS: A date which will...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004
'Who loves ya?' Ving Rhames will star in a TV movie based on "Kojak," the 1970s police drama that starred Telly Savalas as a police lieutenant.
NEWS
July 26, 1988
Christina Savalas; Artist, Telly Savalas' Mother Christina Savalas, 84, an artist whose impressionistic portraits have been exhibited in several cities across the nation, according to a spokesman for her son, actor Telly Savalas. Born in Sparta, Greece, she emigrated to New York as a teen-ager where she married another Greek immigrant, Nicholas Savalas. He died 25 years ago. In Burbank on Saturday of heart failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The executive producers of "Return to the Titanic . . . Live," Doug Llewelyn and John Joselyn, denied charges this week that the ship's safe opened by Telly Savalas during last week's nationally syndicated live broadcast was actually empty when first retrieved from the ocean floor. The two were responding to charges made to the Associated Press by Hubert Henrotte, president of Sygma photo agency, which participated in last summer's salvage operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
For decades, Mike Silverman touted himself as "the Realtor to the stars," drawing swoons from the news media here and abroad both for his movie-star clientele and his movie-star looks. In his case, the nickname wasn't just a publicist's creation but a reflection of star-studded fact. He had catered to a seemingly endless string of A-list celebrities that started, according to Silverman, when he sold Frank Sinatra's house to Cary Grant. Silverman, who retired in 2001, died April 17 of congestive heart failure at his vacation home in Bellingham, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989
Gideon Kanner's arguments in The Times' Point/Counterpoint article (June 25) seem to say private property rights are always paramount over any public good or necessity. Mr. Kanner's position would lead us to believe any developer could construct a junkyard next to Carpenter Avenue Elementary School or a high-rise Century City-like tower on the site where Thrifty Drug now stands. The city of Los Angeles has placed many planning controls on development through the years, including a three-story height moratorium on Ventura Boulevard, increased parking ratios for movie theaters, reduced height for apartments next to single-family homes, and transportation fees to mitigate traffic increases due to commercial development.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1989 | IRV LETOFSKY
Telly Savalas had a hit TV series as an intrepid investigator. In a new movie for the USA cable network, "The Hollywood Detective" (tonight at 9), he plays an actor who had a hit TV series as an intrepid investigator. At one point, he gets beat up. Savalas, with a nose much like a small potato, fears that it's broken. Tenderly, he squeezes it and puffs it up and whines, "I love my nose." This assignment steps on Kojak and grinds him into the ground. It's a comic turn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
For decades, Mike Silverman touted himself as "the Realtor to the stars," drawing swoons from the news media here and abroad both for his movie-star clientele and his movie-star looks. In his case, the nickname wasn't just a publicist's creation but a reflection of star-studded fact. He had catered to a seemingly endless string of A-list celebrities that started, according to Silverman, when he sold Frank Sinatra's house to Cary Grant. Silverman, who retired in 2001, died April 17 of congestive heart failure at his vacation home in Bellingham, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | Susan King
SUSPENSE master Mario Bava is known for showing a fair amount of violence in his films, but "The Howling" helmer Joe Dante has a particularly vivid and grisly association with the late Italian director. A fan since he was 14, a young Dante would venture into Philadelphia's sleaziest grindhouse movie theaters to catch the occasional Bava film. "There was one picture called 'What' that was made as 'The Whip and the Body,' " the "Gremlins" director recalls. "There's a scene where Christopher Lee is beating Daliah Lavi with a whip on a beach at sunset.
SPORTS
July 20, 2005 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, when Bill Koch was 5, he trailed his grandfather to tracks all over California to see a 2-year-old gelding called Telly's Pop run. Young Koch was here in 1975 when Telly's Pop, owned by actor Telly Savalas and movie producer Howard W. Koch, won the Del Mar Futurity. "Has it been that long?" Bill Koch said. "Well, I'm 35, so I guess it has been."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004
'Who loves ya?' Ving Rhames will star in a TV movie based on "Kojak," the 1970s police drama that starred Telly Savalas as a police lieutenant.
SPORTS
February 25, 2001 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was 1975, long before Snow Chief, and trainer Mel Stute was in trouble. His horses had a bad case of the slows and he hadn't cashed a juicy bet in months. What Mel Stute had was a bad case of the shorts. As the bills piled up, Stute had this unraced horse at a farm someplace, an unattractive 2-year-old that he had bred, but the last bid the horse had brought at an auction was $4,000, and Stute needed a little more than that. So he bought him back. Thinking that Howard W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1994
Actor Telly Savalas is still alive on a 747 en route to New York from LAX, in my mind (" 'Kojak' Star Telly Savalas Dies at 70," Jan. 23). A few years ago, while traveling first class with his wife and new baby, Savalas' credit card stubbornly refused to trigger a call from the in-flight phone behind the cockpit. Noting his quiet frustration, I tried my credit card. It did work. So I turned the phone over him. "Hello, Mama! It's Telly!" he gushed. I walked away. Later, when I returned to make a call myself, Savalas quietly extended a clenched fist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1994 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday mornings, Telly Savalas would hang around the bar at the Sheraton-Universal Hotel, sipping coffee, still in his slippers, watching football games on television. "What's the line on this one?" someone would ask. Savalas would shrug. "I got 6 1/2." Forget the lollipops and the "Who loves ya, baby?" At this Universal City hotel, Savalas was one of the guys. A regular. He kept a third-floor suite and was around so often that the management named the downstairs bar after him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1994 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday mornings, Telly Savalas would hang around the bar at the Sheraton-Universal Hotel, sipping coffee, still in his slippers, watching football games on television. "What's the line on this one?" someone would ask. Savalas would shrug. "I got 6 1/2." Forget the lollipops and the "Who loves ya, baby?" At this Universal City hotel, Savalas was one of the guys. A regular. He kept a third-floor suite and was around so often that the management named the downstairs bar after him.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | From Associated Press
Telly Savalas, the gruff, hairless actor who became a television favorite as the lollipop-loving New York detective in the 1970s series "Kojak," died Saturday of prostate cancer. He was 70. Savalas died in his suite at the Sheraton-Universal Hotel in Universal City, said Mike Mamakos, a spokesman. "I loved him dearly. He was a wonderful man," Mamakos said. Savalas had undergone treatment for prostate cancer at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena. "Who loves ya, baby?"
Los Angeles Times Articles
|