Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTennis Players
IN THE NEWS

Tennis Players

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997
Have you read about the tennis players in Moorpark? All 300 of them in a city with a population of about 28,000! They want the other 27,000-plus of us to build eight to 12 tennis courts at a cost of $300,000 to $500,000. That's a lot of money and it doesn't even mention maintenance. I personally don't think the city has an obligation to do anything that benefits so few at such a cost to so many, especially in a time when we are wondering where we will get the money for important things like police and fire protection.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's 10 Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest -- the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Eight of the schools chose to participate and here is what we found: -- Many of the best tennis players at the college level have been raised in hyper-competitive environments.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
When athletes are having a good game they often talk about things moving in slow motion. A study out of Purdue University finds that altered perceptions may be somewhat universal and tied to performance. The study, published recently in the journal Perception , tried out various scenarios on tennis players and on people who played a version of the old-school video game Pong. In the tennis experiment 36 male and female tennis students at various levels were tested on their perception of ball speed.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
The Swiss are represented in men's tennis at this year's BNP Paribas Open by Stanislas Wawrinka and that other guy. Wawrinka won the recent Australian Open and is now No. 3 in the world rankings. The other guy becomes Mr. Avis in Switzerland now, and as he tries harder, he holds on to No. 8 in the world. We jest, of course. Even Wawrinka knows it will take more than one Grand Slam title to displace Roger Federer as the king of Swiss celebrity. Maybe even as the king of tennis, period.
SPORTS
February 22, 2009 | KURT STREETER
Venus Williams gathered in another big trophy Saturday, defeating Virginia Razzano to win the $2-million Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships in the United Arab Emirates. It was her 40th title, a wonderful feat, but if justice is the guide that it should be, this was a title nobody should have won. In fact, not a single match should have been contested at the Dubai tournament last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1995 | JAN STEVENS
Wheelchair tennis players from throughout the state will compete against non-wheelchair users in the fourth annual Hot Wheels Invitational Tennis Tournament this weekend. The event will be at Pierpont Racquet Club, 500 Sanjon Road, from noon to 6 p.m. today and Sunday. While the registration deadline for players has already passed, anyone can come and watch either day, event organizers said.
SPORTS
December 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
ROME -- The ATP suspended Italians Potito Starace and Daniele Bracciali on Saturday for making bets -- some as little as $7 -- on tennis matches involving other players. The Italian tennis federation denounced the penalties by the governing body as an "injustice," and the players said they have been made scapegoats. Starace, ranked 31st, was suspended for six weeks and fined $30,000, the Italian federation said. Bracciali, ranked 258th, was banned for three months and fined $20,000.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | Thomas Bonk
So what if Ivan Lendl pulled out of the Volvo/Los Angeles tournament at the last minute two years ago? So what if he did it again last week? When the $425,000 Grand Prix event begins Monday at the Los Angeles Tennis Center at UCLA, three of its top four players--Lendl, Pat Cash and Aaron Krickstein--will have pulled out, leaving only one player, Andre Agassi, ranked in the top 21 in the field of 32. So what does that make this Volvo tournament? Will it be a who wins?/who cares?
SPORTS
March 8, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Taylor Townsend has both confidence and charm. The 16-year-old can smile when she talks about some hubbub caused last year at the U.S. Open when it was publicly suggested the teenager might be too chubby. Since the suggestion was made by the United States Tennis Assn., which offers funding and coaching help to top athletes, the criticism carried more, um, weight. But Townsend has gone on her tennis way, which is to hit big ground strokes and use USTA coaches and trainers to keep making her better.
SPORTS
August 26, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
NEW YORK — This might be the year to expect some surprises at the U.S. Open. Play in the year's final tennis major begins Monday at 8 a.m. PDT, with defending women's champion Samantha Stosur getting the honor of opening on Arthur Ashe Stadium against Petra Martic of Croatia. And the first men on Ashe court will be third-seeded Andy Murray, the newly crowned Olympic champion, and Alex Bogomolov Jr., who once played as an American and now represents Russia. This summer has been jam-packed with the insertion of the Olympics into the short space between Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Remember when we used to have exciting, successful men's tennis players from the United States? Come on. Think hard. Press those thumbs to your temples. Some hints. John McEnroe. Jimmy Connors. Pete Sampras. Michael Chang. Jim Courier. Andre Agassi. Remember Andy Roddick? That wasn't even that long ago. All these guys won majors, some of them lots. All of them had a fire in their bellies, and the thought of losing wasn't on their radar. Roddick was the last man from the U.S. to win a major, if you can believe that.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
It wasn't clear Thursday at Indian Wells whether Martina Hingis was making a comeback or just having a little fun with some hit-and-giggle tennis. Last year, she was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. That usually indicates that a playing career is over. But there she was Thursday, drawing perhaps a half-full house in the BNP Paribas tournament's new 8,000-seat Stadium 2, playing doubles with her friend and occasional tennis student, Sabine Lisicki of Germany.
SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Bill Dwyre
If you are heading to the desert for some tennis viewing over the next 12 days, get ready for more of the same. In the case of the prestigious BNP Paribas Open, that's not a bad thing. There will be some radical differences in the physical plant, where there has been an estimated $70 million in improvements, including a new enclosed Stadium 2, plus palm trees and walkways and shady areas galore. This event, designated by the pro tours as the next notch below the four majors and bringing near-mandatory participation, has generally taken the approach of sparing no expense to get better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014
Louise Brough Clapp Top-ranked tennis player of the 1940s, '50s Louise Brough Clapp, 90, a former top-ranked tennis player who learned the game on Beverly Hills' Roxbury Park courts and went on to win 35 major tournament titles in the 1940s and '50s, died Monday at her home in Vista after a brief illness. The International Tennis Hall of Fame announced her death. Born Althea Louise Brough on March 11, 1923, in Oklahoma City, she moved to Beverly Hills as a child. By her early teens she was competing in junior tennis tournaments and became national champion in the 18-and-under category in 1940 and '41. A dominant serve-and-volley player, she had a remarkable run at Wimbledon, winning the women's singles title in 1948, '49, '50 and '55. She also competed in women's doubles and mixed doubles and appeared in 21 of the 30 finals played at the All England Club from 1946 through 1955 in the three categories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
Tennis isn't much of a big deal at South L.A.'s struggling Jefferson High. The two dozen kids who play on the boys' and girls' teams practice on a pair of beaten courts at a gang-riddled, graffiti-tagged park. It wasn't long ago that both squads - stacked with teens still learning basic tennis rules - shared six beaten rackets and sometimes played in jeans. "Shoes?" said David Herrera, who coaches the girls' team. "A lot of my players didn't even know there was such a thing as shoes made just for tennis.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
According to US Weekly magazine, rumors during the U.S. Open tennis tournament were true.    Actress Kaley Cuoco, best known for her starring role in the highly popular TV comedy "The Big Bang Theory" and her role in Priceline commercials with actor William Shatner, is engaged to American tennis player Ryan Sweeting, who played at Florida before joining the ATP Tour. Sweeting is ranked No. 582 on the ATP Tour computer and his career-high ranking was 64. He won his first ATP-level tournament in Houston in 2011.
SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | From wire reports
Two Orange County tennis players were eliminated Thursday in the quarterfinals of the boys' 18s division at the Easter Bowl Tennis Championships. David Roditi of San Clemente was defeated by Jason Thompson of Salem, Ore., the fifth-seeded player in the tournament, 7-5, 6-3. Thompson nearly blew a 5-2 lead in the first set before holding on. Nirav Patel of Owensboro, Ky., beat last year's 16s champion, Adam Peterson of Orange, 6-0, 7-5.
SPORTS
September 3, 1991 | STEVEN HERBERT
Three Orange County tennis players--Jon Leach, Adam Peterson and Keri Phebus--were among the first-round losers Monday in the junior division of the U.S. Open in New York. Leach, who graduated from Laguna Beach High in January and helped USC win its first NCAA tennis championship since 1976, fell to Maxsy Jimemez of Venezuela, 3-6, 6-2, 7-6 (7-4). Peterson, from Orange, was defeated by Massimo Bertolini of Italy, 6-3, 6-4.
SPORTS
August 31, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
NEW YORK - They're professionals and have been playing tennis since they were very young. They know how to hit forehands and backhands, serves and maybe even volleys. They're at the top of their game and playing in a grand slam tournament. So what's left to learn? It's a fact that the best tennis players in the world still need coaching. Technique can be adjusted, attitude can be sharpened. And gaining even the slightest competitive advantage can make a meaningful difference.
SPORTS
July 9, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
  Fresh-faced Josh Berry has done his homework. His tennis homework, that is. The youtube.com sensation has extensively studied tennis stars, from the likes of Andy Murray, the now-retired Andy Roddick, Novak Djokovic and, of course, Rafael Nadal. His biggest test came when the French racket company Babolat put him with the Spanish tennis legend and had Nadal judge his impersonations. Nadal, looking slightly sheepish, was a good sport. You can judge the video yourself.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|