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Temporary Jobs

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1994 | KAY SAILLANT
The Job Training Policy Council of Ventura County is conducting interviews to determine who will get about 1,200 minimum-wage jobs up for grabs this summer. Although the temporary jobs will not be available until July, prospective workers must apply now to be considered, said Dennis Holloway, a job-training recruitment specialist. "It's first-come, first-served," he said. "People need to make appointments now."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1985 | ROXANA KOPETMAN
Teen-agers and young adults looking for jobs in areas such as sales, computers, food preparation or equipment repair can apply for employment through two Anaheim youth programs. The city's Youth Job Training Program has two placement outlets, the Tryout Employment and the Summer Youth Employment programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2009 | Garrett Therolf
With local agencies already touting projects that are underway, Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday criticized the county's effort to get stimulus money as too slow and bureaucratic and said their lobbyists in Washington were providing too little information on when those funds would be available locally. "As of today, maybe even tomorrow, we don't know if that money's going to flow direct so that we have access to it . . . or if it will flow through the state and they'll take a huge chunk of it," said Supervisor Don Knabe, who announced earlier this month that he hoped to use federal money to fund 10,000 temporary jobs but now said he was unsure the deal will come together as planned.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Home improvement chain Home Depot Inc. is looking to fill 2,000 temporary jobs in the Los Angeles area and 70,000 positions nationwide in advance of the spring cleanup and gardening season, its busiest time of year. "Just as the Christmas rush and holiday hiring ends for many retailers, we begin recruiting for spring seasonal associates," Tim Crow, the company's executive vice president for human resources, said in a statement. Crow said a seasonal job at the Atlanta-based chain can lead to a regular position.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1989 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry members of the black community appeared Tuesday evening before Pasadena's Board of Directors to complain anew about what they see as the city's failure to promote and hire minorities. It was the third such protest in the past three months, sparked this time by the announcement Friday that a top black city administrator had been placed on administrative leave. Their persistence paid off.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cindy Scalafani, a college-educated woman with 23 years of secretarial experience, wanted a full-time job, but after several months of searching, she came up empty. So Scalafani went to a personnel supply firm. She took a temporary position at T.J. Maxx in Irvine and then turned it into a permanent job. "When I came in as a temporary, I put my best foot forward and tried to really show them what I could do," Scalafani said.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Chilton Alphonse says kids who sell drugs are good business people who just need to learn how to use their sales skills for legitimate business deals. "I'm tired of our children's lives getting torn apart when they are arrested," said Alphonse, executive director of the Community Youth Sports and Arts Foundation, a nonprofit resource center at 4828 Crenshaw Blvd. that works with inner-city kids.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | ARLENE SCHINDLER, Arlene Schindler lives in Los Angeles.
Most of my friends are currently unemployed. They used to work at dot-coms or sitcoms. It's bad enough to be unemployed, but your chances of getting hired come to a screeching halt when you reach your 40s. Becoming invisible after 40 is not just a quandary for movie stars; it impacts many people who are looking for work in Los Angeles. Like it or not, especially with the recent economic downturn, most large companies generally hire younger, less costly workers.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2004 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
California employers added jobs in May for a third straight month, a milestone that hadn't been achieved in more than three years and a sign that the state's fragile recovery is sustainable. "We've had some false starts before, but this looks like the real thing," said Howard Roth, chief economist for the state Department of Finance.
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