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Temple Grandin

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Temple Grandin HBO, $26.98 Nearly every parent of an autistic child knows about Temple Grandin, the bestselling author and brilliant agricultural scientist who's been a model for what children on that spectrum can become. Playing Grandin in this HBO biopic, Claire Danes captures Grandin's braying monotone, stooped posture and default defensive stance to other people, but she also conveys her sense of humor and how she makes connections others can't. Some of the movie's aesthetic choices border on cliché, but Danes' performance is far from conventional, and director Mick Jackson supports her work with a visual style and sound design that reveals how Grandin perceives the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Claire Danes covers the August issue of Vogue magazine and she's candidly sharing exactly what she thinks about being a Hollywood actress. "I always have the fear that I won't be able to do it, because I am convinced that it left me and I don't know how I managed it before," the "Homeland" star tells the fashion tome. "You just hold out for those rare moments when you feel a real fusion with this imagined person. It's really like surfing. You get that wave and think, All right, I can be in freezing-cold water at 5:00 a.m. in the hopes that I will get one. And maybe you get three of those a year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010 | By MARY McNAMARA, Television Critic
At first glance, it might appear that Claire Danes and HBO are a little behind the curve with "Temple Grandin," a biopic about an early autistic advocate and educator. In the years since "Rain Man," autism has created something of a stock character in television and film. Indeed, when Danes was preparing for the role of Grandin, she had to look no further than her husband, Hugh Dancy, who recently starred in "Adam." But you can't be behind the curve when there is no curve, and there is no longer any curve on autism movies because Danes and the makers of "Temple Grandin" have blown it out of the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Cowboys, lawyers, and detectives were honored in their fight for justice (and good television) when the 70th annual George Foster Peabody Awards were announced Thursday by the University of Georgia Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. FX's modern-day western "Justified," CBS' legal drama "The Good Wife," and PBS' Sherlock Holmes update "Sherlock: A Study in Pink" each received one of a record 39 awards, which recognized the best work by radio and television stations, networks, webcasters, producing organizations and individuals for 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2010 | Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
HBO's critically acclaimed "Temple Grandin" told the remarkable real-life story of the bestselling author and groundbreaking agricultural scientist who struggled early in life to learn to cope with autism before the disease was widely known. On Sunday, the biopic, which had to overcome what was widely perceived in the industry as challenging subject matter to make its way to the screen, claimed five Emmy prizes, including outstanding made for TV movie. Attired in red and black rodeo gear, Grandin herself became a palpable presence at the ceremony, at one point, rising and excitedly swinging her hand lasso style from the audience.
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Animal scientist and autism activist Temple Grandin knew HBO was making a movie about her life. Plans had been in the works for years. But Claire Danes? She didn't know anything about the young actress who had been picked to play her. When the announcement was made, Grandin looked her up on the Internet. Her first thought: "Oooh. This little blond lady … she's going to be able to play me?" Not coincidentally, that was Danes' first reaction too, when director Mick Jackson approached her for the project.
BOOKS
May 4, 1986 | Joel Yager
For most people, infantile autism is a remote, terrifying disorder resembling a chilling psychosis, promising institutionalization for victims and unrelenting horror for families. Often having normal or superior intelligence, the autistic child is frequently too much for its family to handle and leads a discarded life. But, there are exceptions.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I can put myself into a 1,200-pound steer's body," Temple Grandin explains in "Thinking in Pictures." But while Grandin may be able to perceive the world from a cow's perspective, she cannot empathize with people. This is the paradox at the core of her identity as an autistic scientist. An autistic scientist might seem like an oxymoron, but the miracle of this memoir is that Grandin illustrates that it is not.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
The world of autism seems truly mysterious and daunting: A neurological disorder that short-circuits communication in the brain and in severe cases can make a prison of the mind. Imagine how frustrating that darkness, the density of that persistent fog, must be to parents struggling to communicate with autistic children. Despite its unfortunate title, the new documentary "A Mother's Courage: Talking Back to Autism" is a largely unsentimental journey into these murky waters. It follows Margret, an Icelandic woman with a severely impaired 11-year-old son, as she looks for answers in America and Europe.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
