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Tenyo Maru Ship

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NEWS
July 30, 1991 | Reuters
More than 400 birds, including two bald eagles, and three sea otters were mired in oil Monday as Canadian authorities commissioned a submarine to see if the leak from a sunken Japanese ship could be controlled. The birds, mostly murres, were recovered by rescue workers; 139 of them were dead, but the bald eagles and 302 others survived and may be saved.
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NEWS
July 30, 1991 | Reuters
More than 400 birds, including two bald eagles, and three sea otters were mired in oil Monday as Canadian authorities commissioned a submarine to see if the leak from a sunken Japanese ship could be controlled. The birds, mostly murres, were recovered by rescue workers; 139 of them were dead, but the bald eagles and 302 others survived and may be saved.
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NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Waves of frothy oil from a sunken Japanese fishing vessel have begun washing ashore on some of America's most pristine shores, threatening sea otters and tens of thousands of birds, Coast Guard officials said Saturday. More than a dozen oil-drenched birds, both dead and alive, have been found on beaches, said state Department of Wildlife spokesman Doug Zimmer. "They're so coated," Lorraine Durick, a volunteer with the Wild Animal Clinic of Monroe told the Seattle Times. "This stuff is like glue.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews scrambled to a contaminated beach in Olympic National Park as oil from a sunken Japanese ship continued to slosh ashore, threatening thousands of sea birds and mammals. Globs of oil mixed with kelp began washing ashore four days after the Tenyo Maru collided with another ship and sank off Washington's northwest tip.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews scrambled to a contaminated beach in Olympic National Park as oil from a sunken Japanese ship continued to slosh ashore, threatening thousands of sea birds and mammals. Globs of oil mixed with kelp began washing ashore four days after the Tenyo Maru collided with another ship and sank off Washington's northwest tip.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Waves of frothy oil from a sunken Japanese fishing vessel have begun washing ashore on some of America's most pristine shores, threatening sea otters and tens of thousands of birds, Coast Guard officials said Saturday. More than a dozen oil-drenched birds, both dead and alive, have been found on beaches, said state Department of Wildlife spokesman Doug Zimmer. "They're so coated," Lorraine Durick, a volunteer with the Wild Animal Clinic of Monroe told the Seattle Times. "This stuff is like glue.
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