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Terrorists Afghanistan

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NEWS
July 18, 1999 | Associated Press
The State Department says it has received a growing body of information strongly suggesting that extremists based in Afghanistan are preparing to attack U.S. interests in Pakistan in the near future. In a travel warning, the department noted Friday that reputed international terrorist Osama bin Laden lives in Afghanistan and has supporters in Pakistan. Bin Laden is wanted for bombings of American embassies last August in Kenya and Tanzania.
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WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
As Romanian military and civilian officials mingled at a VIP reception aboard a yacht that belonged to executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, a U.S. Navy band played an American selection: the Gershwins, Cole Porter and Broadway show tunes. The occasion was Romanian Navy Day, but the message being delivered at this Black Sea port was broader than pride in the country's sailors: America, we are with you. If the musical choices weren't enough, the blunt-talking defense minister, Gabriel Oprea, made it crystal clear in his Navy Day speech, solemnly listing the names of "the heroes" who have been killed in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
November 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Six rockets were launched in a coordinated attack on U.S. and United Nations offices here Friday, and hours later Pakistan's military leader offered to mediate between the United States and Afghanistan's Taliban rulers over suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden. The rockets were fired from cars near the U.S. Embassy, the U.N. building, an American cultural center and downtown government buildings in Pakistan's capital, injuring six people. There was no immediate evidence that Bin Laden, who U.S.
WORLD
January 4, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. military said Friday that it had a right to chase suspected terrorists operating in unsettled southeastern Afghan border areas as they flee into Pakistani territory, a position that a senior Pakistani official later rejected. The dispute comes after a still murky border clash Sunday in which a Pakistani border scout fired on a U.S. military patrol near Shkin in Afghanistan, wounding one soldier. U.S. forces then called in an airstrike, killing two Pakistanis.
WORLD
January 4, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. military said Friday that it had a right to chase suspected terrorists operating in unsettled southeastern Afghan border areas as they flee into Pakistani territory, a position that a senior Pakistani official later rejected. The dispute comes after a still murky border clash Sunday in which a Pakistani border scout fired on a U.S. military patrol near Shkin in Afghanistan, wounding one soldier. U.S. forces then called in an airstrike, killing two Pakistanis.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is considering various forms of cooperation with the United States in a possible military assault on terrorists based in Afghanistan and is conferring with its Central Asian allies, U.S. and Russian officials said Monday. "They have not ruled anything in or anything out," Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton said after meeting with top Russian officials here. Russia's cooperation could be critical to any U.S. military action in Afghanistan.
WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
As Romanian military and civilian officials mingled at a VIP reception aboard a yacht that belonged to executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, a U.S. Navy band played an American selection: the Gershwins, Cole Porter and Broadway show tunes. The occasion was Romanian Navy Day, but the message being delivered at this Black Sea port was broader than pride in the country's sailors: America, we are with you. If the musical choices weren't enough, the blunt-talking defense minister, Gabriel Oprea, made it crystal clear in his Navy Day speech, solemnly listing the names of "the heroes" who have been killed in Afghanistan.
NEWS
October 16, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudi Arabia's interior minister, Prince Naif, criticized the Afghanistan bombing, saying the kingdom opposes terrorism but disapproves of the U.S. response. "We wish the United States had been able to flush out the terrorists in Afghanistan without resorting to the current action . . . because this is killing innocent people," the official Saudi Press Agency quoted him as saying. "We are not at all happy with the situation. This in no way means we are not willing to confront terrorism."
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Islam Karimov said on state television that his government will open its airspace to U.S. and allied aircraft. Uzbekistan is on Afghanistan's northern border. Karimov said his government will "make its own contribution to the liquidation of camps and bases of terrorists in Afghanistan and is ready to make its airspace available for this purpose."
WORLD
February 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Milan court convicted five North African men of having ties to Al Qaeda and sentenced them to four to eight years each in prison. The men were found guilty of links to a cell that sent would-be terrorists to Afghanistan, Tunisia and Algeria, the Italian news agency ANSA reported. However, they were cleared of charges of aiding and abetting illegal immigration. The longest sentence went to Abdelkader Mahmoud Es Sayed, an Egyptian who was tried in absentia.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is considering various forms of cooperation with the United States in a possible military assault on terrorists based in Afghanistan and is conferring with its Central Asian allies, U.S. and Russian officials said Monday. "They have not ruled anything in or anything out," Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton said after meeting with top Russian officials here. Russia's cooperation could be critical to any U.S. military action in Afghanistan.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Six rockets were launched in a coordinated attack on U.S. and United Nations offices here Friday, and hours later Pakistan's military leader offered to mediate between the United States and Afghanistan's Taliban rulers over suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden. The rockets were fired from cars near the U.S. Embassy, the U.N. building, an American cultural center and downtown government buildings in Pakistan's capital, injuring six people. There was no immediate evidence that Bin Laden, who U.S.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | A Times staff writer
The State Department said Tuesday that it has obtained information indicating that extremists based in Afghanistan, presumably allied with terrorist Osama bin Laden, are preparing to attack U.S. citizens and property in Pakistan. The department urged Americans to avoid travel to Pakistan, especially the tribal areas of the country's North-West Frontier province. It said U.S.
OPINION
January 7, 2002
We were recently advised that on Jan. 1 a new pricing schedule would take effect covering our retiree health benefits. As of that date the co-pay for a brand-name drug increases from $30 to $48 and for a generic drug from $10 to $24. Inasmuch as our prescriptions are about evenly split, and if my math is correct, this appears to be about an 80% increase. After we get through with the terrorists in Afghanistan, perhaps we should go after the terrorists in the prescription drug industry.
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