Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTerrence Mcnally
IN THE NEWS

Terrence Mcnally

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2012 | By David Ng
The latest edition of the annual Ojai Playwrights Conference, set for  August, will feature a new play by Terrence McNally, as well as return appearances by Stephen Adly Guirgis and Father Gregory Boyle. The conference, one of the country's top centers for new play development, is scheduled to take place Aug. 8 to 12. McNally's play "And Away We Go," which will be the closing workshop production of the conference, travels through time to visit various theatrical rehearsals in ancient Rome, Shakespeare's Globe and other historic venues.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
It's a softer-grained “Master Class” than usual in Long Beach, but just try to look away. Although more muted than some past editions, this adroit International City Theatre revival of Terrence McNally's Tony-winning fantasia on Maria Callas' life and art carries real immediacy and thematic point. We're in 1971, when the semi-retired Callas taught a series of voice classes at Juilliard. This historic event underscores McNally's post-Pirandello mélange of biographical data and fictionalized histrionics.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Playwright Terrence McNally is so busy he never calls from home. He's at a pay phone somewhere in New York, he's at the theater, he's anywhere but relaxing with nothing to do. One of the nation's premier playwrights, McNally is currently working on the book for a musical version of "The Kiss of the Spider Woman." TV audiences will get a chance to sample McNally's work Wednesday at 10 p.m. on KCET when his one-hour play "Andre's Mother" will be shown on "American Playhouse."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
There are some writers who slow down with age. Terrence McNally, 72, is in many ways the opposite - a playwright who seems to grow more productive and adventurous as he gets older. With four Tony Awards to his name, McNally could easily rest on his honors. But the writer clearly isn't in the retirement mind-set. This week, McNally is at the Ojai Playwrights Conference to present his new play "AndAway We Go," a time-hopping, meta-theatrical drama that he describes as one of his most experimental works.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nothing and everything happens in Terrence McNally's "Lips Together, Teeth Apart." Two couples spend the Fourth of July together in a beach house on Fire Island where nothing happens--except that they get to know themselves and each other better. But in the process they touch on everything--mortality, fear, prejudice, love, intimacy and the confusion that comes with day-to-day living as individuals and as partners in relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"I love you, but you don't love me. I would like to kill you, but I can't so I will hurt you instead." In the land of "Love! Valour! Compassion!," Terrence McNally's paean to friendship and love in the shadow of illness, eight male friends each know precisely what they're feeling and why they're feeling it, always. Trading off narration like a baton, the friends are staying at a country house on a series of holiday weekends.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's Only a Play" is Terrence McNally's "Give My Regards to Broadway," a lightweight tribute to the theater as seen from the lofty but limited vantage point of Broadway artists who are consumed by New York's hit/flop mentality.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Terrence McNally, whose "Master Class" has brought the lofty art of Maria Callas to the Mark Taper Forum, is an opera expert worth taking seriously. I first suspected that 20 years ago when, in the course of an inspired bit of foolishness called "The Ritz," he staged a Zinka Milanov look-alike contest in a gay bath-house. I have known it all too well on numerous subsequent occasions when we happened to share the microphone during the quiz-game intermissions on Metropolitan Opera broadcasts.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | Richard Stayton, Richard Stayton's last story for this magazine was a profile of playwrights John Steppling and Jon Robin Baitz.
