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Terrorism United States

NEWS
March 17, 2002 | RICHARD T. COOPER and RICARDO ALONZO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six months after the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, security experts worry that the nationwide effort to make Americans safer has grown seriously unbalanced, with huge resources allocated to some threats and comparatively little to potentially greater dangers. The nation, according to this view, has failed to set priorities--to accept lesser risks in order to avoid greater ones. In the language of emergency medicine, it has forgotten the practice of triage.
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NEWS
March 17, 2002
No names have been added in the last week to the list of confirmed dead in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. The number of people unaccounted for, according to New York City officials, remains 158.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As missions go in this war, pumping gas from a big helicopter to a smaller one isn't among the more glamorous. But this is what Marines from the 13th Expeditionary Unit are doing in the high desert, seven miles west of the front line of the war's bloodiest battle. There is little sign of the enemy, though the Marines aren't so sure about the ragged-looking Afghan locals with Kalashnikovs, just a few hundred shimmery yards across the sand.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Thursday that he will seek $5 billion over three years in new assistance to developing nations, but to qualify the countries must root out corruption, demonstrate support for human rights and promote democratic and economic reforms. He also linked his aid proposal to the war on terrorism, asserting that poverty and misery can lead to hopelessness and despair--conditions that he said can help breed terrorism.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S.-led Operation Anaconda has failed to produce any top Al Qaeda leaders, and an American commander said Thursday that the terrorist network's upper echelon might not have been in the Shahi Kot valley when the battle began. But even without apparently capturing its ultimate quarry--terrorist leader Osama bin Laden--the biggest U.S.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shattered and empty, the mud-brick houses shone blood red in the sunlight. Beyond the village, a small truck sat twisted, black and bullet-riddled. On a hillside, two corpses of enemy fighters lay next to a clothing heap that was in fact the torso of a third--mute testament to the brutality of the battle. For U.S. and Afghan forces, who had waged an intense campaign to clear this mountain redoubt of Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters, it was a day to savor and declare victory.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday defended a politically charged Pentagon proposal to create new types of nuclear weapons and expand the nation's list of potential nuclear targets, saying that a commander in chief "must have all options available." Bush backed the notion of a more flexible nuclear arsenal, suggesting that it is critical to deterring post-Cold War threats to the United States and its allies, even as he said his administration remains committed to nuclear arms reduction.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a light snow fell at dusk, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell showed up at the busy subway station on Pushkin Square here to place a bouquet of red roses beneath a plaque marking the spot where a suitcase bomb killed 13 and injured dozens Aug. 8, 2000. Powell bowed his head as Russian TV cameras filmed the scene. The brief ceremony last December contrasted sharply with President Clinton's visit here barely a month after the attack. Clinton never went near the site.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several leading Senate Democrats voiced concern Tuesday with a Pentagon plan that calls for the development of new breeds of nuclear weapons and an expansion of the list of nations against whom such warheads might be used. But as the administration continued to downplay the aggressive tone of the so-called Nuclear Posture Review, there were also abundant signs that many lawmakers from both parties are prepared to consider profound changes to the nation's nuclear contingency plans.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the Cold War, the purpose of U.S. nuclear weapons was straightforward: to deter an attack on the United States by the other nuclear superpower, the Soviet Union. But now the most frightening threats to American security come not from nuclear powers, but from terrorists such as Osama bin Laden and rogue states such as Iraq.
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