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Terrorism United States

NEWS
January 23, 2002 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dianne Feinstein's staff walked back into their third-floor suite Tuesday morning, it was as though time had stood still. The calendars were turned to Oct. 17, the day the California Democrat and 49 of her colleagues were evacuated from the Hart Senate Office Building in the throes of an anthrax attack. The fax machine had spent weeks spitting out a mountain of missives that no one was there to read, finally sputtering to a stop when the paper ran out.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles agreed Sunday night to consider a petition from civil rights advocates demanding that the U.S. government bring terrorism suspects held at Guantanamo Naval Base before a court and define the charges against them. U.S. District Court Judge A. Howard Matz scheduled a hearing for Tuesday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Carl Vinson, the first U.S. aircraft carrier to wage war on the Al Qaeda terrorist network and its Taliban partners, arrived here Saturday to a hero's welcome and the strains of Lee Greenwood's "God Bless the U.S.A." "We were the right hand of America to get the job done," said Petty Officer 3rd Class Juan Pineda, 22, of Seattle. "It feels good," said Petty Officer 3rd Class Bridgette Shryock, 23, of Chicago. "My parents are proud."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2002 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Sept. 11, state and federal agents thought they were turning the corner in the battle against one of the biggest blights in California's agricultural heartland: the massive, illegal production of methamphetamine. A federal Drug Enforcement Administration program to restrict the supply of the chemical agents used in making the deadly drug was showing impressive results.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Friday denied a request for televised coverage of the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui, the only person charged in connection with the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema said she would not set aside a ban on photographing and broadcasting federal criminal proceedings. The ban "does not violate the constitutional rights of either the public or the broadcast media," she said.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force and Air National Guard are pushing to cut back round-the-clock air patrols over some U.S. cities, saying the unprecedented security flights are straining their planes, pilots and crews, senior Pentagon officials said Friday. "That was never intended to be a permanent thing," said Air Force Secretary James Roche, referring to the 24-hour-a-day homeland defense flights being flown since Sept. 11 over Washington, New York and other cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Predicted logjams failed to materialize at airports in Southern California and across the nation Friday as air traffic moved smoothly despite the imposition of new baggage screening procedures. Lines at many airports were long, but in spite of the start of a three-day holiday weekend, delays usually were no greater than they have been since the September terrorist attacks. Most passengers had anticipated delays and few missed their scheduled flights.
NEWS
January 18, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Closer inspection for bombs hidden in baggage--the first step in building a new aviation security system--begins across the nation today, but the next big deadline facing the government is even more daunting. By the end of the year, 429 airports with regularly scheduled airline service must install machines to detect explosives that would make baggage screening much more secure than the temporary measures announced this week.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors late Wednesday dropped all charges against an Egyptian graduate student accused of lying to investigators about possessing an aviation radio in a hotel overlooking the World Trade Center the day terrorists attacked. A letter filed by the government in U.S. District Court in Manhattan said a private pilot had come forward to say the radio belonged to him, and the claim was legitimate.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a federal fund to compensate relatives of the Sept. 11 dead was announced shortly before Christmas, the average award size--$1.6 million--seemed generous enough to take care of the people left behind. But now that they've read the fine print and done the math, many families--and the lawyers, financial advisors and politicians who serve them--are considerably less satisfied.
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