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October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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NATIONAL
August 14, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Just after noon Monday, Brazos County Constable Brian Bachmann embarked on a seemingly routine chore — serving an eviction notice in a pleasant neighborhood a few blocks from Texas A&M University. But a man at the house on Fidelity Street opened fire, killing Bachmann, 41. That triggered a 30-minute shootout with police that left the gunman and a bystander dead in an outbreak of violence that shocked this serene college town. Police killed the gunman, but not before he shot and killed a 43-year-old man and wounded a 55-year-old woman.
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NEWS
November 21, 1985 | Associated Press
Gordon P. Eaton, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Texas A&M University, on Wednesday was named president of Iowa State University, succeeding W. Robert Parks, who retired.
SPORTS
March 18, 2007 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
Danielle Gant matched a career high by scoring 24 points Saturday in the Galen Center to lead Texas A&M to a 58-50 victory over Texas Arlington in the opening round of the NCAA women's basketball tournament. Gant, a sophomore who also led the Aggies with 14 rebounds, scored 20 points in the second half and made eight of 10 shots overall in helping Texas A&M (25-6) advance to the second round of the Dallas Regional.
SPORTS
January 6, 1994 | DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NCAA sent a stern message Wednesday to one of its oft-troubled members, Texas A&M, taking the unusual step of placing the school on probation for five years as a result of rules violations involving the Aggies' football program. Only two other schools--Southeastern Louisiana and Upsala College--have received probationary periods of a similar duration from the NCAA.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists at Texas A&M University in College Station unveiled a disease-resistant black Angus bull, saying it could lead to safer beef and more efficient ranching worldwide. The month-old calf, called Bull 86 Squared, was cloned from genetic material frozen 15 years ago from Bull 86.
SPORTS
June 2, 1989
El Toro High School shortstop Sean Drinkwater has signed a letter of intent to attend Texas A&M University on a baseball scholarship. As a senior, Drinkwater hit .345 with six home runs and 20 RBIs, and he helped lead El Toro into the Southern Section 3-A title game as a junior. He also played football and was among the top wide receivers in the county last fall. Drinkwater also visited Arizona, Arizona State and Wyoming before choosing Texas A&M. He plans to major in business.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | Associated Press
The population of Texas is growing at about half the rate it grew during the boom years of 1980-82, and preliminary figures for 1986 suggest that growth may be stabilizing, a report released Thursday said. Natural increase, the excess of births over deaths, accounted for most of the population increase, said Steve Murdock, head of the Rural Sociology Department at Texas A&M University. "The state's population is still growing. It grew from 14.2 million people in 1980 to 16.
SPORTS
September 10, 1988
The National Collegiate Athletic Assn. placed Texas A&M on probation for two years and declared it ineligible for bowl competition this season, and the Southwest Conference said that the Aggies could not compete for the league football championship because of major recruiting violations. According to the NCAA Friday, Texas A&M committed 16 violations and failed to "exercise appropriate institutional control" over its athletic department.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
The last Texas A&M University student to be rescued from last year's fatal bonfire collapse was released from the hospital Friday. John Comstock, 19, was upbeat as he left Zale Lipshy University Hospital after five months. "I want to try to get back to A&M by next spring," he said. Comstock, a freshman, was wiring logs together on the fourth tier of the 40-foot stack of logs when it fell Nov. 18.
SPORTS
March 12, 2007 | David Wharton
On a Texas A&M team where guard Acie Law IV grabs most of the spotlight, sophomore Josh Carter has quietly become the most accurate long-range shooter in the nation, making 51.9% of his three-point attempts. Carter's marksmanship began in a late November game against Idaho State when he made eight of 10 three-point attempts.
SPORTS
June 23, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texas earned a spot in the championship round and Arizona State stayed alive Wednesday in the College World Series at Omaha, Neb. Chance Wheeless homered leading off the bottom of the ninth inning to give Texas a 4-3 victory over Baylor. "When he hit the home run, I thanked him and his mother and father and their mothers and fathers and anybody who had anything to do with Chance being on this planet," Texas Coach Augie Garrido said.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
A team of French and American researchers has successfully cloned a horse, Texas A&M University officials announced Wednesday. The foal was named Paris Texas. The university believes it's the first successful cloned horse in North America; horses have previously been cloned in Italy. "Look at him, he's gorgeous," Katrin Hinrichs, the lead scientist on the project said just before the 6-week-old, light-brown foal made his public debut.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Families of seven students killed or injured when a stack of bonfire logs collapsed at Texas A&M have reached a $4.25-million partial settlement of a lawsuit, attorneys in Houston said. The settlement resolves claims against 25 of 35 student leaders who oversaw construction of the 59-foot-high stack, which fell five years ago, killing 12 and injuring 27. The lawsuit is scheduled for trial next year against three dozen other defendants.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
With a burst of flame answered by a deafening roar from the crowd, an unsanctioned Texas A&M University bonfire sprang to life Sunday night, rekindling a tradition on hold since a deadly collapse that killed 12 people in 1999. A group of current and former A&M students calling themselves Unity Project unofficially resurrected the event. "It's great to have it come back," said sophomore Samuel Rogers, 24.
SPORTS
November 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The sounds of buzzing chain saws and toppling trees filled a nearby forest Saturday as Texas A&M students and alumni worked to revive their bonfire tradition, on hold since a deadly collapse in 1999. Wearing colored hard hats signifying leadership positions and wielding axes and machetes, the volunteers searched the woods east of College Station for dead elm trees to cut down and eventually burn. They plan to light a 10- to 15-foot-high, off-campus bonfire Nov. 24.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Four stabilizing ropes were cut on the stack of bonfire logs at Texas A&M University in College Station just hours before it collapsed and killed 12, a report said. But a senior who helped build the bonfire last year said the cutting of the lines was a standard procedure and probably did not cause the collapse. Douglas Keegan visited the site of the 7,000-log stack about an hour before the disaster, which also injured 27 on Nov. 18.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The usually raucous Texas A&M University bonfire was to be replaced by a solemn candlelight ceremony today as the school marked the first anniversary of last year's bonfire collapse that killed 12 people. The 90-year-old tradition turned tragic when the 60-foot-high student-built log structure fell while still under construction in College Station. Along with the dead, 27 others were injured in the crush of logs.
NEWS
August 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
The worst-injured survivor of the Texas A&M bonfire collapse returned to campus Monday almost two years after he was pinned under the fallen logs. John Comstock, 21, began the school year Monday with a business math class. It follows a long road to recovery, including surgery and months of intensive physical therapy. Comstock's left leg was amputated below the knee and he is partly paralyzed. "I want to get on with being a regular college student," said Comstock, a biomedical sciences major.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists at Texas A&M University in College Station unveiled a disease-resistant black Angus bull, saying it could lead to safer beef and more efficient ranching worldwide. The month-old calf, called Bull 86 Squared, was cloned from genetic material frozen 15 years ago from Bull 86.
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