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Terrorism Panama

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NEWS
March 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A bomb tossed through the window of a downtown discotheque wounded 16 American servicemen, one seriously, military and hospital officials said Saturday. Eleven Panamanians were also hurt. It is believed to be the first such attack on U.S. servicemen since the United States invaded Panama on Dec. 20 and overthrew the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. Two victims of the blast quoted witnesses of the attack late Friday at the My Place nightclub as saying the attacker shouted "Viva Noriega!"
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NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A terrorist group has claimed responsibility for the fatal crash of two U.S. helicopters and the grenade attack on a discotheque, and it threatened more attacks on Americans and U.S. property. The group calls itself the Dec. 20 Movement, or M-20, and is the first terrorist group to surface following the Dec. 20 U.S. invasion that overthrew dictator Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. One U.S. soldier died in the March 2 grenade attack, and 11 died in the Feb. 21 air crashes. The U.S.
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NEWS
December 23, 1989
The Fighting Armed bands said by U.S. military officials to be directed by ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega staged a bloody attack less than a mile from the American military headquarters. Firing mortars, machine guns and automatic rifles, the attackers hit Panama's national police headquarters. American forces were caught by surprise and several people were wounded amid the confusion. Panama City Looters ransacked stores for the third day.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
An American soldier died of his wounds from a late-night grenade attack on a Panama City nightclub popular with U.S. soldiers, the U.S. Southern Command said. Army Specialist Anthony B. Ward, 21, of Houston, suffered chest and abdominal wounds when a hand grenade was hurled into the My Place nightclub late Friday. Ward was among 16 U.S. military personnel wounded. At least 12 Panamanians were also injured.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | KENNETH FREED and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Armed bands said by U.S. military officials to be directed by ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega staged a bloody attack Friday in downtown Panama City near the American military headquarters and frustrated efforts by U.S. troops to pacify this city. Firing mortars, machine guns and automatic rifles, the attackers hit Panama's national police headquarters, less than a mile from the headquarters of the U.S. Southern Command, about 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Crying and pulling at her hair, a woman in high heels picked her way through mobs of looters on the crowded Via Espana. "They put a gun to my head and stole my car!" she shrieked. Around the corner at a neighborhood grocery store, a businessman, frantic and frightened, drew a revolver from his pocket. "I've never used one of these in my life," he muttered, "but we are protecting our building."
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Torn by the invasion of American troops, the capital of Panama erupted into chaos Thursday as panic, gunfire and lawlessness swept the city. Because the Panamanian army, which doubled as domestic police, had fallen in defeat, roving gangs of thugs--many of them loyalists of strongman Manuel A. Noriega--took to the streets, terrorizing countrymen and foreigners alike.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A terrorist group has claimed responsibility for the fatal crash of two U.S. helicopters and the grenade attack on a discotheque, and it threatened more attacks on Americans and U.S. property. The group calls itself the Dec. 20 Movement, or M-20, and is the first terrorist group to surface following the Dec. 20 U.S. invasion that overthrew dictator Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. One U.S. soldier died in the March 2 grenade attack, and 11 died in the Feb. 21 air crashes. The U.S.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are young, unemployed and violent, prone to prowl the streets looking for trouble. After creating them last year, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega touted the Batallon Dignidad , or Dignity Battalion, as a youth group of patriotic Panamanians. Other observers contend that they are armed thugs embraced by Noriega because they, unlike his military forces, can be counted on to kill civilians without reservation. Today, they stand as a leading obstacle to U.S.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
An American soldier died of his wounds from a late-night grenade attack on a Panama City nightclub popular with U.S. soldiers, the U.S. Southern Command said. Army Specialist Anthony B. Ward, 21, of Houston, suffered chest and abdominal wounds when a hand grenade was hurled into the My Place nightclub late Friday. Ward was among 16 U.S. military personnel wounded. At least 12 Panamanians were also injured.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A bomb tossed through the window of a downtown discotheque wounded 16 American servicemen, one seriously, military and hospital officials said Saturday. Eleven Panamanians were also hurt. It is believed to be the first such attack on U.S. servicemen since the United States invaded Panama on Dec. 20 and overthrew the government of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. Two victims of the blast quoted witnesses of the attack late Friday at the My Place nightclub as saying the attacker shouted "Viva Noriega!"
NEWS
December 23, 1989
The Fighting Armed bands said by U.S. military officials to be directed by ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega staged a bloody attack less than a mile from the American military headquarters. Firing mortars, machine guns and automatic rifles, the attackers hit Panama's national police headquarters. American forces were caught by surprise and several people were wounded amid the confusion. Panama City Looters ransacked stores for the third day.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | KENNETH FREED and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Armed bands said by U.S. military officials to be directed by ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega staged a bloody attack Friday in downtown Panama City near the American military headquarters and frustrated efforts by U.S. troops to pacify this city. Firing mortars, machine guns and automatic rifles, the attackers hit Panama's national police headquarters, less than a mile from the headquarters of the U.S. Southern Command, about 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Crying and pulling at her hair, a woman in high heels picked her way through mobs of looters on the crowded Via Espana. "They put a gun to my head and stole my car!" she shrieked. Around the corner at a neighborhood grocery store, a businessman, frantic and frightened, drew a revolver from his pocket. "I've never used one of these in my life," he muttered, "but we are protecting our building."
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Torn by the invasion of American troops, the capital of Panama erupted into chaos Thursday as panic, gunfire and lawlessness swept the city. Because the Panamanian army, which doubled as domestic police, had fallen in defeat, roving gangs of thugs--many of them loyalists of strongman Manuel A. Noriega--took to the streets, terrorizing countrymen and foreigners alike.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are young, unemployed and violent, prone to prowl the streets looking for trouble. After creating them last year, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega touted the Batallon Dignidad , or Dignity Battalion, as a youth group of patriotic Panamanians. Other observers contend that they are armed thugs embraced by Noriega because they, unlike his military forces, can be counted on to kill civilians without reservation. Today, they stand as a leading obstacle to U.S.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First came American gunships, thundering through the night, pounding their way toward the strongman's lair. On loudspeakers, crews shouted to residents around army headquarters: Evacuate! From wooden homes in the slums surrounding Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's Panama Defense Forces compound in Panama City, men, women and children scurried out into the streets, fear in their eyes, the first refugees of the fight.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First came American gunships, thundering through the night, pounding their way toward the strongman's lair. On loudspeakers, crews shouted to residents around army headquarters: Evacuate! From wooden homes in the slums surrounding Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's Panama Defense Forces compound in Panama City, men, women and children scurried out into the streets, fear in their eyes, the first refugees of the fight.
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