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Terrorism Israel

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NEWS
March 8, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the threat of increased international isolation following the recent wave of suicide bombings in Israel, Iran is mounting a diplomatic and public relations offensive to distance itself from the Palestinian militants claiming responsibility and is strongly denying that it gives money or training to the bombers.
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OPINION
February 5, 2004 | Max Boot
Don't deal with terrorists. It's one of those bromides -- like "do unto others" or "floss after every meal" -- that are often mouthed but seldom obeyed. Pretty much every democracy deals with terrorists. Britain has dealt with the IRA, Colombia with the FARC, India with Kashmiri separatists, Israel with the PLO. The United States is no exception.
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NEWS
December 3, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Israeli Supreme Court ruled three months ago against the use of excessive force by state security agents against suspects--what many would call torture--praise was heard worldwide. Inside Israel, however, a new debate was only beginning. A number of senior officials, including Prime Minister Ehud Barak, were worried about depriving security forces of a valuable "tool" in their fight against terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2002 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their first official explanation for detaining an American aid worker, Israeli authorities said in newspaper reports Wednesday that Anaheim doctor Riad Abdelkarim may have been planning to use a U.S. charity to help fund "terror attacks" by the Hamas militant organization. But the Israeli charges were dismissed as "baseless" by another aid worker who was detained with Abdelkarim and released this week after signing papers that will prevent her from returning to Israel.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel released contradictory versions Tuesday of the purpose of last week's foiled Palestinian raid from the sea, adding a bizarre postscript to the guerrilla attack and perhaps complicating the diplomatic response of the United States. Authorities released an interview with one of the Palestinian commandos, identified as Mohammed abu Shaash, who said he was under orders to assault the Sheraton Hotel in Tel Aviv and shoot indiscriminately.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS and EMILY L. HAUSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A powerful bomb, apparently placed by Islamic militants opposed to the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, blew up a crowded bus during the morning rush hour in the heart of Tel Aviv on Wednesday, killing 22 people and wounding 48. The explosion lifted the bus off the pavement and scattered charred bodies of passengers--many of them dismembered--up and down Dizengoff Street, turning cosmopolitan Tel Aviv's central thoroughfare into a slaughterhouse.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Israel has defeated all the Arab armies it has fought, it remains so painfully vulnerable to terrorism that, following the weekend suicide bombing which killed 19, many Israelis despaired Monday of ever seeing peace. "Many are asking me, 'Did you bring peace, or did you bring terror?' " Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin said in a television address as he defended his controversial efforts to make peace with the Palestinians. "I understand the question. The peace process is not easy. . . .
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two latest suicide bombing attacks in Jerusalem have laid bare what some officials call an intelligence "black hole" in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, prompting public debate over whether the country's vaunted security services have become too dependent on the Palestinians in the fight against terrorism.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
A series of apparently random attacks against Jews by Arabs in the last few days has caused a furor in Israel over the state of the country's internal security services and led to calls for tougher action against terrorism. Rafael Eitan, a member of Parliament and a former chief of staff of the Israeli armed forces, has suggested that any Arab who is found with a knife or stick in his pocket "should be killed on the spot." The remark touched off an uproar.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did he blunder and give comfort to Israel's enemies or was he candidly expressing what he and many Israelis in their hearts believe? Either way, Labor Party leader Ehud Barak's remark last week that if he had been born a Palestinian, he might have joined one of the groups fighting Israel has erupted into a major political flap for the former army chief who wants Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's job.
NEWS
March 30, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Israeli tanks rumbled through the compound of Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat on Friday, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell placed the blame for the latest Mideast upheaval squarely on Palestinian terrorists. But he said the United States will forge ahead with its latest diplomatic effort to work out a cease-fire. "Let's be clear about what brought it all to a halt: terrorism," Powell said in an appearance at the State Department. "Terrorism . . .
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Israeli army pulled out of the Palestinian-controlled town of Beit Hanoun late Wednesday, after the most sweeping ground operation in the Gaza Strip since fighting began nearly 17 months ago. Five Palestinian police officers were killed and 18 people were arrested in the raid, which Israel said was a response to Sunday's launch of two rockets into the Negev desert by the militant Islamic group Hamas.
NEWS
February 11, 2002 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palestinian gunmen killed two Israeli soldiers and seriously wounded four other people outside the Israeli army's southern command headquarters in Beersheba on Sunday as Prime Minister Ariel Sharon returned home from Washington.
NEWS
January 18, 2002 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Palestinian militant armed with a gun and grenades burst into a crowded banquet hall in northern Israel late Thursday and opened fire on the dancing guests at a young girl's bat mitzvah. At least six people were shot to death and 30 others were wounded before police and enraged guests overpowered and killed the assailant. The attack in the city of Hadera came as a relative lull in violence evaporated, along with hopes for a breakthrough after more than 15 months of bloodletting.
NEWS
January 3, 2002 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the return to the region today of the United States' special Middle East envoy, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon faces new pressure to move into broader diplomatic talks with the Palestinians--something he has steadfastly resisted. Retired Marine Corps Gen. Anthony C. Zinni will be picking up the pieces of his earlier peace-seeking mission, which coincided with a surge in violence before ending in failure last month. The U.S.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government, alarmed at some of the worst Israeli-Palestinian violence in months, recalled its special Mideast envoy Saturday for consultations after his attempts to broker a cease-fire failed, while the Israeli army hunted the Gaza Strip for Palestinians suspected of terror activity. Israeli armor and infantry killed five Palestinians in a daylong sweep through the northern Gaza Strip town of Beit Hanoun and in Rafah to the south.
NEWS
March 25, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When construction of a new Jewish neighborhood began in traditionally Arab East Jerusalem last week, Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat warned Israel: Peace and settlements cannot coexist. Days later, a Palestinian suicide bomber blew up a Tel Aviv cafe, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu accused Arafat of having given a green light to terrorists. There can be no peace with terrorism, Netanyahu said.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton late Monday canceled a two-day political trip to California to continue his effort to broker a Middle East peace settlement at the Wye Plantation summit, which goes into a second unscheduled day today. "Given the importance of the issues at hand, the president, Prime Minister Netanyahu and Chairman Arafat believe it is appropriate to stay and continue to work on these important issues," White House Press Secretary Joe Lockhart said. "We will be out here tomorrow.
NEWS
December 14, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli forces bore down on Yasser Arafat and his Palestinian Authority on Thursday, moving armor to within easy shooting range of his headquarters as fighter aircraft pounded this and other Palestinian cities late into the night. Armored Israeli bulldozers demolished Palestinian television and radio transmission facilities in a bid to silence the Voice of Palestine. Troops occupied towns across the West Bank and searched Palestinian homes.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wednesday's commando-style attacks on Jewish settlers have finally given Israel the grounds it long sought to relegate Yasser Arafat to political oblivion--and may have doomed America's belated effort to avert an expanded war in the Middle East. Israel early today severed ties with Arafat, declaring that he essentially no longer exists as far as it is concerned, and launched wide-scale military attacks on Palestinian cities and villages across the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
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