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Terrorism United States

NEWS
March 12, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Monday marked the six months that have passed since Sept. 11 by detailing the start of the counter-terrorism war's second phase, promising "a sustained campaign . . . anywhere in the world" to deny sanctuaries for those seeking to launch attacks.
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NEWS
March 11, 2002 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was during Sunday school at St. Mark's Lutheran Church that Janice Vogel finally got angry. Her husband, Fritz, had been away from their Birdsboro, Pa., home for months. The Air Force recalled Fritz to active duty Oct. 21 to manage construction projects at an air base in New Jersey, part of the call-up in support of U.S. forces in Afghanistan. That was bad enough. But Fritz Vogel owns his own business, a small welding firm.
NEWS
March 11, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN and ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weary and sunburned but proud, 400 American soldiers who fought tenacious battles with Al Qaeda and Taliban troops in eastern Afghanistan returned here Sunday, some of them telling bitter stories of being let down by an Afghan commander. The troops represent about a third of the U.S. force sent to battle Taliban and Al Qaeda holdouts in the mountainous Shahi Kot region in a campaign dubbed Operation Anaconda.
NEWS
March 11, 2002 | From Associated Press
Homeland Security chief Thomas J. Ridge said Sunday he is preparing a five-stage, multicolored alert system that will allow federal authorities to more precisely warn the public about domestic terrorism dangers. The system is a response to criticism that the four broad terror alerts issued by the government since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 have alarmed the public while providing little or no useful information.
NEWS
March 11, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S officials on Sunday defended the Pentagon's contingency plans for expanded use of nuclear weapons, saying the intent is to deter other nations from using biological or chemical weapons against Americans. The Bush administration wants to "send a very strong signal to anyone who might try to use weapons of mass destruction against the United States," National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice said on NBC's "Meet the Press."
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | JOSH MEYER and ERIC LICHTBLAU and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six months after the Sept. 11 skyjackings, the Justice Department is planning to send specially trained federal counterterrorism prosecutors to Europe to help press charges against the dozens of suspects taken into custody in recent months. Officials said they hope to reinvigorate law enforcement and intelligence gathering efforts that have achieved major success on some fronts--most notably by preventing numerous attacks against U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 2002
One new name, Thomas McCann, was added in recent days to the list of confirmed dead in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This updates accounts of the confirmed dead that have appeared in The Times each Sunday since Sept. 11. The number of people unaccounted for, according to New York City officials, is now believed to be 158.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tearful President Bush, speaking to a crowd that included the families of two soldiers killed in Afghanistan this week, vowed Friday that the United States would remain "relentless and determined" in fighting terrorists. "So long as I'm president, we're going to be after them, without blinking," he said, while cautioning that more American troops might die in the effort. Bush came to St.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The six soldiers stood at attention in the old Soviet airplane hangar Friday to receive Purple Hearts, the medal reserved for Americans wounded or killed in combat. One was a helicopter pilot grazed in the head by shrapnel when a rocket-propelled grenade shattered the cockpit of his aircraft. Others were infantrymen caught in a terrifying 18-hour mortar assault on the first day of Operation Anaconda in eastern Afghanistan.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They did not get all they wanted, but after two months of politicking and pleading with a federal special master, the families of the Sept. 11 dead will get more money from a federal Victims' Compensation Fund than originally proposed. Kenneth Feinberg, the fund's special master, announced Thursday the final rules that will govern how much relatives will receive to compensate for economic loss and pain and suffering caused by the multiple terrorist attacks on Sept.
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