Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTerrorism United States
IN THE NEWS

Terrorism United States

NEWS
February 26, 2002 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Italian police released information Monday about nine Moroccan immigrants who were ordered held on charges of subversive association after a judge agreed that they may have been plotting to send lethal gas into the U.S. Embassy or to poison its water supply. But after interrogating the Moroccans for nearly a week, police told U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 25, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite protestations by the Pentagon that it wants no part of the peacekeeping mission in Afghanistan, the military campaign has itself evolved into an elaborate police action aimed at quieting local warlords, securing the country's fledgling government and protecting the more than 4,000 U.S. troops in the country against sniper fire.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | Associated Press
One new name, Sushil Solanki, was added in recent days to the list of confirmed dead in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This list updates accounts that have appeared in The Times each Sunday since Sept. 11. The number of people unaccounted for, according to New York City officials, is now believed to be 166.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shivering in the dark outside his uncle's mud house, Nazak punched a number into a $1,500 telephone, angled the phone's antenna south toward a communications satellite over the Indian Ocean, and pressed "OK." "Salaam aleikum," rumbled a voice on the other end. "Peace be with you." "Salaam aleikum," the skinny, fine-featured 22-year-old replied in the Afghan style. "I have some coordinates." "Go ahead," the voice said.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
For the first time since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, no new names were added to the weekly list of confirmed dead published each Sunday in The Times. The Associated Press reported Friday that 194 people are still listed as missing from the attacks.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There among the reports of stolen cars and petty burglaries spilling out of the old-fashioned teletype machine at police headquarters in Colonie, N.Y., Monday night was the FBI notice to be on the lookout for 13 suspected terrorists. Next to it sat a new computer terminal dedicated to warning of terrorist threats. It remained silent, not yet operational. The scene reflected the country's uncertainty as Americans grappled with the heightened awareness of potential terrorism.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The FBI warned Monday night that a suspected terrorist from Yemen and as many as 16 associates could be planning an attack against Americans as early as today. The FBI identified the main suspect as Fawaz Yahya Al-Rabeei, a Yemeni national born in Saudi Arabia in 1979. The alert said that an attack could occur in the United States or against U.S. interests in Yemen. It was the most specific of the four nationwide alerts that the FBI has issued since Sept.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here was the U.S. military in Afghanistan: a bearded soldier riding horseback in a storm of desert sand, looking like something out of "Lawrence of Arabia." But instead of a dagger, he carried a global positioning system, a sophisticated radio transmitter and a laser for marking targets. Flying 35,000 feet above him was a Vietnam-era bomber that had seemed headed for the scrap heap--until the Pentagon loaded it with smart bombs and linked its pilot with the guy on horseback. Since Sept.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | WILLIAM M. ARKIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Washington was awash in numbers last week as President Bush unveiled his 2003 budget, including $379 billion for the Pentagon--the largest increase since Vietnam. But another set of numbers was not unveiled, even though it lies at the heart of far-reaching decisions that are being made about the future of U.S. military power. Far from being given to the public, these numbers are considered so sensitive that most senior military officers are not privy to them.
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban foreign minister turned himself in to officials in the southern Afghan city of Kandahar on Friday, becoming the highest-ranking such official to do so, a U.S. defense official said. Wakil Ahmed Mutawakel was transferred to the U.S. military base at the city's airport, where he was being held Friday night, Lt. Col. Martin Compton said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|