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Terrorism United States

NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the focus on Afghanistan, the U.S.-led war on terrorism has quietly picked up pace worldwide, with increasing results even in problem areas ranging from Sudan in Africa and Yemen on the Arabian Peninsula to the Philippines in Southeast Asia, according to U.S. officials. The United States has tangible evidence that terrorist attacks outside Afghanistan have been disrupted, delayed or prevented by the four-month global effort, the officials say. Often with U.S.
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NEWS
January 6, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Few presidents have faced such a radical shift in circumstances so soon after taking office as George W. Bush. Elected while the nation was still luxuriating in peace and prosperity, Bush has been forced to grapple with recession and a devastating foreign attack on the American mainland. As a candidate, Bush focused on domestic issues--cutting taxes, reforming education, bolstering religious charities.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | KIM MURPHY and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It didn't matter what it was, his buddies said, Nate Chapman wanted to be there. Lending a hand. Doing the hard stuff. "There's a couple times where he'd be halfway dressed, running down the hallway, trying to catch up. You know, he never wanted to be left behind, he always wanted to be right there, willing to help and give a hand," Sgt. 1st Class William Pence said Saturday, fighting back tears as he recalled his Army comrade of 14 years, Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Ross Chapman, the first U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 2002 | PAUL RICHTER and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. Army Special Forces soldier was killed Friday in a firefight in eastern Afghanistan, becoming the first U.S. service member slain by enemy action in three months of warfare, Pentagon officials said. The Green Beret was identified as Sgt. 1st Class Nathan R. Chapman, 31, of San Antonio, Texas, the Pentagon said. He was ambushed while on a mission with allied Afghan fighters near Khowst, where Al Qaeda fighters have congregated, officials said.
NEWS
January 3, 2002 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The abrupt shutdown of Internet Web sites run by the U.S. Department of the Interior four weeks ago has left Americans in the dark about activities on millions of acres of federal lands, national parks and monuments.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a high-tech strategy against terrorists, the government will soon begin comparing foreign travelers with digitized photographs and will consider plans to encode their travel documents with personal data that can be read electronically. Starting this month, the State Department will relay digital images of foreign travelers to U.S. ports of entry.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the hunt for Osama bin Laden and Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar continued Tuesday, American defense officials confirmed that U.S. Marines were helping with "information gathering" at a former Taliban stronghold in southern Afghanistan. The Marines have been "actively doing a search . . . in the Helmand province west of Kandahar," while Special Forces have been working with anti-Taliban soldiers in the region, said Army Col. Rick Thomas at the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as a midnight Mass filled the hangar bay of this enormous aircraft carrier Monday with hymns praising God and prayers calling for peace for all mankind, the deadly business of war was never far away. A space had been cleared for the ecumenical service attended by hundreds of sailors and Marines, including Rear Adm. Jim Zortman, commander of the Stennis battle group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2001 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the vineyards of the San Joaquin Valley to the vegetable fields of Ventura, farmers say they are feeling the pinch from a post-Sept. 11 slowdown in the travel, hospitality and leisure industries. Reduced commercial demand has triggered oversupply and lower revenues for a variety of growers, especially those who sell to airlines, amusement parks, restaurants and hotels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheila Marie Ornedo, heavy with child, is due to give birth in February. The Los Angeles nurse is alone this Christmas, preparing for her baby girl's arrival without Ruben, her husband, by her side. Ruben is the one who should be massaging her aching back, as he used to; picking her up from work at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and taking her out to dinner, as he used to. He should be helping to fix up the nursery, as he was going to.
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