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Terrorism United States

NEWS
March 26, 2002 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's 103 nuclear power reactors are vulnerable to a potentially catastrophic terrorist attack but have taken few safety countermeasures since Sept. 11, even though they have been targeted by Al Qaeda, a congressman alleged in a report released Monday. In the document--which was immediately discounted by the nuclear power industry--Rep. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.
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NEWS
March 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
As the government waged a "zero tolerance" policy against aviation security lapses after the Sept. 11 attacks, investigators were able to get knives, guns and fake bombs past airport baggage- and passenger-screening checkpoints, a government source said Monday.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brother and mother of accused Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui said Monday that they were refusing to answer questions from a U.S. prosecutor because the investigation and impending trial of their relative could result in the death penalty. Abd Samad Moussaoui, the brother of the 33-year-old Frenchman suspected of being the "20th hijacker" in the attacks, met Monday with a U.S. prosecutor and an FBI agent in Montpellier in southern France.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Thursday that he will seek $5 billion over three years in new assistance to developing nations, but to qualify the countries must root out corruption, demonstrate support for human rights and promote democratic and economic reforms. He also linked his aid proposal to the war on terrorism, asserting that poverty and misery can lead to hopelessness and despair--conditions that he said can help breed terrorism.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S.-led Operation Anaconda has failed to produce any top Al Qaeda leaders, and an American commander said Thursday that the terrorist network's upper echelon might not have been in the Shahi Kot valley when the battle began. But even without apparently capturing its ultimate quarry--terrorist leader Osama bin Laden--the biggest U.S.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a light snow fell at dusk, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell showed up at the busy subway station on Pushkin Square here to place a bouquet of red roses beneath a plaque marking the spot where a suitcase bomb killed 13 and injured dozens Aug. 8, 2000. Powell bowed his head as Russian TV cameras filmed the scene. The brief ceremony last December contrasted sharply with President Clinton's visit here barely a month after the attack. Clinton never went near the site.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several leading Senate Democrats voiced concern Tuesday with a Pentagon plan that calls for the development of new breeds of nuclear weapons and an expansion of the list of nations against whom such warheads might be used. But as the administration continued to downplay the aggressive tone of the so-called Nuclear Posture Review, there were also abundant signs that many lawmakers from both parties are prepared to consider profound changes to the nation's nuclear contingency plans.
NEWS
March 11, 2002 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was during Sunday school at St. Mark's Lutheran Church that Janice Vogel finally got angry. Her husband, Fritz, had been away from their Birdsboro, Pa., home for months. The Air Force recalled Fritz to active duty Oct. 21 to manage construction projects at an air base in New Jersey, part of the call-up in support of U.S. forces in Afghanistan. That was bad enough. But Fritz Vogel owns his own business, a small welding firm.
NEWS
March 11, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN and ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weary and sunburned but proud, 400 American soldiers who fought tenacious battles with Al Qaeda and Taliban troops in eastern Afghanistan returned here Sunday, some of them telling bitter stories of being let down by an Afghan commander. The troops represent about a third of the U.S. force sent to battle Taliban and Al Qaeda holdouts in the mountainous Shahi Kot region in a campaign dubbed Operation Anaconda.
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