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March 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Special agents have arrested Stefano Delle Chiaie, an Italian neo-fascist sought for the bombing deaths of more than 100 people and other crimes, Col. Porfirio Valera, security police commander, announced Sunday. Delle Chiaie, a fugitive for 17 years, was one of the world's most wanted men. Valera said Delle Chiaie will be deported to Italy after Venezuelan authorities finish interrogating him. He has been on trial in Italy in his absence in connection with the Aug.
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NEWS
October 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Embassy in Rome warned that "symbols of American capitalism" in Italy may be targets of terrorist attacks. The embassy did not cite any specific businesses or institutions but said the State Department "has received information that U.S. businesses in Italy may be targeted for attack in the next month."
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NEWS
December 16, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The lone survivor of the four-member Arab commando unit that opened fire in a Rome airport almost two years ago went on trial Tuesday and accused Israeli security agents of being equally responsible for the 16 people killed. "I did not come here to ask forgiveness," 20-year-old Ibrahim Khaled said. "I came here to explain how the massacre happened."
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Italian officials were warned in July that Islamic terrorists might attempt to kill President Bush and other leaders by crashing an airliner into the Genoa summit of industrialized nations, officials said Wednesday. Italian officials took the reports seriously enough to prompt extraordinary precautions during the July summit of the Group of 8 nations, including closing the airspace over Genoa and stationing antiaircraft guns at the city's airport. But a U.S.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A car bomb exploded Thursday night in front of a club for U.S. military personnel in Naples, killing a U.S. Navy enlisted woman and four Italians and injuring at least 17 people, officials said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the blast that happened shortly after 8 p.m. at the USO club. A Pentagon spokeswoman said the American woman was stationed at the Naval Communications Area Master Station in Naples. Lt.
NEWS
April 16, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Italian police hunted a wanted Japanese terrorist Friday and warned that the bomb he is believed to have planted outside a USO club in Naples could signal a new round of attacks against American targets. "We must be alert," said Ansoino Andreassi, chief of Italy's anti-terrorist police. "This kind of attack comes in an international context. There have been anti-U.S. attacks in other countries. We can't say we have heard the last word." Four Italian passers-by and a U.S.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
Terrorists exploded a car bomb near the U.S. Embassy in Rome and fired rockets into the American and British embassy compounds Tuesday, apparently to protest the economic summit conference here.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interior Minister Nicola Mancino warned Italy's police chiefs of the danger of new acts of subversion after bombs in Rome and Milan killed five people. Authorities have mainly pointed a finger at the Mafia as being responsible for the five bombings since May 14, but have said former members of the secret services could also be involved. A new success was reported in the hunt for the killers who blew up Mafia-busting judge Paolo Borsellino in July, 1992.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Letters threatening harm to students at U.S. university branches in Italy if Iraq is attacked appear to be a bad practical joke, U.S. officials said Wednesday. "American and Italian officials now believe the letters were a hoax," said a State Department official, who asked to remain unidentified. "There is strong doubt that we will ever uncover who wrote the letters."
NEWS
November 25, 1988
A top aide to Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi began a visit to Italy that is seen as part of a Libyan campaign to shed its image of supporting terrorism. Abdel-Salam Jalloud is the highest-ranking Libyan to visit Rome officially since the firing of a Libyan missile at an Italian island hours after the U.S. bombing of Tripoli in April, 1986. Jalloud conferred with Prime Minister Ciriaco De Mita and is also expected to see Pope John Paul II, whom he has met before on previous visits.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Italian police defused a crudely made bomb near the U.S. Consulate in Florence. Consulate security guards found the device--a shoe box containing an explosive in a plastic bag with two wires attached--on the street. They notified police. The bomb caused no damage, consulate official David Engel said. No one immediately claimed responsibility, but a note with anti-American, anti-capitalist and anti-Israeli phrases was found near the device.
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Three men were sentenced to life in prison for the 1969 bombing at a bank in Milan, Italy, that left 16 people dead and opened a two-decade wave of terrorism in the nation. Delfo Zorzi, Carlo Maria Maggi and Giancarlo Rognoni, members of the neo-fascist New Order group, were convicted in the blast, which injured more than 80 people. Zorzi lives in Japan, which has refused to extradite him.
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion ripped through the Rome offices of the communist daily Il Manifesto, injuring the suspected bomber, said Italy's interior minister. The blast shook the building, located in an area packed with shoppers. Interior Minister Enzo Bianco said the suspect, Andrea Insabato, 41, was known to authorities as a veteran right-wing extremist. The blast raised concerns of a return to political violence four months before a general election.
NEWS
May 21, 1999 | Associated Press
Gunmen waiting in ambush killed a top government aide as he walked to work Thursday, and investigators gave credence to claims of responsibility by the Red Brigades, leftists who terrorized Italy in the 1970s and early 1980s. Massimo D'Antona, a close advisor to Italy's labor minister, was shot by at least two young men several blocks from his home near central Rome.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | Associated Press
Italy's military intelligence agency has warned that the country's international airports and Pope John Paul II could be the targets of Islamic terrorists, Italian media reported Friday. The warning was issued late Thursday at a meeting of Italy's intelligence and security agencies. It comes amid souring relations between Western Europe and Iran after a German court ruling blamed Iran's top leaders for the 1992 murders of Kurdish dissidents in Berlin.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interior Minister Nicola Mancino warned Italy's police chiefs of the danger of new acts of subversion after bombs in Rome and Milan killed five people. Authorities have mainly pointed a finger at the Mafia as being responsible for the five bombings since May 14, but have said former members of the secret services could also be involved. A new success was reported in the hunt for the killers who blew up Mafia-busting judge Paolo Borsellino in July, 1992.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | JANET STOBART and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Angry and bewildered, Italians are finding it easier to understand the intent than to guess the identity of the new breed of terrorists striking at the heart of their national, cultural and religious heritage. Bombs that irreparably damaged two of Rome's landmark churches Tuesday "struck a blow at the heart of Christianity," in the words of Pope John Paul II.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Viewing the damage wrought by two of three bombs that ripped through Italy's main cities the night before, Pope John Paul II and Italian President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro mourned together here Wednesday. Three explosions had echoed through Rome and Milan around midnight Tuesday, leaving five dead and about 40 wounded. Police are searching for clues to the identity of the authors of these and other tragic explosions that have struck Italian cities in the last three months.
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