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Terry Atkinson

ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1985
John Fogerty's new record is real nice, just exactly like most of his old records, which were real nice; a classic, ridiculously simple guitar solo composed of licks that had been established before John was born, some down-home lyrics and a nice beat. So why is your Mr. Robert Hilburn running around in circles and waving his yahoo flag over what he terms a "captivating display of pure rock vision" ("Fogerty's Nightmare Is Over," Jan. 6)? Why does everything Hilburn likes have to be the greatest thing since sliced bread, and everything he's not crazy about be a blot against mankind?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON and CHRIS WILLMAN
In 1986 the vaunted power of music videos seemed to slip a bit. Seemed is the key word, because the final vote isn't in. The chief evidence against the form--a slip in MTV ratings, the fact that Van Halen and Journey didn't make videos for a couple of singles--may prove merely circumstantial. And for every Van Halen record that wasn't promoted by a video, there were 10 Cinderellas boosted by visual aids.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1985
I have always felt that Rocket J. Squirrel and Bullwinkle the Moose were trying to be funny. The current weekend reruns are reinforcing that original feeling, and I am grateful for the opportunity provided by Channel 7. But the John Fogerty "Centerfield" "rerun" does nothing for the memory of Creedence Clearwater Revival Days. Maybe Fogerty is trying to be funny?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1985
OK, let me get this straight ("Rick Dees Sounds Off!," by Dennis McDougal, Feb. 3): Rick Dees has an unprecedented radio success, expensive toys, a happy family. He makes people laugh, even at themselves. He's riding high and making the best of it, and he hates getting ripped off. So for this I'm supposed to hate the guy? Just checking. P.S. Hey, Rick--Don't sweat it. SUSAN BLACK Los Angeles McDougal overlooked an interesting point that should be obvious to anyone who reads the radio trade papers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
CD OR NOT CD? Compact discs are the biggest thing to hit the audio world since stereo. At least that's what millions of Americans think. They're turning away from traditional vinyl records in favor of these small plastic-and-aluminum discs that hold up to 74 minutes of music ... and deliver it--proponents say--with incredible clarity. The technology involves a laser beam in the CD player that translates digitally encoded "pits" on the disc.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1985
In contrast to last year, when Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the U.S.A." and Prince's "Purple Rain" ran away from the field, the 1985 album poll of 18 Times pop-music contributors yielded a tighter and more diversified race. (See below; albums are awarded 10 points for a first-place vote, 9 points for second, etc.).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1985
Madonna is not a bimbo ("What's Wrong With Bimbo Rock?," by Connie Johnson, March 10). Any moron (even Pia Zadora, for that matter) could tell you that Madonna's entire "boy-toy" image is just a put-on. The fact that Johnson takes this image so seriously and interprets it as a step backward for the feminist movement leads me to believe that she worries too much. I suggest that she stop trying to analyze everything that she sees and just relax and enjoy the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT
Julian Lennon closed his eyes and went straight to heaven. The young singer-songwriter's blissful smile indicated that a vision of paradise was being screened in his mind's eye. It turned out that his heaven wasn't exotic or luxurious. He was just dreaming about enjoying a few weeks off, with no recording studios, no concert halls, no record executives, no nosy interviewers--just leisure. "Sheer, pure heaven," gushed Lennon, the 23-year-old son of John, the late Beatle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON
CD OR NOT CD? Compact discs are the biggest thing to hit the audio world since stereo. At least that's what millions of Americans think. They're turning away from traditional vinyl records in favor of these small plastic-and-aluminum discs that hold up to 74 minutes of music ... and deliver it--proponents say--with incredible clarity. The technology involves a laser beam in the CD player that translates digitally encoded "pits" on the disc.
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