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Terry A Anderson

NEWS
March 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
American journalist Terry A. Anderson, longest-held of the 16 Western hostages in Lebanon, begins his fifth year of captivity today, and on Wednesday his sister and a former hostage in Lebanon called for renewed attention to the plight of the remaining hostages and urged reconciliation with Iran.
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NEWS
December 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Lebanese newspapers published Christmas letters Saturday to American hostages Terry A. Anderson and Thomas Sutherland and to British captive John McCarthy from their families and friends. The U.S.-based Journalists' Committee to Free Terry Anderson urged the pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad (Islamic Holy War) to free the journalist and Sutherland "in the name of humanity."
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Americans Terry A. Anderson and Thomas M. Sutherland spent their sixth Christmas in captivity Tuesday, and newspapers printed greetings from Anderson's family and a photo of the daughter he has never held. "Perhaps our miracle will happen and we'll welcome you home in time to share the beginning of the new year," wrote Peggy Say, Anderson's sister. For Anderson, the longest-held Western hostage in Lebanon, it was another macabre milestone in his ordeal.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
Terry A. Anderson was released Wednesday after more than six years and nine months in captivity, Iran's official news agency said, ending an agonizing and frustrating seven-year hostage ordeal for the United States. Earlier, Alann Steen, 52, who had been kidnaped in January, 1987, was freed. Anderson, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, was held in Lebanon by Shiite Muslim extremists longer than any other Westerner.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the hubbub of telex, telephones and news deadlines, the Associated Press office once assigned to Terry A. Anderson, the agency's Beirut bureau chief, is a quiet, almost shrine-like room. The metal desk, its drawers locked, and the leather-upholstered swivel chair reveal little about the man whose name is linked with the term "the longest-held Western hostage." Anderson left the office March 16, 1985, five years ago Friday, to play tennis just a couple of blocks away.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
Former hostage Terry A. Anderson returned to one of his hometowns Saturday to thank those who gave him hope during nearly seven years of captivity in Lebanon. Anderson came to Lorain for a weekend visit, including a private family reunion. He will be grand marshal of the Lorain International Festival parade today. "It's a little disconcerting being a celebrity," said Anderson, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press. "People recognize me on the street.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Lebanese terrorist group released a picture of captive American Terry A. Anderson on Thursday and threatened the United States and Germany with "drastic consequences" unless two Lebanese held in German prisons are released. The Shiite Muslim group calling itself Islamic Jihad sent a 1 1/2-page Arabic statement and a photo of Anderson to the Reuters news agency bureau in West Beirut. Anderson, one of six Americans believed held hostage in Lebanon, looked gaunt and grim.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Authorities arrested a Lebanese woman who was carrying pictures of three Americans held hostage in Lebanon and a letter from one of them in a false bottom in her suitcase, police said Saturday. The woman, a Maronite Christian identified as Aline Ibrahim Rizkalah, 36, was detained Thursday at Milan's Linate Airport after arriving on a Middle East Airlines flight from Beirut, said Fortunato Finoli, deputy director of the Milan police anti-terrorist unit. She was carrying photos of Terry A.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Terry A. Anderson came home Tuesday to his first Christmas of freedom after more than 6 1/2 years in captivity and to the cheers of his colleagues at the Associated Press. "I am not a hero. I am just somebody who got caught," said the 44-year-old chief Middle East correspondent of the AP, who wore a T-shirt proclaiming, "Hello, World."
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a city of 1.4 million people and a reputation for chaos, is it possible that a letter with only a name and "Beirut" for an address can be delivered? The answer is yes, if that name is Terry Anderson. Now 43, Anderson was kidnaped March 16, 1985 in Beirut. He was, at the time, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press. Today, Anderson begins his seventh year as a captive and as the longest held of the 11 Western hostages in Lebanon, including five other Americans.
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