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Terrorism Iran

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NEWS
March 11, 1989 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, Times Staff Writers
The wife of Capt. Will Rogers III, skipper of the San Diego-based Vincennes, escaped unharmed Friday morning moments before a pipe bomb exploded under her van, igniting a fire that gutted her vehicle at a busy La Jolla intersection. Hours after the 7:40 a.m. explosion, the FBI took control of the investigation, suspecting that the bombing might be an act of "domestic terrorism" linked to the Vincennes' accidental downing of an Iranian civilian airliner in the Persian Gulf last July, killing 290.
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NEWS
June 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A mortar attack damaged a government-owned building in Tehran, Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency reported. An armed opposition group claimed the attack was part of an assault on four buildings that caused heavy casualties. According to IRNA, witnesses said a mortar shell hit the offices of the Foundation for the Needy and Disabled in northern Tehran on Monday night. Moujahedeen Khalq claimed responsibility. IRNA did not mention casualties and did not describe the extent of the damage.
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NEWS
February 20, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
When the first bomb threat came two weeks before Christmas, many employees here at Viking Penguin dismissed it as a prank. It seemed improbable that Islamic protests over Salman Rushdie's new novel "The Satanic Verses" would suddenly threaten the safety of a respected American publishing house. "Nobody seemed worried that we had published this book," said a senior editor. "I remember taking some of my staff across the street for a drink while police cleared out the building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2001 | TERRY McDERMOTT and SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five Iranian nationals and two Iranian Americans appeared in federal court in Los Angeles on Wednesday on charges of raising more than $1 million to fund terrorist activities abroad. Most of the money was solicited from unsuspecting travelers at Los Angeles International Airport and sent to bank accounts in Turkey controlled by an anti-Iranian government group called the Moujahedeen Khalq, according to the FBI.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE and DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writers
A tanker carrying liquefied petroleum gas sailed from Kuwait with an escort of U.S. warships Saturday, the first U.S. naval convoy through the perilous waters of the Persian Gulf since a supertanker was damaged by a mine nine days ago. The 46,723-ton Gas Prince, a Kuwaiti vessel re-registered two weeks ago to carry the U.S. flag, sailed early Saturday morning, according to a reliable shipping source.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 |
Several mortar rounds landed inside a large residential complex near a military base in northern Tehran on Monday, injuring at least four people, witnesses said. An Iraqi-based opposition group claimed responsibility. As many as 10 mortars hit the complex, which contains 360 apartments, witnesses said. Ambulances and fire engines raced out of the complex. Tehran radio also reported the explosions, saying they were from mortar rounds. One person lost his legs, witnesses said.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Former hostages and the families of victims of alleged state-sponsored terrorism appealed Thursday to Congress for help in collecting multimillion-dollar judgments they have been awarded. "The Clinton administration has continued to object to every practical proposal we have made," said Terry Anderson, who won a $341-million federal court award against Iran last month.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | Associated Press
German officials are looking into information from a former top Iranian spy that the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini ordered the December 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, a magazine reported. The weekly Der Spiegel said the tip came from Abolghassem Mesbahi, a co-founder of the Iranian intelligence service who later went into exile.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Libyan intelligence agents may have assembled and planted the bomb that destroyed a Pan Am jumbo jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, in December, 1988, U.S. investigators said after studying newly uncovered evidence, according to a report in the New York Times. Until now, the inquiry has focused on evidence that Iran hired a Syrian-sponsored terrorist group, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command, to bomb the airliner.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite growing evidence that Iran is pushing for an early end to the Lebanon hostage crisis and attempting to ease its international isolation, the Bush Administration is resisting suggestions--some from within its own ranks--that it should move to improve relations with the Islamic republic. For now, the Administration has concluded it should maintain its deep-freeze policy toward Iran, even if all Western hostages are released soon, a senior Administration official said.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An elite military wing in Iran warned pro-reform leaders and the press that any attempt to undermine Iran's Islamic ideology would be met with "Islamic violence." The strongly worded statement by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps conforms to the increasingly strident tone taken by hard-liners against reformists who swept parliamentary elections in February.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Former hostages and the families of victims of alleged state-sponsored terrorism appealed Thursday to Congress for help in collecting multimillion-dollar judgments they have been awarded. "The Clinton administration has continued to object to every practical proposal we have made," said Terry Anderson, who won a $341-million federal court award against Iran last month.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 |
Several mortar rounds landed inside a large residential complex near a military base in northern Tehran on Monday, injuring at least four people, witnesses said. An Iraqi-based opposition group claimed responsibility. As many as 10 mortars hit the complex, which contains 360 apartments, witnesses said. Ambulances and fire engines raced out of the complex. Tehran radio also reported the explosions, saying they were from mortar rounds. One person lost his legs, witnesses said.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
Mortars struck a publishing house Saturday evening in central Tehran, near key government buildings such as the Iranian president's office and parliament. One person was killed and four injured, Iranian television reported. Windows of the Golbang publishing house, located across the street from the judiciary building and top policymaking offices, were shattered and its walls pocked and broken in areas. Two cars parked in front were destroyed in the attack.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
A high-ranking Iranian army commander was killed Saturday morning while on his way to work, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported. Brig. Ali Sayyad Shirazi, deputy chief of the joint staff command of the armed forces, was a senior army commander during Iran's 1980-88 war with Iraq, the agency said. He was assassinated by "terrorists," a common euphemism for the Iraq-based opposition group Moujahedeen Khalq. The agency did not say how Shirazi was killed.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are some events whose significance is knowable only in retrospect. The death last year of Mohammed Jafar Pouyandeh may well have been one of those occurrences: the killing of an obscure translator that could mark a turning point for Iran. Pouyandeh, who was little known outside a small circle of intellectuals and writers, was abducted, strangled and dumped along a railroad track in December.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Iran inexplicably pulled back from plans last summer for a concerted offensive of terrorist attacks on American embassies and other facilities abroad, the State Department's counterterrorism chief said Monday. "There was certainly evidence of planning of attacks on American targets over the summer and into the fall," L. Paul Bremer, director of the Office of Counterterrorism, said in an interview. "We are confident that the intelligence was good intelligence. Why the attacks didn't take place?
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Despite Iran's almost hourly threats of retaliation against the United States in the wake of the downing of the Iranian jetliner on Sunday, Western analysts assessing the threat said Monday that Iran appears to have few options to hit back.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the election of a more moderate government last year, Iran remains the world's worst sponsor of international terrorism, carrying out 13 assassinations in 1997, the State Department reported Thursday. The assessment, included in the department's annual survey of terrorism, is expected to trouble members of Congress, upset Iranian leaders and hamper attempts by both Washington and Tehran to ease their tense and antagonistic relations.
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