More than two decades ago, Dustin Hoffman won an Oscar for his portrayal of an autistic adult in the 1988 film "Rain Man. " This year, Claire Danes snagged an Emmy for her role in "Temple Grandin," an HBO movie that chronicled the remarkable life of an autistic woman who graduated from college and became an expert in the humane handling of livestock. Movies and TV shows can be a powerful force in shaping attitudes about mental health disorders, but do Hollywood-crafted tales tell the whole story?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin and Matt Donnelly, Los Angeles Times
Ricky Gervais' humor might have polarized the crowd at Sunday night's Golden Globes award ceremony, but as soon as the show wrapped, grudges seemed to have been checked at the velvet rope and the Beverly Hilton morphed into a party-hoppers' paradise. A-listers streamed out of the ballroom ? Scarlett Johansson, Halle Berry, Nicole Kidman, Christian Bale (alongside the real-life Temple Grandin) ? into the hotel lobby, which was awash in a flowy mess of peach, red, emerald and black formal wear.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2011
HBO led the pack with 14 nominations in the Directors Guild of America's awards for television and commercials for 2010, including nods for "Boardwalk Empire," "Entourage," "The Pacific," "Temple Grandin," "You Don't Know Jack" and Bill Maher's "But I'm Not Wrong. " DGA President Taylor Hackford announced the nominations Tuesday. Nominations for dramatic series included ABC's "Lost" (ignored by the Golden Globes and the Screen Actors Guild Awards) and AMC's "The Walking Dead" and "Mad Men," and comedy nods went to ABC's "Modern Family," NBC's "30 Rock" and Fox's "Glee.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Writers-directors Álvaro Pastor and Antonio Naharro's beguiling "Me Too" is a coming-of-age story with a difference: Its hero has Down syndrome ? and so does the actor who plays him. Pablo Pineda's Daniel is a university graduate who has just landed a job in a social services agency in Seville, where he quickly forms a friendship with a coworker, Laura (Lola Dueñas). Outgoing, free-spirited, a little edgy and sporting a bad bleach job, Laura quickly warms to the thoughtful, good-natured Daniel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Winter's Bone Lionsgate, $27.98; Blu-ray, $29.99 This is a tense, affecting crime saga that treats its Ozark setting like something out of Greek myth. Jennifer Lawrence stars as 17-year-old Ree Dolly, a high school dropout who goes looking for her bail-jumping father when the sheriff threatens to take away her family's property. As Ree roams up and down, knocking on doors, she angers the local drug lords, including her temperamental Uncle Teardrop, played by the magnificent John Hawkes.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña
The world of autism seems truly mysterious and daunting: A neurological disorder that short-circuits communication in the brain and in severe cases can make a prison of the mind. Imagine how frustrating that darkness, the density of that persistent fog, must be to parents struggling to communicate with autistic children. Despite its unfortunate title, the new documentary "A Mother's Courage: Talking Back to Autism" is a largely unsentimental journey into these murky waters. It follows Margret, an Icelandic woman with a severely impaired 11-year-old son, as she looks for answers in America and Europe.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
More than two decades ago, Dustin Hoffman won an Oscar for his portrayal of an autistic adult in the 1988 film "Rain Man. " This year, Claire Danes snagged an Emmy for her role in "Temple Grandin," an HBO movie that chronicled the remarkable life of an autistic woman who graduated from college and became an expert in the humane handling of livestock. Movies and TV shows can be a powerful force in shaping attitudes about mental health disorders, but do Hollywood-crafted tales tell the whole story?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010
SUNDAY Bon Jovi (above), Beyoncé and the Black Eyed Peas are among the musical acts slated to perform at "The 52nd Annual Grammy Awards." Also on tap: An all-star tribute to Michael Jackson, including a 3-D mini-movie. (CBS, 8 p.m.) MONDAY The new docu-series "Kell on Earth" tracks New York City public-relations maven Kelley Cutrone and her crew of aspiring flacks as they work behind the scenes to build buzz and generate positive press for their fashion-industry clientele.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2010 | Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
HBO's critically acclaimed "Temple Grandin" told the remarkable real-life story of the bestselling author and groundbreaking agricultural scientist who struggled early in life to learn to cope with autism before the disease was widely known. On Sunday, the biopic, which had to overcome what was widely perceived in the industry as challenging subject matter to make its way to the screen, claimed five Emmy prizes, including outstanding made for TV movie. Attired in red and black rodeo gear, Grandin herself became a palpable presence at the ceremony, at one point, rising and excitedly swinging her hand lasso style from the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Temple Grandin HBO, $26.98 Nearly every parent of an autistic child knows about Temple Grandin, the bestselling author and brilliant agricultural scientist who's been a model for what children on that spectrum can become. Playing Grandin in this HBO biopic, Claire Danes captures Grandin's braying monotone, stooped posture and default defensive stance to other people, but she also conveys her sense of humor and how she makes connections others can't. Some of the movie's aesthetic choices border on cliché, but Danes' performance is far from conventional, and director Mick Jackson supports her work with a visual style and sound design that reveals how Grandin perceives the world.
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