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January 1, 1986 | Associated Press
Republican Gov. Terry Branstad's new press secretary is a longtime registered Democrat who supported Colorado Sen. Gary Hart for President. Dick Vohs' political affiliation should not prevent him from serving as spokesman for the first-term governor, Branstad aides said Tuesday. Vohs, 35, said his affiliation "didn't really seem to bother the governor, and it didn't seem to bother me. I've been more of a person person than a party man."
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2013 | By Shan Li
Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad is sweeping through California in a bid to lure businesses away -- a mere week after his counterpart in Texas similarly tried to bag some Golden State companies. Branstad and Texas Gov. Rick Perry had similar courtship strategies: Convince companies how terrible California is for businesses. "A happy hunting ground," is what Branstad called California during an interview on KCRA 3 in Sacramento. "The state's in a financial mess," Branstad said. "Taxes are going up. There's a lot of uncertainty.
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NEWS
March 12, 1986
The Iowa House voted to ask Gov. Terry Branstad to cancel a National Guard deployment to Honduras aimed at providing medical support for a road-building unit. Critics said the plan sounded a lot like the beginnings of the Vietnam War, when a small number of Americans went to that country. "I saw what that did to my generation," said Rep. Jack Holveck. "I vowed I would never again stay silent when our country is faced with that kind of issue."
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been updated. See below for details. >
BOSTON - The race for 2016 has officially begun. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) will headline a birthday fundraiser for Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad next week, a benchmark gathering that is expected to attract hundreds of Republicans in the state that will kick off the next presidential nomination contest. Anytime any politician appears in states like Iowa or New Hampshire, they cause shock waves because of these states' early voting roles in selecting party nominees. PHOTOS: Reactions to Obama's victory “Every single move any national politician makes here is looked at through the caucus lens,” said Tim Albrecht, a spokesman for Branstad.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been updated. See below for details. >
BOSTON - The race for 2016 has officially begun. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) will headline a birthday fundraiser for Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad next week, a benchmark gathering that is expected to attract hundreds of Republicans in the state that will kick off the next presidential nomination contest. Anytime any politician appears in states like Iowa or New Hampshire, they cause shock waves because of these states' early voting roles in selecting party nominees. PHOTOS: Reactions to Obama's victory “Every single move any national politician makes here is looked at through the caucus lens,” said Tim Albrecht, a spokesman for Branstad.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Calling Mike Huckabee's decision not to run for president a "momentous" development, Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad predicted one of the most wide-open races in the history of the state's leadoff presidential caucuses, and urged candidates to step up their game soon. Roughly three months before an early test of support, the Ames Straw Poll, the Republican governor said Monday that it's "not too late" for candidates to visit, predicting a "deluge" of activity in the near future. "With hard work and retail politics, going to all 99 counties, meeting with people and answering their questions, this is a state where you can effectively launch a campaign," he told reporters.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Paul West
Mitt Romney may not look like a giant after an Iowa caucus win likely to go down as the tiniest victory in the annals of modern politics. But the former Massachusetts governor is poised to make history. His expected victory in next Tuesday's New Hampshire primary would make him the first Republican other than an incumbent president to win Iowa and New Hampshire back-to-back. That would be a huge achievement, propelling him forcefully into the rest of the primary season and quite possibly ending the Republican race well before the first big round of elections on Super Tuesday in early March.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Lisa Howard switched her voter registration from Republican to Democratic in 2008 so she could caucus for Barack Obama, so impressed was she by the fresh-faced candidate's calls for hope and change. While the 50-year-old supports Obama's efforts to fix the economy — the top issue here and everywhere else — she doesn't know if she'll be supporting him again in the 2012 presidential contest. The real estate agent plans to survey the GOP field, though to be honest she has been too busy staying afloat to get involved.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Much of the Republican presidential field gathered here Tuesday to discuss how to improve the nation's economy. But what was most notable was who skipped the event — Iowa front-runners Mitt Romney and Herman Cain. The two men have staked their candidacies on their business resumes, arguing that their tenures as corporate chiefs make them perfectly suited to lead a nation in economic distress. So the forum by the National Assn. of Manufacturers — co-moderated by the state's Republican governor — would seem like an ideal audience.
