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August 31, 2011
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ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A story line has developed during Mayor Eric Garcetti's first nine months on the job, and it goes something like this: In stark contrast to his predecessor, Antonio Villaraigosa, who often held multiple news conferences a day and launched big initiatives, Garcetti has taken such a low-profile, behind-the-scenes approach that people wonder what he'll have to show for his first year in office. Though Garcetti hasn't avoided the limelight - he was on stage last week with former President Clinton, for instance - he often goes days without a public event, and he hasn't yet proposed a major program or policy change.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2012 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The tech broke the bud of marijuana into small flakes, measuring 200 milligrams into a vial. He had picked up the strain, Ghost, earlier that day from a dispensary in the Valley and guessed by its pungency and visible resin glands that it was potent. He could have determined this the old-fashioned way, with a bong and a match. Instead, he began the meticulous process of preparing the sample for the high-pressure liquid chromatograph. His lab, called The Werc Shop, tests medical cannabis for levels of the psychoactive ingredient known as THC and a few dozen other compounds, as well as for contaminants like molds, bacteria and pesticides that marijuana advocates don't much like to talk about.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | Alan Zarembo
In a windowless cinder-block room at Ft. Hood on Wednesday morning, 11 soldiers closed their eyes and practiced taking deep, slow breaths. The technique is useful for gaining self-control in stressful situations, explained their instructor. In the course of the day, the students would practice escaping a wrestling hold while being taunted by fellow soldiers. They would balance a dime on the end of an M16 rifle. They would watch a clip from the movie "Talladega Nights" in which Will Ferrell tries to get into a car with a cougar in the front seat.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
testing testing testing
NEWS
March 27, 2012
this is test only
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | Help Desk Jess
testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing testing  
OPINION
May 2, 2012 | By H. Gilbert Welch
In case you missed it, a recommendation came out last month that physicians cut back on using 45 common tests and treatments. In addition, patients were advised to question doctors who recommend such things as antibiotics for mild sinusitis, CT scans for an uncomplicated headache or a repeat colonoscopy within 10 years of a normal exam. The general idea wasn't all that new - my colleagues and I have been questioning many of the same tests and treatments for years. What was different this time was the source of the recommendations.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
BAQ-3747 Document timestamp logic and display rules on .story and .column Edit Assign Comment More Actions Stop Progress Start QAT Workflow View Details Type: Story Story Status: In Progress In Progress Resolution: Unresolved Fix Version/s: September 2, 2011 Component/s: Front-end Support Rank: 1775 Labels: Description: What are the business rules around how we display timestamps ¿ Relative vs absolute thresholds colors sizes etc Activity All Comments Work...
BUSINESS
May 10, 2010 | Cyndia Zwahlen
Spring is here, and people around the Southland are flocking once again to newly bountiful farmers markets where hopeful vendors offer everything from peas to paintings. For shoppers eager for everything fresh, local and often pesticide-free, the idea seems simple enough. But for potential merchants, the job can be surprisingly challenging. Many markets are filled and not accepting newcomers. Others limit what kinds of products can be sold. And there can be paperwork to contend with.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
The stock market is hitting new highs - just as corporate profit growth is slowing to a crawl. Rising earnings helped drive share prices to a series of record peaks in the last few years. But that dynamic could be tested this week when companies such as Alcoa Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. begin releasing first-quarter results. Quarterly profits are expected to drop for just the second time in four years. The decline would be relatively small: 1.2% for companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 index, according to FactSet Research Systems.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
A look at the NCAA tournament semifinal between the seventh-seeded Connecuticut Huskies (30-8) and the first-seeded and top-ranked Florida Gators (36-2). When: Today, 3:09 p.m. TV: TBS Breakdown: Florida is the only No. 1-seeded team to survive the two-week tournament gantlet and got to Texas by defeating four teams with a total seeding number of 40: Albany (16), Pittsburgh (9), UCLA (4) and Dayton (11). The Gators' last defeat was Dec. 2 against Connecticut. The Gators are led by four seniors: Scottie Wilbekin, Patric Young, Casey Prather and Will Yeguete.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By David Lauter and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Affordable Care Act has passed its first big test, but the law's distribution of winners and losers all but guarantees the achievement will not quiet its political opposition. White House officials, who had a near-death experience with the law's rollout six months ago, were nearly giddy Tuesday as they celebrated an open-enrollment season that ended on a high note. Despite the early problems with the federal website, "7.1 million Americans have now signed up," President Obama declared in a Rose Garden speech to members of Congress, his staff and supporters in which he notably returned to referring to the law as "Obamacare.