ALTHOUGH IT'S ONLY A PLAY READING, THE REHEARSAL ROOM QUAKES WITH laughter. The cast members turn script pages with trembling fingers, leaning on the table to maintain their concentration. Director John Tillinger pulls his sweater over his ruddy face and chews into the fabric, but he can't stop the giggles bubbling out of its headless neck. Keene Curtis, on a break from his recurring role as the snippy restaurant owner in "Cheers," shows no mercy while reading aloud his dialogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For some reason, it seems as if every successful American playwright: a) Counts the money coming in from the latest hit, then b) Blows off steam by writing a play that trashes the whole establishment that made the money possible in the first place. Not every playwright does it, of course (the perennial class act, Arthur Miller, for instance) but from Neil Simon to John Patrick Shanley to Terrence McNally, a lot of them do, and it's almost always a bad idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2012 | By David Ng
The latest edition of the annual Ojai Playwrights Conference, set for  August, will feature a new play by Terrence McNally, as well as return appearances by Stephen Adly Guirgis and Father Gregory Boyle. The conference, one of the country's top centers for new play development, is scheduled to take place Aug. 8 to 12. McNally's play "And Away We Go," which will be the closing workshop production of the conference, travels through time to visit various theatrical rehearsals in ancient Rome, Shakespeare's Globe and other historic venues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
The 24 Hour Plays, a staple of the New York City theater community's charitable effort for arts education since 2006, made its L.A. debut last June at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica -- where the clock will begin ticking again Friday at 10 p.m. for the second L.A. installment. The process calls for a 24-member acting ensemble, six writers and six directors to come up with a half-dozen short plays from conception to performance over the course of 24 hours. It will start Friday evening with actors feeding ideas to the writers, who, working individually, are supposed to finish their scripts by 6 a.m. so the directors can look them over, decide which four actors to attach to which play, and start rehearsals by 8 a.m. The curtain goes up for ticketholders Saturday at 8 p.m., so technically the lead-off script will be a 22-hour play.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Playwright Stephen Karam has made a splash off-Broadway with one play and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize with another. But for memorable moments in his stage career, he says there's nothing quite like his teenage triumphs in the Blank Theatre's annual young playwrights competition and festival. "When you see people taking your work seriously at that age, it makes a big impression," said Karam, 32. "For the first time I thought of myself as a real writer. " For two decades, the small, Hollywood-based Blank has presented plays and musicals by students 19 and younger with directors such as Barbara Bain and Jeremy Sisto, mentors such as Garry Marshall and Terrence McNally and actors such as Sarah Michelle Gellar, Debra Messing and Chris Pine.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011
Rita Moreno has flourished on stage and screens, big and small. A few of her credits: 'The Ritz' Moreno earned a Tony as hapless performer Googie Gomez in Terrence McNally's 1975 Broadway comedy and reprised her role in the 1976 film. 'West Side Story' Moreno won the supporting actress Oscar as Maria's fiery sister, Anita, in the 1961 best picture winner. 'Oz' Moreno was one of the few actresses on HBO's gritty 1997-2003 prison drama "Oz," playing counselor Sister Peter Marie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2009
Gehry to design theater An independent theater company that had once planned to move to ground zero will get a new home designed by famed architect Frank Gehry in New York City's theater district. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday that the city would contribute $25 million toward the $60-million Signature Theatre. The theater is known for devoting an entire season to the work of a single playwright. It was one of four groups that were to have anchored a performance space at the World Trade Center site.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | SUSAN KING
Long before she became a TV icon as the ultimate Italian mamma Marie Barone on "Everybody Loves Raymond," Doris Roberts was a young actress trying to make a name for herself in New York in the 1950s alongside some classmates who went on to bigger things as well. "I was a member of the Actors Studio," Roberts said in a recent interview. "Marilyn Monroe used to come to class. Martin Balsam was there. Anne Bancroft was there. Geraldine Page."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Gaslamp Quarter Theatre Company has reopened with a virile roar that shook the rafters of the sedate Hahn Cosmopolitan Theatre. Audience surprise mingled with an appreciation that grew to a standing ovation by the end of the company's presentation of the San Diego premiere of "Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune." Could this be the same company that closed in May with a starchy performance of Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit"? A show that went begging for audiences?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Terrence McNally--whose "Lisbon Traviata" is beguiling, bemusing, amusing and shocking audiences these days at the Mark Taper Forum--knows his opera. He is erudite and passionate. It is a nice combination of virtues. A frequent guest on the quiz programs that take up the second intermissions of Metropolitan Opera broadcasts, he can be counted upon to reduce his fellow "experts"--especially this one--to tongue-tied dunces.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
On a sweltering summer night, the tenants of a Greenwich Village apartment house gather together on the rooftop to celebrate the fifth wedding anniversary of two of its residents. This being a Terrence McNally play can mean only one thing: a punch bowl of snappy laughter spiked by intimations of mortality. In "Unusual Acts of Devotion," which is having its West Coast premiere at La Jolla Playhouse, the author of "Lips Together, Teeth Apart" and "Love! Valour! Compassion!" offers yet another group portrait in which love and death, desire and dissatisfaction are viewed from long and short distances -- as though McNally were alternately using a microscope and a telescope to find out what lies in his characters' hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2004 | Stephen Farber, Special to The Times
The explosion of reality TV shows has changed the face of the entertainment business, not always in predictable ways. Some of the most creative people in Hollywood are jumping aboard this bandwagon in their own fashion, hatching television shows and movies that blur the line between truth and fiction. Instead of merely pandering to viewers' voyeuristic impulses, they tease this bizarre craze.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|