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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999
The Ventura Audubon Society recently constructed an enclosure near the Santa Clara River estuary as a protected place for the endangered least terns to make their nests. At this time of year, many other shorebirds nest in the estuary, including American avocets, black-necked stilts, killdeer, snowy plovers, mallards and several species of herons. Thus the estuary has been declared a continentally important bird area by the American Bird Conservancy. Please refrain from taking dogs past the fenced tern area for the duration of the shorebird breeding season (through Aug. 1)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
CORONADO - On most days, a three-mile stretch of Silver Strand beach here is used for training Navy SEALs, sailors and Marines. Thursday was not a usual day. Dozens of sailors spent the morning in a slow, head-down walk along the restricted beach, searching for detritus that could harm the Western snowy plover and the California least tern, two imperiled bird populations that use the strand for nesting. "This is our office," said sailor Daniel Torres, 26, from New Mexico, one of the Navy beachmasters - specialists in bringing vehicles and other heavy equipment ashore from amphibious assault ships.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1995
The article on the current plight of Ventura County's least terns ("A Tern For the Better," July 6) is remarkable only in its failure to present all the pertinent facts. When you state that "state and federal laws now protect the terns," you merely perpetuate a wrongly held assumption that these laws are being obeyed. Nothing could be further from the truth. These well-intentioned laws, with their stiff penalties and fines, have never been enforced to an effective degree at Ormond Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
It cost the Port of Los Angeles roughly $350,000 to make a windswept spit of sand on the southeastern edge of the world's largest container terminal as welcoming as possible for a breeding colony of endangered California least terns. Among the special touches installed in January at Pier 400 were chick fences; tons of carefully groomed imported sand; and predator controls, including live traps to keep out raccoons, feral cats and crows. Things didn't work out as planned. On a recent weekday, port biologist Kathleen Keane surveyed the 15-acre site through binoculars and shook her head in disappointment.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jets roar to a takeoff and scream over the Oakland Bay Bridge, making the Alameda Naval Air Station runway seem one of the most unlikely places for a nature preserve. But each summer the air station is transformed into a sort of maximum-security bird sanctuary when nesting pairs of California least terns begin to breed in a fenced-in some 75 yards from a runway flanked by land-based cannons and armed warships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1994
I was disturbed, but not surprised, to read about red foxes and kestrels preying on the least terns at Bolsa Chica ("Fox In The Tern House," June 3). As a graduate student in biology at Cal State Long Beach in the 1980s, I assisted in monitoring the least tern colonies along our coast. Kestrels, red foxes and domestic cats all prey on least terns. If the plan by the Koll Real Estate Group to build almost 5,000 homes at Bolsa Chica is approved, the predation problems will only get worse.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2010 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The sickening images of pelicans struggling in oil along Louisiana's barrier islands only hint at what's at stake if the slick forces its way into the state's 3 ½ million acres of estuaries and marshes. These bays and bayous are thrumming with life — they are far more biologically diverse than the Everglades — and serve as nursery and breeding ground for the gulf's world famous shrimp, crab, oyster and fish. The wetlands system that fringes the coast is often called "Liquid Louisiana."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1986 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, Times Staff Writer
The Navy today will begin trapping red foxes that are threatening the survival of two endangered bird species at a wildlife refuge within the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, a base spokesman said Friday. "The first traps are going to be set this weekend," said Curt Sandberg, acting public information officer at the base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1998
I sincerely hope the U.S. Border Patrol demonstrates a higher level of compassion toward sensitive species during construction of its new fence (Aug. 16) than its past record indicates. Border Patrol agents have intruded upon nesting sites for the endangered California least tern at the Tijuana River mouth, disturbing parent terns off their nests and occasionally trampling on eggs. However, during discussions about these violations, they insinuate that their mandate is far more important than provisions of the Endangered Species Act. KATHY KEANE Statewide Coordinator for Least Tern Monitoring Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2001
There's something incongruous about the proprietors of a site devoted to weapons of mass destruction welcoming bird lovers to their property. It's to the credit of the U.S. Navy on one side and civilian bird monitors on the other that an accommodation has been found at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. The facility has an island where least terns nest.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2010 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The sickening images of pelicans struggling in oil along Louisiana's barrier islands only hint at what's at stake if the slick forces its way into the state's 3 ½ million acres of estuaries and marshes. These bays and bayous are thrumming with life — they are far more biologically diverse than the Everglades — and serve as nursery and breeding ground for the gulf's world famous shrimp, crab, oyster and fish. The wetlands system that fringes the coast is often called "Liquid Louisiana."
