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Terrorism United States

NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
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NEWS
February 10, 2002 | WILLIAM M. ARKIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Washington was awash in numbers last week as President Bush unveiled his 2003 budget, including $379 billion for the Pentagon--the largest increase since Vietnam. But another set of numbers was not unveiled, even though it lies at the heart of far-reaching decisions that are being made about the future of U.S. military power. Far from being given to the public, these numbers are considered so sensitive that most senior military officers are not privy to them.
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban foreign minister turned himself in to officials in the southern Afghan city of Kandahar on Friday, becoming the highest-ranking such official to do so, a U.S. defense official said. Wakil Ahmed Mutawakel was transferred to the U.S. military base at the city's airport, where he was being held Friday night, Lt. Col. Martin Compton said.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | PAUL WATSON and SIDHARTHA BARUA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A dingy, overcrowded cellblock in the bowels of New Delhi's Tihar jail was the perfect spot for a merger between militant Islam and the Indian mafia. Ahmad Omar Sayed Sheikh, a chess-playing Islamic radical, made common cause with Aftab Ansari, an ambitious Calcutta gangster, when they did time together behind Tihar's high walls in the late 1990s, according to Indian police investigators.
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Majid Korni is sipping a cup of Dunkin' Donuts coffee, his mobile phone resting beside a makeshift ashtray where a Marlboro slowly burns. His eyes casually take inventory of the Faisaliah mall, looking past the food court and the storefronts as he searches for love. All around are women, veiled from head to toe in the traditional Islamic black gown. But a few yards away are the brown-robed religious police who enforce Saudi society's strict moral codes.
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly five months after deadly attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the nation's top intelligence officials said Wednesday that Osama bin Laden's terrorist network has been badly damaged around the world but still plans further attacks against America and its allies. "We know they'll hurt us again," George J. Tenet, head of the CIA and the national intelligence community, warned the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence in his first public appearance before Congress since Sept.
NEWS
February 6, 2002 | PETER H. KING and GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the floor of Montana's Bitterroot Valley, so far, far away from lower Manhattan, Jane Ellis finds herself on the front lines of a war she never contemplated, trying to prepare for attacks she can barely imagine. Ellis directs the county Office of Emergency Management in Missoula. On a fine, crisp day, she showed a visitor around her piece of the American homeland, pointing out possible terrorist targets: the shopping mall and public waterworks, government buildings and chemical storehouses.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Addressing European allies' concerns that the war against terrorism lacks legal legitimacy, U.S. officials claimed Sunday to be waging an irreproachable battle of good against evil. At the conclusion of a two-day security brainstorming session here that exposed deep rifts between Washington and its European partners, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman likened the campaign to the righteous struggles in the last century against fascism and totalitarian rule.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A confidential intelligence report issued Thursday indicates that Osama bin Laden's operatives displayed a keen interest in exploiting vulnerabilities in security at sensitive U.S. facilities, and FBI Director Robert Mueller said he believes that Al Qaeda-trained agents are still at large in the United States. The intelligence report, reviewed by The Times, revealed that U.S.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The developer who holds the lease to the World Trade Center property is completing the first comprehensive master plan for the 16-acre site that sources say would consist of a number of office buildings clustered around a single soaring tower, a memorial park and two cultural venues. Designed by David Childs of Skidmore Owings & Merrill, one of New York City's most established firms, the plan will be presented by developer Larry Silverstein to the Lower Manhattan Development Corp.
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