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Temporary Employment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented move, the Census Bureau has temporarily revised its policy to allow noncitizens to be hired as temporary census workers, a crucial move in cities such as Los Angeles where ethnically diverse communities need bilingual assistance. Ken Ellwanger, deputy regional director for the U.S. Census Bureau, said in a news conference Thursday that the temporary waiver will help his agency tap into a bigger pool of applicants.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staffing companies don't get paid until somebody shows up for work. Filling jobs fast is the goal. And helping some of the nation's biggest staffing companies do this is an upstart Manhattan Beach software firm called PeopleMover Inc. "These companies are in the just-in-time work force business," said Jim Jonassen, PeopleMover's chief executive. "But they leave open too many job orders."
BUSINESS
July 1, 1999 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
Atlantic Richfield Co., which was sued last week by nine current and former temporary workers who accused the oil company of misclassifying employees as temporary or contract workers to avoid paying benefits, has responded by saying that the plaintiffs never worked for the Los Angeles-based firm but were all employees of independent oil field service companies. Arco earlier had declined to comment until it studied the suit.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1999 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine current and former temporary workers sued Atlantic Richfield Co. on Thursday, accusing the Los Angeles oil company of misclassifying employees to avoid paying benefits during the last 10 years--a type of workplace dispute that is increasingly finding its way to court. The class-action lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, seeks for the workers the same health and pension benefits given to Arco's regular employees, who numbered 18,000 at the end of 1998.
NEWS
May 29, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think temp worker for the new economy and what do you see? Computer whizzes who choose flexibility over the boring 9-to-5 and get paid nicely for it? Think again--of hats, callused hands, grease under the fingernails. Think assembly lines. Forklifts. Machines that actually make things. The big growth in temporary staffing--which has outpaced overall employment growth for more than a decade--is not found in offices or on the Internet, but in factories and warehouses.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1999 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision that challenges corporate America's growing use of temporary workers to cut labor costs, a U.S. appeals court has ruled that thousands of workers Microsoft Corp. has employed through staffing agencies since 1986 are entitled to stock options. The decision could, if upheld, cost Microsoft tens of millions of dollars and force changes in the temp industry, which handles nearly 3 million employees a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN
Sam Kizito is looking for a job that pays better and an employer willing to work with Kizito's busy school schedule. So he cruised through a job fair Tuesday at Pierce College, speaking with company recruiters, handing out resumes and scribbling personal information on applications. "Most of the jobs available here are lower-level and entry, but I want something better," said Kizito, 21, who works as a bank teller and attends classes at Pierce.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, Daryl Strickland covers real estate for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5670, and at daryl.strickland@latimes.com
When new-home models open in prime Southern California locales, more companies are paring employment costs by hiring temporary workers to staff grand openings. During the first two months of the year, Real Estate Temps of San Clemente reported revenue has surged 30% over revenue a year ago. "The demand is very high," said JoAnne Williams, the firm's national director, "and it's pretty evenly divided around Southern California."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Room 202 of the Los Angeles Unified School District's sprawling headquarters, time is running out for a supervisor and 31 clerks who are desperately trying to supply 2,500 classrooms with substitute teachers. By 8 a.m. the tension is palpable. The clerks are speaking tersely into telephones while diligently riffling through teacher absentee slips fanned across their desks like poker hands.
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