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Terrorism United States

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Predicted logjams failed to materialize at airports in Southern California and across the nation Friday as air traffic moved smoothly despite the imposition of new baggage screening procedures. Lines at many airports were long, but in spite of the start of a three-day holiday weekend, delays usually were no greater than they have been since the September terrorist attacks. Most passengers had anticipated delays and few missed their scheduled flights.
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NEWS
January 18, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Closer inspection for bombs hidden in baggage--the first step in building a new aviation security system--begins across the nation today, but the next big deadline facing the government is even more daunting. By the end of the year, 429 airports with regularly scheduled airline service must install machines to detect explosives that would make baggage screening much more secure than the temporary measures announced this week.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a federal fund to compensate relatives of the Sept. 11 dead was announced shortly before Christmas, the average award size--$1.6 million--seemed generous enough to take care of the people left behind. But now that they've read the fine print and done the math, many families--and the lawyers, financial advisors and politicians who serve them--are considerably less satisfied.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics of the nation's often-embattled immigration system were quick to condemn it after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The White House swiftly shelved controversial proposals for an amnesty for illegal immigrants from Mexico. And federal authorities made it easier to detain multitudes of noncitizens.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cells are boxes of chain-link fence with concrete floors and thick-planked wood roofs. The beds are mats on the floor. The jailers are gun-toting infantrymen, military police with attack-trained German shepherds and artillerymen in Humvees. And the inmates are "the worst of the worst," said the prison's commander--the toughest of the Al Qaeda and Taliban members currently held by the U.S. military in Afghanistan.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the hunt for Al Qaeda leaders expands beyond Afghanistan, authorities confirmed Tuesday that they are pursuing one man as intensely as Osama bin Laden himself--an elusive Palestinian who they believe has been entrusted with keeping the terrorist organization's global network of cells alive and operational.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2002 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Middle Eastern pilot being held in Arizona for alleged identity fraud violations that came to light in the probe of the Sept. 11 terrorism attacks has been indicted in Los Angeles on two additional charges. Malek Mohamed Seif, also known as Malek Mohamed Abdallah, was indicted Thursday by a Los Angeles federal grand jury for allegedly lying to the Immigration and Naturalization Service about his background to obtain political asylum in 1998, a spokesman for the Phoenix U.S.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the focus on Afghanistan, the U.S.-led war on terrorism has quietly picked up pace worldwide, with increasing results even in problem areas ranging from Sudan in Africa and Yemen on the Arabian Peninsula to the Philippines in Southeast Asia, according to U.S. officials. The United States has tangible evidence that terrorist attacks outside Afghanistan have been disrupted, delayed or prevented by the four-month global effort, the officials say. Often with U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Few presidents have faced such a radical shift in circumstances so soon after taking office as George W. Bush. Elected while the nation was still luxuriating in peace and prosperity, Bush has been forced to grapple with recession and a devastating foreign attack on the American mainland. As a candidate, Bush focused on domestic issues--cutting taxes, reforming education, bolstering religious charities.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | KIM MURPHY and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It didn't matter what it was, his buddies said, Nate Chapman wanted to be there. Lending a hand. Doing the hard stuff. "There's a couple times where he'd be halfway dressed, running down the hallway, trying to catch up. You know, he never wanted to be left behind, he always wanted to be right there, willing to help and give a hand," Sgt. 1st Class William Pence said Saturday, fighting back tears as he recalled his Army comrade of 14 years, Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Ross Chapman, the first U.S.
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