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May 9, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Britain will try to rejoin the Davis Cup World Group tournament for the first time since 1987 when it plays host to top-seeded Austria in a qualifying series Sept. 20-22. Sweden, which was in the Davis Cup finals from 1983-89, but lost in the first round this year to Yugoslavia, will play at the Philippines in another qualifier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting is apparently counting on a marriage that will last a lifetime, committing to a tattoo commemorating the day she became Mrs. Ryan Sweeting. The actress and the tennis player got engaged only three months after meeting, and were married about three months after that in a New Year's Eve ceremony. It's that Dec. 31, 2013, date that's commemorated in Roman numerals tattooed between her shoulder blades. Cuoco-Sweeting, 28, gave the world a peek Saturday night in an exhibition tennis match that saw them wearing coordinating hot-pink-and-black tennis gear.
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SPORTS
March 22, 2009 | Ellen Alperstein
Question: Why is a tennis score of 40-40 called "deuce"? Answer: Ancient civilizations in Rome, Greece and Egypt have made claim to the sport's origins, but what we recognize today as tennis is widely accepted to have begun in France. Where else but in the land of romance would athletic measure be articulated in the terms "love" and "deuce" (as in, it takes two)?
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Novak Djokovic proved Sunday at Indian Wells, in the men's final of the BNP Paribas Open, that Roger Federer does not walk on water. But then, Djokovic would be the first to admit that his older tennis rival does pretty well on hard courts amid the desert sand. The grand finale of this grand tournament ended up with Djokovic winning and, somehow, Federer not losing. Yes, the score went the way of the smooth-moving Serb, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3), and so did the winner's trophy and $1-million first prize.
SPORTS
August 24, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
NEW YORK - The contrasts used to be one of the most attractive elements of tennis. Pete Sampras standing at the net, Andre Agassi at the baseline trying to get the ball past his greatest rival. Chris Evert, dainty but cruelly clever in the backcourt, against Martina Navratilova, who moved forward, fast as a whip, knocking a volley that Evert lunged at or just missed, eliciting a squeak of frustration from Evert. Or John McEnroe, dancing on his toes, back and forth as Bjorn Borg stood at the back of the court and calculated the correct angle at which to whiz the ball past his rival - only to have McEnroe, with a flick of the wrist, gently drop the ball over the net, just in the spot where Borg couldn't reach it. Billie Jean King still volunteers to coach players and teach them to serve and volley.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
University of Oregon junior Alex Rovello drowned Saturday after failing to surface following a 60-foot dive into Tamolitch Falls in Willamette National Forest in western Oregon. Friends and bystanders tried to rescue the tennis player when he failed to surface after diving from a cliff into the Blue Pool at the base of the falls, but they were hampered by the deep, 37-degree water, the Linn County Sherriff's Department said. "The Oregon tennis family is devastated by the loss of Alex," Oregon men's tennis Coach Nils Schyllander said . "He was an amazing person and teammate and his spirit will live on forever with all of us who were fortunate enough to have known him. " The popular swimming hole, located about two miles north of a campground, is so remote that one witness needed to run two miles before getting cell service to call 911, KTVB.com reported . Rovello's body was recovered by dive teams and deputies more than 30 feet from the water's surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2003
Mary McNamara's column, "When the Game Takes on a Life of Its Own, We All Win" (July 15), hit home in my case, where it also applies to strengthening family ties. My two sisters and I, all in our 40s, have been playing tennis together almost every Sunday morning for at least 10 years. It's a weekly ritual that has helped us bond despite raising families, making career changes and enduring family crises. Our mother, who taught us the game when we were small, was our fourth until she died five years ago of cancer at age 66. She was an inspiration -- she played tennis up until the end, did aerobics four times a week, bicycled regularly and walked several miles daily.
SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | DAVE McKIBBEN
Dana Hills opted to stay in Division II this season, but this week the Dolphins are getting a taste of Division I competition. Tuesday, Dana Hills fell to the division's second-ranked team, Corona del Mar, 10-8. Today, the Dolphins host top-ranked and defending division champion Palos Verdes Peninsula. Last year, Dana Hills upset Peninsula, 10-8.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
According to US Weekly magazine, rumors during the U.S. Open tennis tournament were true.    Actress Kaley Cuoco, best known for her starring role in the highly popular TV comedy "The Big Bang Theory" and her role in Priceline commercials with actor William Shatner, is engaged to American tennis player Ryan Sweeting, who played at Florida before joining the ATP Tour. Sweeting is ranked No. 582 on the ATP Tour computer and his career-high ranking was 64. He won his first ATP-level tournament in Houston in 2011.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
A strange desert wind blew through Indian Wells and its Taj Mahal tennis facility in late afternoon Thursday, turning a women's quarterfinal into Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey. But it disappeared in time for the appearance of the evening's royalty, the Swiss king, Roger Federer. He was the feature of the day, the 7 p.m. match, the one where the ticket scalpers made their hay for the day. His name is legendary in tennis. Most legends build with time, after retirement, when history can be embellished a bit and reality can be retouched.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
The Swiss are represented in men's tennis at this year's BNP Paribas Open by Stanislas Wawrinka and that other guy. Wawrinka won the recent Australian Open and is now No. 3 in the world rankings. The other guy becomes Mr. Avis in Switzerland now, and as he tries harder, he holds on to No. 8 in the world. We jest, of course. Even Wawrinka knows it will take more than one Grand Slam title to displace Roger Federer as the king of Swiss celebrity. Maybe even as the king of tennis, period.
SPORTS
March 8, 2014 | By Art Spander
The old guy, Father Time, will triumph in the end. He always does. But for the moment Roger Federer is holding serve against him, which in a sport primarily of the young is no small achievement. Federer has come to terms with reality. "If I can't play for No. 1," he said three days ago, "I'll play for winning titles. " He won his 78th, third best all-time behind Jimmy Connors' 109 and Ivan Lendl's 94, a week ago at Dubai. And Saturday on an 83-degree afternoon at Indian Wells he made a start toward another, defeating Paul-Henri Mathieu, 6-2, 7-6 (3)
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Remember when we used to have exciting, successful men's tennis players from the United States? Come on. Think hard. Press those thumbs to your temples. Some hints. John McEnroe. Jimmy Connors. Pete Sampras. Michael Chang. Jim Courier. Andre Agassi. Remember Andy Roddick? That wasn't even that long ago. All these guys won majors, some of them lots. All of them had a fire in their bellies, and the thought of losing wasn't on their radar. Roddick was the last man from the U.S. to win a major, if you can believe that.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
It wasn't clear Thursday at Indian Wells whether Martina Hingis was making a comeback or just having a little fun with some hit-and-giggle tennis. Last year, she was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. That usually indicates that a playing career is over. But there she was Thursday, drawing perhaps a half-full house in the BNP Paribas tournament's new 8,000-seat Stadium 2, playing doubles with her friend and occasional tennis student, Sabine Lisicki of Germany.
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Art Spander
She went back to where it all started, to the wall in Sochi. Maria Sharapova, out of boredom really, as a child began smacking a tennis ball while her father played his weekly game a few feet away. "My career started in Sochi," Sharapova said Wednesday, reviewing her trip home and to the Winter Olympics. "Every player starts somewhere. To be able to celebrate that after so many years was special. " Sharapova, the defending champion, and other top women's seeds from the BNP Paribas Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden spent time with the media while others spent time on court on opening day. For Madison Keys, the young American, that time, brief as it might have been, was worthwhile.
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
You could say that the supporters practically needed a road map and provisions to find Eugenie Bouchard's outside far court for her first match at the Australian Open in January. By the end of the tournament, the throng had turned into Genie's Army and were becoming media celebrities in their own right, doing interviews about supporting the charismatic Canadian baseliner. “The Genie Army just created something on their own,” Bouchard said. “They're like famous on their own now. They don't need me anymore.” The 20-year-old from Montreal laughed at that last statement and joked that the stuffed-animal-throwing “army” could do its own reality show.
SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Bill Dwyre
If you are heading to the desert for some tennis viewing over the next 12 days, get ready for more of the same. In the case of the prestigious BNP Paribas Open, that's not a bad thing. There will be some radical differences in the physical plant, where there has been an estimated $70 million in improvements, including a new enclosed Stadium 2, plus palm trees and walkways and shady areas galore. This event, designated by the pro tours as the next notch below the four majors and bringing near-mandatory participation, has generally taken the approach of sparing no expense to get better.
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