SCIENCE
January 16, 2010 | By Amina Khan
Of all migrating birds, the Arctic tern flies the farthest -- braving cold, wind, storms, predators and starvation to travel from as far as upper Greenland to the shores of Antarctica. But little has been known about how these birds, weighing less than 125 grams, make their grueling journey. Now, for the first time, scientists using tiny geolocating devices have tracked the terns' migration, and discovered some surprising details. The tern can fly an average of about 44,000 miles, nearly twice the distance that scientists had predicted -- and some individuals can fly more than 50,000 miles in a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2008 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Most members of the Dorsey High School Global Warriors had never heard of the California least tern when it nested last spring on a breezy beach near Marina del Rey. Yet like seasoned conservation biologists, the Warriors reeled off facts Saturday as they wrestled invading Cakile maritima from the sands where the rare seabird is due to return in April. "We haven't seen them personally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Tour boat captain Dan Salas radioed for help Saturday as soon as he noticed a drowning baby seabird in the rolling swell beside a barge anchored in Long Beach Harbor. Three minutes later, Long Beach lifeguards arrived in a patrol boat and set to work, providing the 20 tourists aboard Salas' 80-foot vessel, Kristina, with a rare view of an avian rescue operation half a mile offshore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Capping a 10 1/2 -month investigation that came to be known as "Terngate," a tugboat captain and his deckhand are expected to be charged this morning in connection with the deaths last summer of hundreds of seabirds in the Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex. The charges in the case that came to light in June when the corpses of newly hatched terns began washing up on local beaches will be announced at a news conference at Long Beach City Hall led by city prosecutor John Fentis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
As authorities consider whether to file criminal charges in the deaths of hundreds of seabirds in the Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex, wildlife advocates and shippers on Thursday said they are considering new protocols for storing and moving barges that often become nesting sites. "It's an issue that needs to be addressed," said Long Beach city prosecutor John Fentis.
OPINION
September 11, 2004
Re "Paragliders Suspected in Dearth of Least Terns," Sept. 7: As an ornithologist with over 20 years of least tern experience, I can confirm that these birds often leave nests in an attempt to defend them from low-flying aircraft and aerial predators. Least tern numbers at Ormond Beach began to decline after the creation in 1999 of a new nesting island at the nearby Point Mugu Naval Base. Nest numbers since 1999 have increased over 200% at Point Mugu while decreasing over 45% at Ormond Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000
The remarkable story of the comeback of the California least terns at the Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge is a tribute to dedicated volunteers who kept the predators away. It's a heartening commentary on the virtues of organization and commitment. Last year all the eggs and chicks of the endangered bird were devoured by the killers of the air: crows, hawks and falcons. Bird-watchers said many adult birds also died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
State wildlife officials Wednesday said they have forwarded the results of a seven-month investigation into the deaths of hundreds of young seabirds last summer to the Long Beach city attorney's office for prosecution. More than 500 terns -- slim seabirds related to gulls but in this case mostly too young to fly -- plummeted off two privately owned barges in the Long Beach Harbor in late June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2006 | Ashley Surdin, Times Staff Writer
They were cold, wet and hungry when wildlife experts carried them into the International Bird Rescue Research Center in June, not far from where they were discovered among scores of dead birds that washed ashore in Long Beach. On Monday, after six weeks of feeding and exercise at the facility in San Pedro, the nine surviving terns, now plump with feathers, took flight after their release at Cabrillo Beach. "When they came in, they were babies.
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