Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTest Flight
IN THE NEWS

Test Flight

NEWS
December 31, 1986 | Associated Press
The Lavi, Israel's new jet fighter, zoomed into the sky today on its first test flight and landed 30 minutes later, Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin announced. The maiden flight was deemed a success. Only Israeli military correspondents were allowed to watch the flight, which had been scheduled for September but was delayed by technical difficulties. The Lavi, meaning Lion in Hebrew, is reported to have the most advanced electronic gear in the world. The Mach 1.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | United Press International
A bizarre-looking plane designed to fly around the world without refueling was forced to land Wednesday, only hours after beginning what was supposed to be a marathon test flight, crew officials said. The Voyager--a futuristic aircraft that looks like a toy glider magnified hundreds of times --safely landed at Vandenberg Air Force Base on the coast after trouble developed, an Air Force spokesman said. "We had an equipment failure on the rear propeller.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | Associated Press
An unarmed Trident 2 submarine missile misfired Monday and was deliberately destroyed by a radio signal from the ground about a minute after it lifted off on a test flight from a land launch pad. The failure was the third in 15 test firings for the missile being groomed as the most powerful in the Navy's nuclear arsenal. The Navy reported about 20 minutes after the 1:45 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $1.5-million experimental pilotless plane, one of only two of its kind, started to break apart during a test flight 33,000 feet over the Antelope Valley on Tuesday afternoon and dropped to the ground by parachute--perhaps damaged beyond repair, a NASA spokesman said.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
A malfunction in the fuel system of the B-2 stealth bomber forced Air Force officials to postpone the first test flight of the $530-million Northrop plane just as the aircraft was taxiing into takeoff position Saturday morning. Air Force officials left unclear whether the problem was serious, but the aircraft was sent back to the hangar "in accordance with normal safety procedures," according to a statement read by Col. Douglas Kennett, a spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1998 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the roar of F-16 engines providing the perfect accompaniment, the Madison Middle School students stuck their heads into the cockpit of a fighter jet Wednesday as part of a hands-on educational experience at the famed Air Force Flight Test Center in the Mojave Desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1995 | JEANNETTE DeSANTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An advanced experimental fighter jet, one of only two in existence, crashed in the Mojave desert and was destroyed Thursday, but the pilot ejected and was apparently unharmed, NASA reported. The plane was an X-31, under development jointly by the United States and Germany. Karl Lang, a German government pilot who is one of only six X-31 test pilots, was returning from a research flight when the accident occurred, said Air Force Maj. Janet Reese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1991 | LISA CASTIGLIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Encinitas man described as a highly qualified pilot by fellow fliers was killed Friday when he bailed out of his homemade airplane after the engine began sputtering during a test flight above Brown Field. James A. Speyer, 41, was approaching the Otay Mesa landing strip at 10:25 a.m. at an altitude of 150 feet when the plane's engine apparently failed and the left wing fell off, said Bill Leard, an investigator with the San Diego County medical examiner's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1995 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An X-31 experimental jet spun out of control and crashed in the desert north of Edwards Air Force Base on a test flight earlier this year because ice had built up on an unheated air speed measuring device, an investigatory committee has concluded. The pilot, who parachuted, survived with serious injuries. An ad hoc committee of U.S. and German military officials, in findings released Tuesday, said that the ice caused the device to give incorrect data to the computers that help fly the plane.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Raytheon Co., the Waltham, Mass., aerospace giant, announced that two of its four business units will have new headquarters locations. Raytheon's space and airborne systems unit headquarters will move from El Segundo to McKinney, Texas, where the company already has a major presence. El Segundo City Manager Greg Carpenter said the move would result in the loss of 170 jobs. Raytheon would not comment on the job loss numbers. “We hate to lose any jobs in El Segundo,” he said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|