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Terrorism Nigeria

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NEWS
January 8, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A bomb exploded in Lagos near a bus filled with soldiers, state-run radio and witnesses said. The exact casualty toll was not immediately known, but the News Agency of Nigeria quoted witnesses as saying they saw one soldier killed and at least 15 people wounded. Radio later reported that a schoolboy also was killed, but there was no official confirmation. The blast was the fourth in the city in the last two months. Nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks.
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NEWS
September 28, 1997 | FRANK AIGBOGUN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Firebombings, bloody gang battles, extortion rackets. Across Nigeria, these are part of campus life at universities terrorized by student members of violent secret societies. At least 20 killings in the last two years have been blamed on the dozen or so groups, among them Black Ax, the Buccaneers and the Green Berets. Society members fight rival gangs and prey upon professors and students who are not members.
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NEWS
September 28, 1997 | FRANK AIGBOGUN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Firebombings, bloody gang battles, extortion rackets. Across Nigeria, these are part of campus life at universities terrorized by student members of violent secret societies. At least 20 killings in the last two years have been blamed on the dozen or so groups, among them Black Ax, the Buccaneers and the Green Berets. Society members fight rival gangs and prey upon professors and students who are not members.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A bomb exploded in Lagos near a bus filled with soldiers, state-run radio and witnesses said. The exact casualty toll was not immediately known, but the News Agency of Nigeria quoted witnesses as saying they saw one soldier killed and at least 15 people wounded. Radio later reported that a schoolboy also was killed, but there was no official confirmation. The blast was the fourth in the city in the last two months. Nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks.
WORLD
August 26, 2011 | By John Ndukauba and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
At least 18 people were killed Friday when a suicide bomber smashed a car through the gates of the U.N. headquarters in the Nigerian capital, Abuja, raising fears that a homegrown Islamic militant group inspired by the Taliban is widening its attacks to include Western targets. A spokesman for Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the attack, the most serious by the group, which is based in Nigeria's Muslim majority north and that some believe is forging links to Al Qaeda. "More attacks are on the way, and by the will of Allah we will have unfettered access to wherever we want to attack," the spokesman, Abu Darda, said by phone.
WORLD
September 12, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The world joined the United States on Wednesday in remembering the horror and recognizing the repercussions of Sept. 11. People in many nations mourned the loss of lives and of an image of the United States that had perhaps been an illusion. "America for many was the place where dreams get fulfilled, a place where people thought nothing bad can happen," said Katarzyna Lasocik, 39, a Polish marketing manager who paid her respects at the U.S. Embassy in Warsaw. "This feeling was crushed."
WORLD
September 13, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The signs are ominous: A terrorist group in northern Nigeria claims to have trained with Al Qaeda-linked militants in Somalia, and vows to launch international attacks after a deadly bombing last month of the U.N. headquarters in Nigeria's capital, Abuja. The head of U.S. Africa Command, Gen. Carter F. Ham, has warned of the threat of a pan-African Al Qaeda-linked terrorism network capable of endangering Western interests across the continent. And Nigerian intelligence experts have suggested that another Al Qaeda affiliate in the region, Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, or AQIM, may be supplying personnel, weapons and training to the Nigerian group, Boko Haram.
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