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BUSINESS
May 12, 1986
The company said the test, which will resume in mid-July, will run at least three months and will be in 12 markets to be identified later. In the first phase of market testing, Picture Week was distributed in 13 cities from September, 1985, until mid-February.
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NEWS
June 16, 1989
The Transportation Department is considering expanding its drug-testing program to include random checks for alcohol abuse among 4 million transportation workers, Secretary Samuel K. Skinner told Congress. Skinner also said that he would recommend that President Bush veto a House anti-drug bill, if passed, because the measure covering railroad workers would require the Administration to start over on a drug-testing program it has already ordered. Skinner made the announcement on alcohol testing before a Senate committee considering its version of legislation to require random testing throughout the transportation industries.
SPORTS
May 17, 1986
If anyone wonders why the athletes' unions resist random drug testing, get in touch with James FitzPatrick. The NFL sanctimoniously labels its testing program as confidential. The NFL's definition of confidential is that if an athlete tests positive, the headlines on Page 1 of the sports section are only normal sized, not extra large. Gene Upshaw, Donald Fehr and Larry Fleisher have earned my respect by standing tall for "probable cause" and not being stampeded by the hysteria of the moment.
SPORTS
August 10, 2002
As baseball management and players continue to reprise their roles of "Dumb and Dumber," it is the fans who are being played for the fools as the union allegedly agrees to steroid testing. The players' union did not agree this week to random testing for steroids. They agreed to test to see if there is a problem with steroids. The plan calls for testing in 2003 and if 5% of the tests come back positive, there will be a follow-up survey in 2004. That means no firm action until at least 2005.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal judge Friday refused to issue a temporary restraining order that would bar Trans World Airlines from testing employees for drug use and alcohol abuse. U.S. District Judge Louis Oberdorfer ruled that the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers failed to demonstrate a need for a temporary restraining order under the Railway Labor Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | Compiled from Staff and Wire Reports and
An AIDS vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, based on his work in preventing polio, may be ready for testing in humans in January, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, said Monday. "We don't offer any false hopes or promises," said Neil Flynn, who is chief of the AIDS unit at the University Medical Center in Sacramento. With this treatment, "in fact, the subject could get worse." The projected test of the vaccine on 40 patients requires prior approval by the U.S.
SPORTS
September 3, 1988
Nothing disturbed me more than reading Chuck Peri's viewpoint (Aug. 20) about the NCAA's right to drug test athletes. As a collegiate athlete, I agree with the Superior Court judge's ruling that drug testing violates an individual's right to privacy, which is protected by the Bill of Rights. Peri seems more concerned about the rights of the NCAA. He seems to be forgetting the simple issue at hand here. In my view, the human side. JOHN BRANDOLINO Los Angeles
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989
Cambrian Systems in Westlake Village acquired the assets of JCS Technology in Los Gatos for an undisclosed price. Both companies make equipment to test disk drives, the devices that store and retrieve data in computers. Cambrian sought the acquisition because it wants to be "a broad-line supplier" of various disk-drive testing products, said Bert Munnikhuis, Cambrian's vice president of marketing and sales. "They were a perfect match," he said. The acquisition will add about 10 people to Cambrian's work force of 120 employees, he added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2008 | Victoria Kim
A Northern California school district violated students' constitutional rights to privacy by requiring random drug testing for anyone who participated in competitive school activities, the American Civil Liberties Union alleged in a suit filed against the district. A policy adopted earlier this year by the Shasta Union High School District is overly broad because it allows for testing students for drugs when there is no reason to suspect them, attorneys wrote in the suit. District Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1986 | Juan Arancibia \f7
A request that the city consider mandatory drug testing for city management personnel and elected officials has met with no opposition. City Councilman Cornelius M. Coronado Jr. made the proposal at Monday's council meeting. Earlier, city officials said such testing was being considered. Also at Monday's meeting, Councilman John Kanel said the council should adopt a resolution condemning professional sports leagues for what he called their relaxed rules on drug abuse.
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