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Terrorism Georgia

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NEWS
July 29, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Authorities reported a growing number of bomb threats at the Olympics on Sunday as the Georgia National Guard mobilized more troops and investigators indicated that the person who exploded a pipe bomb at the Games the day before might be an American. "Bomb threat calls have increased," Atlanta Police Chief Beverly Harvard said. She did not have specific numbers.
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NEWS
February 1, 1998 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
I wanted to revive my Olympic memories, to see if I could get that old feeling back, that blanket of goose bumps that says the world of sports is a Bud Greenspan film. So I took a walk in the park. But it sure wasn't. It had been a year and a half since I'd set foot in Olympic Centennial Park, a year and a half since that night that rocked our spirits and bombed our naivete.
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NEWS
October 29, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alternately weepy and admonishing, Richard Jewell willingly faced a barrage of television cameras for the first time Monday, describing the "nightmare" of the last three months and lashing out at the FBI and the news media, which he said almost destroyed his life. The 33-year-old security guard was cleared of suspicion by the Justice Department over the weekend in the July 27 pipe bomb explosion in Centennial Olympic Park.
SPORTS
July 29, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Where were you, one year ago? I know exactly where I was, a year ago Sunday. I was with three women at a Hyatt hotel, in a coffee shop, off the lobby. I remember many tiny details, such as one of the women ordering chili. Any woman who orders chili after 1 o'clock in the morning is a woman after my own heartburn. What I also remember is, she never got to eat it. My beeper went off. I cursed, because it was late and I was beat. I figured to be off-duty at that hour.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Littered on the sidewalks of Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park, the metal shavings, bits of plastic and torn fiber from last weekend's fatal explosion at first appeared as innocuous as trash blown from a construction site.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three days after a pipe bomb hung a wreath of terror over the centennial Olympic Games, investigators said Tuesday that the security guard who had been hailed as a hero for finding the bomb and warning authorities was now a suspect in the case. No arrests have been made, and authorities stressed that many people have been questioned in connection with the bombing.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | From Reuters
Federal investigators said Tuesday they had received hundreds of telephone calls offering clues after their appeal for information on the bombings this year of an abortion clinic and a gay nightclub and the deadly Centennial Olympic Park bombing last July.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 180 feet below Peachtree Street in the heart of the city, a trio of cellists from the Atlanta Youth Symphony is playing Brahms and thousands of bag-toting visitors are floating down long escalators to the train platform when Wesley Tillman spots a man who might be the person he's been seeking all his professional life. Two days after a terrorist bomb exploded three blocks away, that search has never seemed more urgent.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ATLANTA--Federal officials, citing progress in their investigation of four mail bombings and attempted bombings in the South, said Thursday that "follow-up" threats mailed to two of the four targets may point the way to suspects in the crimes. There is a strong possibility that the new letters, mailed this week, were sent by the same person or group responsible for sending the powerful package bombs that killed a federal judge Saturday and a lawyer two days later, the officials said.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | From Reuters
Federal investigators said Tuesday they had received hundreds of telephone calls offering clues after their appeal for information on the bombings this year of an abortion clinic and a gay nightclub and the deadly Centennial Olympic Park bombing last July.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Richard Jewell sued the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the college where he once worked as a security guard on Tuesday, accusing them of libeling him in stories linking him to the Olympic park bombing. Jewell's lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages, accuses the newspapers of portraying him as a man with "a bizarre employment history and an aberrant personality" who likely was guilty of placing the bomb.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the satellite trucks are gone from Richard Jewell's street and the microphones are packed off to some newer emergency than this summer's Olympic bombing, a crucial question remains for the media: How do you unmake a villain? Jewell, a 33-year-old security guard, spent nearly three months as an international pariah after the Atlanta Journal came out with an extra edition July 30 naming him as the "focus" of the FBI's bombing investigation.
NEWS
October 29, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alternately weepy and admonishing, Richard Jewell willingly faced a barrage of television cameras for the first time Monday, describing the "nightmare" of the last three months and lashing out at the FBI and the news media, which he said almost destroyed his life. The 33-year-old security guard was cleared of suspicion by the Justice Department over the weekend in the July 27 pipe bomb explosion in Centennial Olympic Park.
SPORTS
October 28, 1996 | MIKE DOWNEY
This was the year I saw a man lynched, and not with a rope. The man in question is Richard Jewell, 33, who was officially cleared Saturday as a suspect in the July 27 pipe-bomb blast during the Atlanta Olympics that left two people dead and terrified thousands more. I don't know if O.J. Simpson killed his ex-wife, or if Timothy McVeigh blew up that Oklahoma City office building, or if Theodore J.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge, who says he believes that Richard Jewell is no longer a suspect in the Centennial Olympic Park bombing, has ordered officials to release sealed documents showing why the former security guard fell under suspicion in the first place. U.S. District Judge Owen Forrester gave the Justice Department one week to challenge his order in a higher court or unseal FBI affidavits used to obtain warrants to search Jewell's property.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge, who says he believes that Richard Jewell is no longer a suspect in the Centennial Olympic Park bombing, has ordered officials to release sealed documents showing why the former security guard fell under suspicion in the first place. U.S. District Judge Owen Forrester gave the Justice Department one week to challenge his order in a higher court or unseal FBI affidavits used to obtain warrants to search Jewell's property.
SPORTS
July 29, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Where were you, one year ago? I know exactly where I was, a year ago Sunday. I was with three women at a Hyatt hotel, in a coffee shop, off the lobby. I remember many tiny details, such as one of the women ordering chili. Any woman who orders chili after 1 o'clock in the morning is a woman after my own heartburn. What I also remember is, she never got to eat it. My beeper went off. I cursed, because it was late and I was beat. I figured to be off-duty at that hour.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Federal authorities are considering removing Richard Jewell as an active suspect in the Atlanta Olympics bombing case, say Jewell's attorney and law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Associated Press
The battery that was likely used to detonate the bomb at Centennial Olympic Park came from a South Florida hardware chain, Atlanta television station WXIA reported Thursday. The 12-volt battery, a type commonly used for lanterns, was in a shipment of 24 batteries delivered to the Sewell Hardware chain earlier this year, owner Worley Sewell told the television station. The battery was tracked to the West Palm Beach, Fla.-based chain by its lot number.
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