NEWS
June 1, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
A group of leading Iowa Republicans left New Jersey on Tuesday without a firm commitment from Gov. Chris Christie to reconsider a presidential run. But speculation about the tough-talking Republican promises to live on with his pledge to help shape the debate in the leadoff caucus state with a July visit focused on education. Seven influential GOP leaders made the unusual pilgrimage from Iowa to Drumthwacket, the official residence of New Jersey's governor, hoping to draft Christie into the race.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Paul West
Mitt Romney may not look like a giant after an Iowa caucus win likely to go down as the tiniest victory in the annals of modern politics. But the former Massachusetts governor is poised to make history. His expected victory in next Tuesday's New Hampshire primary would make him the first Republican other than an incumbent president to win Iowa and New Hampshire back-to-back. That would be a huge achievement, propelling him forcefully into the rest of the primary season and quite possibly ending the Republican race well before the first big round of elections on Super Tuesday in early March.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Paul West, Mark Z. Barabak and Seema Mehta
In the final debate before voting starts in the 2012 presidential contest, front-running Newt Gingrich battled renewed criticism Thursday night from rivals over his activities outside of government, including taking $1.6 million from mortgage giant Freddie Mac. Rep. Michele Bachmann argued that even if Gingrich was not technically a lobbyist, the paychecks he received were clear evidence that he was influence peddling. Gingrich, under sustained fire as the pre-primary season nears an end, responded by accusing Bachmann of making "wild allegations.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Much of the Republican presidential field gathered here Tuesday to discuss how to improve the nation's economy. But what was most notable was who skipped the event — Iowa front-runners Mitt Romney and Herman Cain. The two men have staked their candidacies on their business resumes, arguing that their tenures as corporate chiefs make them perfectly suited to lead a nation in economic distress. So the forum by the National Assn. of Manufacturers — co-moderated by the state's Republican governor — would seem like an ideal audience.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Lisa Howard switched her voter registration from Republican to Democratic in 2008 so she could caucus for Barack Obama, so impressed was she by the fresh-faced candidate's calls for hope and change. While the 50-year-old supports Obama's efforts to fix the economy — the top issue here and everywhere else — she doesn't know if she'll be supporting him again in the 2012 presidential contest. The real estate agent plans to survey the GOP field, though to be honest she has been too busy staying afloat to get involved.
NEWS
June 1, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
A group of leading Iowa Republicans left New Jersey on Tuesday without a firm commitment from Gov. Chris Christie to reconsider a presidential run. But speculation about the tough-talking Republican promises to live on with his pledge to help shape the debate in the leadoff caucus state with a July visit focused on education. Seven influential GOP leaders made the unusual pilgrimage from Iowa to Drumthwacket, the official residence of New Jersey's governor, hoping to draft Christie into the race.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Mike Huckabee’s sudden and surprising announcement over the weekend that he would not seek the presidency in 2012 has opened up the race and given new life to some potential contenders. So who does Huckabee’s exit help — and who does it hurt? “I know I’m going to deeply disappoint a lot of people I love. It pains me to let them down,’’ Huckabee said on his eponymous Fox News show Saturday evening. “But I know my decision is going to delight just as many who aren’t that fond of me.’’ The former Arkansas governor had consistently been doing well in polls, typically running neck-and-neck with Mitt Romney.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Mike Huckabee’s sudden and surprising announcement over the weekend that he would not seek the presidency in 2012 has opened up the race and given new life to some potential contenders. So who does Huckabee’s exit help — and who does it hurt? “I know I’m going to deeply disappoint a lot of people I love. It pains me to let them down,’’ Huckabee said on his eponymous Fox News show Saturday evening. “But I know my decision is going to delight just as many who aren’t that fond of me.’’ The former Arkansas governor had consistently been doing well in polls, typically running neck-and-neck with Mitt Romney.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Paul West, Mark Z. Barabak and Seema Mehta
In the final debate before voting starts in the 2012 presidential contest, front-running Newt Gingrich battled renewed criticism Thursday night from rivals over his activities outside of government, including taking $1.6 million from mortgage giant Freddie Mac. Rep. Michele Bachmann argued that even if Gingrich was not technically a lobbyist, the paychecks he received were clear evidence that he was influence peddling. Gingrich, under sustained fire as the pre-primary season nears an end, responded by accusing Bachmann of making "wild allegations.
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Calling Mike Huckabee's decision not to run for president a "momentous" development, Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad predicted one of the most wide-open races in the history of the state's leadoff presidential caucuses, and urged candidates to step up their game soon. Roughly three months before an early test of support, the Ames Straw Poll, the Republican governor said Monday that it's "not too late" for candidates to visit, predicting a "deluge" of activity in the near future. "With hard work and retail politics, going to all 99 counties, meeting with people and answering their questions, this is a state where you can effectively launch a campaign," he told reporters.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2009 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Jerry Brown has fashioned a career alone on the cutting edge of politics, but as he looks ahead to 2010, the California attorney general finds himself in the midst of an unusual pack: former governors eyeing a return to their old jobs. At least four, and perhaps as many as six, ex-governors may be on the ballot around the country next year, a pattern apparently without precedent or any clear-cut explanation, beyond the fact that few jobs in American politics beat the chance to run your own state, even in these difficult times.
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