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Terrorism Sudan

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NEWS
June 20, 1988
Five men charged with killing two Sudanese and five Britons in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum last month told a Sudanese court they were Palestinians. Officials said the five, who identified themselves in court simply as "fighters for the Arab cause," had Lebanese passports and had confessed to being trained in Lebanon's Syrian-controlled Bekaa Valley. Police have said they had targeted Americans and Britons in Sudan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 7, 2001 | GAYLE SMITH
One of the mistakes all too frequently made by the outside world is to assume that because the regime in Sudan is bad it is incapable of fooling the good guys. The regime, however, has been anything but ineffective. Quite the contrary, it is frequently brilliant, always clever and too often successfully manipulative. Its most successful ploy has been to turn on its head the adage "actions speak louder than words." "We stand for peace," the government says.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The body of a a French citizen killed when a relief plane was shot down Dec. 21 in southern Sudan exploded at the airport in Khartoum, the Sudanese capital, as it was about to be loaded on a plane for Paris. Sources who reported the incident said they believed the body had been booby-trapped to explode in the air. The blast burned the driver of the truck carrying the body. Four relief workers died when their plane was downed in a rebel area near Aweil, about 590 miles southwest of Khartoum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1998 | FRANCIS M. DENG, Francis M. Deng, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, was formerly Sudan's minister of state for foreign affairs and its ambassador to the United States, Scandinavian countries and Canada
Fighting terrorism is admittedly a complex and difficult enterprise with serious political and moral dilemmas. Obviously, terrorists must be punished and if necessary, eliminated. But if this means using terroristic methods, then we must question the objective. Is it to avenge, to eliminate or to deter the potential for more terrorism? Vengeance is an understandable impulse, but it occupies a lower moral ground. Elimination is strategically all but impossible.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sudan's military ruler dismissed accusations by Washington that his country supports international terrorism as "political bias" and said it only advocates Islam. By adding Sudan to its list of countries supporting terrorism, Washington severed Sudan from its assistance programs, with the exception of humanitarian aid.
OPINION
December 7, 2001 | GAYLE SMITH
One of the mistakes all too frequently made by the outside world is to assume that because the regime in Sudan is bad it is incapable of fooling the good guys. The regime, however, has been anything but ineffective. Quite the contrary, it is frequently brilliant, always clever and too often successfully manipulative. Its most successful ploy has been to turn on its head the adage "actions speak louder than words." "We stand for peace," the government says.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Suspected terrorists accused of plotting an unprecedented wave of attacks in Manhattan intended to use special diplomatic license plates to drive a car bomb into the basement parking garage of the United Nations, government sources said Friday. The information emerged as federal agents examined whether Sudanese diplomats provided support to some of the eight alleged co-conspirators arrested in the abortive scheme a day earlier. Sudanese officials vehemently denied any involvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1998 | FRANCIS M. DENG, Francis M. Deng, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, was formerly Sudan's minister of state for foreign affairs and its ambassador to the United States, Scandinavian countries and Canada
Fighting terrorism is admittedly a complex and difficult enterprise with serious political and moral dilemmas. Obviously, terrorists must be punished and if necessary, eliminated. But if this means using terroristic methods, then we must question the objective. Is it to avenge, to eliminate or to deter the potential for more terrorism? Vengeance is an understandable impulse, but it occupies a lower moral ground. Elimination is strategically all but impossible.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The United States will recognize southern Sudan as a new, independent country in July, President Obama announced Monday. The announcement, which had been expected, came on the day that officials formally announced that 98% of the votes cast in the Jan. 9 referendum supported splitting Sudan into separate countries. More than 2 million people died during the civil war, which officially ended in a 2005 peace agreement. “On behalf of the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of southern Sudan for a successful and inspiring referendum in which an overwhelmingly majority of voters chose independence,” Obama said in a prepared statement.
OPINION
November 8, 2004 | Thomas Donnelly and Vance Serchuk, Thomas Donnelly and Vance Serchuk are, respectively, resident fellow and research associate at the American Enterprise Institute.
As Americans gathered peaceably to vote on Tuesday, Sudanese soldiers and police were storming the Al Jeer Sureaf refugee camp in the western province of Darfur, beating and tear-gassing its 5,000 inhabitants, burning their makeshift shelters and forcing at least 250 families into trucks for forced relocation.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sudan's military ruler dismissed accusations by Washington that his country supports international terrorism as "political bias" and said it only advocates Islam. By adding Sudan to its list of countries supporting terrorism, Washington severed Sudan from its assistance programs, with the exception of humanitarian aid.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Suspected terrorists accused of plotting an unprecedented wave of attacks in Manhattan intended to use special diplomatic license plates to drive a car bomb into the basement parking garage of the United Nations, government sources said Friday. The information emerged as federal agents examined whether Sudanese diplomats provided support to some of the eight alleged co-conspirators arrested in the abortive scheme a day earlier. Sudanese officials vehemently denied any involvement.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The body of a a French citizen killed when a relief plane was shot down Dec. 21 in southern Sudan exploded at the airport in Khartoum, the Sudanese capital, as it was about to be loaded on a plane for Paris. Sources who reported the incident said they believed the body had been booby-trapped to explode in the air. The blast burned the driver of the truck carrying the body. Four relief workers died when their plane was downed in a rebel area near Aweil, about 590 miles southwest of Khartoum.
NEWS
June 20, 1988
Five men charged with killing two Sudanese and five Britons in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum last month told a Sudanese court they were Palestinians. Officials said the five, who identified themselves in court simply as "fighters for the Arab cause," had Lebanese passports and had confessed to being trained in Lebanon's Syrian-controlled Bekaa Valley. Police have said they had targeted Americans and Britons in Sudan.
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