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
SAN DIEGO - The game between the Dodgers and San Diego Padres on Sunday broke in Major League Baseball's expanded instant replay system. Well, kind of. Neither team challenged a call in the Padres' 3-1 victory. Manager Don Mattingly didn't sound particularly concerned with the implementation of the new technology, even though it wasn't available to the Dodgers until they hosted the Angels on Thursday in the opening game of the Freeway Series. The new system wasn't in effect for the Dodgers' season-opening, two-game series in Australia against the Arizona Diamondbacks.
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Steven Borowiec
SEOUL - - North Korea test-launched two medium-range ballistic missiles early Wednesday in violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions, officials said. The South Korean military said the missiles were launched just after 2:30 a.m. and flew for a little more than 400 miles. The U.S. State Department said the two missiles flew "over North Korea's land mass and impacted in the Sea of Japan. " It appeared that North Korea did not issue maritime warnings about the launches, the department said.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and E. Scott Reckard
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators rejected plans by Citigroup Inc. and four other large U.S. banks for dividend payments and stock buybacks after the latest round of stress tests. The results raised concerns about weaknesses in the risk-planning processes of Citi and three of the banks, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday. It was the second time in three years that Citi failed a federal stress test. Citi's chief executive, Michael Corbat, said he was "deeply disappointed" by the Fed's findings, asserting that the nation's third-largest bank by assets was "one of the best-capitalized financial institutions in the world.
NATIONAL
December 30, 2013 | By Richard Simon and W.J. Hennigan
WASHINGTON -- After a fierce nationwide competition that offers potentially big economic benefits for the winners, six sites were selected Monday for testing of how drones can be more widely used in U.S. airspace. The Federal Aviation Administration announced the selection of sites in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia. California, vying to become the Silicon Valley of robotic aircraft, was among the losers in the 24-state competition.  "These test sites will give us valuable information about how best to ensure the safe introduction of this advanced technology into our nation's skies,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2011 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Caltrans has fired two employees amid investigations into faulty — and in some instances falsified — structural testing on bridges and highway projects across the state, including a carpool lane connector and an under-crossing retaining wall in the Los Angeles area. During a news conference Monday, Caltrans officials identified the employees as Duane Wiles, a former technician who tested bridge and freeway structures, and Brian Liebich, who supervised Wiles as head of the agency's foundation testing unit.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Margie Beskau would seem to have a strong lawsuit against General Motors for millions in damages. Eight years ago, her 15-year-old daughter, Amy Rademaker, died in a Chevrolet Cobalt - one of the cars the automaker has now admitted had a deadly safety defect. A faulty ignition switch shut off the car, leaving its teenage driver without power steering, brakes or air bags. But Beskau probably will never collect in the civil courts, legal experts say, because GM has been absolved of all responsibility for crashes before the automaker's 2009 bankruptcy and federal bailout.
OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Dennis Ross
President Obama will visit Saudi Arabia this week. Based on what I hear from key Saudis, he is in for a rough reception. Rarely have the Saudis been more skeptical about the United States, and if the president is to affect Saudi behavior, it is important for him to understand why. Fundamentally, the Saudis believe that America's friends and interests are under threat, and the U.S. response has ranged from indifference to accommodation. The Saudis see Iran trying to encircle them with its Quds Force active in Bahrain, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and their own eastern province.
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