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Terrorism United States

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NEWS
May 3, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the trial of Timothy J. McVeigh presented evidence and testimony Friday that suggested McVeigh and Terry L. Nichols made two large purchases of highly explosive ammonium nitrate fertilizer in the months before the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City.
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NEWS
April 28, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ROBERT PATRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The MD-88 passenger jetliner was cruising above 25,000 feet but there was no one at the controls. Preoccupied with protecting the cockpit door while they took turns going to the bathroom, the pilots momentarily forgot the cardinal safety rule that the captain or the co-pilot must be strapped in and in control of the aircraft at all times. The November incident illustrates an emerging safety issue: The focus on aviation security since Sept.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jokey cliche that your waiter also is an actor has acquired an unfunny edge since Sept. 11. The decline in major sectors of New York's economy since the terrorist attacks means that performers, who always struggle for theatrical work, now are scrambling for traditional "survival jobs" as well. Actor Marco Kujovic, for example, lost his waiting job at the Grill Room in the World Financial Center, a popular dining spot that closed after the World Trade Center disaster next door.
NEWS
April 28, 2002
This is a list of names added to the total of confirmed dead in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This list, released since April 19, updates accounts that have appeared in The Times each Sunday since Sept. 11. The number of people unaccounted for, according to New York City officials and Associated Press, is now believed to be 128. Vincent Brunton Patrick Byrne Thomas Farino Robert Hamilton Scott Larsen Salvatore P. Lopes Michael Otten Josh Piver Edward Rall Barrington L. Young
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheila Marie Ornedo, heavy with child, is due to give birth in February. The Los Angeles nurse is alone this Christmas, preparing for her baby girl's arrival without Ruben, her husband, by her side. Ruben is the one who should be massaging her aching back, as he used to; picking her up from work at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and taking her out to dinner, as he used to. He should be helping to fix up the nursery, as he was going to.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major crackdown on a Palestinian terrorist organization in the United States, four reputed members have been indicted on racketeering charges that include the killing of a teen-age daughter of one of them to silence her, conspiring to murder Jews and discussing the possibility of blowing up the Israeli Embassy here. The indictment, unsealed Thursday by a federal grand jury in St. Louis, marked the first legal action against the shadowy Abu Nidal organization here.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | DANA CALVO and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The people who head Hollywood's media conglomerates are not accustomed to taking meetings without knowing the agenda. But that's exactly what they will do Sunday as about 40 of them sit down in Beverly Hills for brunch with Karl Rove, President Bush's senior advisor. In broad strokes, the White House has said it wants the involvement of the entertainment industry in the campaign against terrorism. There have been hints of having Hollywood create public service announcements.
SPORTS
September 14, 2001 | MILTON KENT, THE BALTIMORE SUN
For 12 years, Dave Szott has looked forward to suiting up on every Sunday in the fall and getting into the trenches with the rest of his offensive line mates to get down and dirty. But, as the NFL is taking its first regular-season Sunday off for reasons other than labor disputes, Szott, the Washington Redskins' starting right guard, will look forward to some down time to reflect on what has been a tumultuous week for himself and his family.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timothy J. McVeigh was found guilty Monday of the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history and jurors now will decide whether the 29-year-old former soldier should die for bombing the Oklahoma City federal building two years ago. At 1:34 p.m., U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch read the verdict to a hushed and crowded second-floor courtroom in downtown Denver: guilty on each of the 11 counts of the indictment.
NEWS
September 16, 2001
These are the names of the terrorists' victims identified so far Dead World Trade Center David Berry Pamela Boyce Daniel Brethel Andrew Brunn Stephen Colaio Peter Corroll Robert Cruikshank Joyce Cummings Robert Curatolo Jack D'Ambrosio Andrew Desperito William Feehan Julio Fernandez Peter Ganci Tommy Hannafin Timothy Haskell George Howard Walter Hynes John Iskyan Rev. Mychal Judge Mcheffey Keith John Keohane Eugene Lazar Joseph Livera Michael McCabe Robert G.
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | From Associated Press
Zacarias Moussaoui, the man indicted as a Sept. 11 accomplice, tried to speak with prosecutors about the death penalty and classified information but they refused, the government said Thursday. Prosecutors said they were informed of the request Tuesday by a jail official, an indication that Moussaoui, who wants to represent himself in the case, is already trying to do so. Moussaoui, however, cannot make that decision on his own. U.S.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A defiant Zacarias Moussaoui--the only person charged in the United States with terrorism in connection with the Sept. 11 attacks--told a judge Monday that he wants to represent himself in a trial without a jury, and called for the destruction of America and Jews everywhere. Moussaoui's fiery remarks appeared to surprise even his own court-appointed defense team. They came during what was supposed to be a routine hearing before U.S.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
Chantyl Peterson bursts through the front door, greets her mother and slings her schoolbooks onto the floor. She's a healthy seventh-grader who loves horseback riding and playing the flute and doesn't mind homework. Nine years ago, she was dying. A New York City firefighter saved her life back then, but not in the usual way. His bone marrow was a perfect match for the little Nevada girl, then 5 and badly needing a transplant.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microbiologists, like nature, abhor a vacuum, and in the absence of an FBI arrest in last fall's anthrax attacks, some of the nation's top scientists are offering their own theories.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | From Associated Press
A patched and battle-ready guided missile destroyer Cole returned to duty with a flag-waving, horn-blasting send-off Friday, a year and a half after a terrorist bombing in Yemen blew a hole in its side and killed 17 sailors. Hundreds of people cheered along the shore as the Cole, gleaming in the sunlight, set off from Northrop Grumman Corp.'s Ingalls Shipyard for its home port in Norfolk, Va. The Cole returns to duty after 14 months of repairs and improvements.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid warnings that another terrorist strike might come tucked inside one of the 17,000 cargo containers that enter the United States each day, researchers are scrambling to make the nondescript metal boxes--and their modes of delivery--tamper-proof.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
NEWS
February 15, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Air Force targeters in Afghanistan spotted a Taliban convoy rumbling along a road near Kandahar on a dark October night, they asked permission to strike. A Pentagon lawyer advised against it, fearing civilians might be killed. The convoy moved forward, allowing the Taliban to reinforce troops faced off against the U.S.-backed Northern Alliance. A week earlier, it was a lawyer, operating at the right hand of commanding Gen. Tommy R.
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