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NEWS
August 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Gov. Ann Richards, who ridiculed George Bush six years ago, has insulted his son as "some jerk who's running for public office." Richards' spokesman, Chuck McDonald, said she was angry about a contention by George W. Bush, her Republican rival this year, that student achievement scores and school-rating systems were juggled in an election-year effort to make Texas education look better. The governor believes that the progress is because of hard work by children and teachers, McDonald said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2005 | Liz Austin, Associated Press
Singing soprano is for girls only in Texas' elite All-State Choir, eliminating a 17-year-old boy's chance to audition for a statewide honor and raising questions about gender discrimination. The Texas Music Educators Assn. last month denied a request from Mikhael Rawls to audition this fall as a soprano, a part traditionally sung by girls. Rawls sings countertenor, a little-known male voice part that has surged in popularity in classical and operatic circles.
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NEWS
May 1, 1990 | DAVID MARANISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The nation's third-largest public education system entered a period of uncertainty and potential financial calamity Monday night when the state of Texas failed to enact a plan equalizing funding for rich and poor school districts. The Texas Supreme Court last fall declared the present system unconstitutionally inequitable.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Texas is among the most effective and California among the least in helping students at all income levels learn, according to a nationwide study released Tuesday. The finding was immediately seized upon by aides to the Republican presidential candidate, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, as proof that school reforms are working in his home state. But the eagerly awaited Rand Corp.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Texas schools have long been known for producing powerhouse prep football teams. But in the past few years the state has received national attention for its academic prowess, most notably for narrowing the persistent gap in test scores between white and minority students. The gains have been attributed to a pioneering accountability and testing system in which schools are labeled exemplary to low-performing based on test scores and attendance rates.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Texas Board of Education voted to keep tobacco stocks despite protests that owning the shares sends conflicting signals to schoolchildren. The board rejected on a vote of 8 to 6 a proposal to divest 1.5 million shares of Philip Morris Cos. stock, worth at least $94 million, from the Permanent School Fund. "If you go through our portfolio I guarantee you'll find a substantial number of stocks that someone will object to," said board member Bob Akin of Commerce, Tex.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Gathered together in their Sacramento office not long ago, the top three California education officials who track school performance were asked this question: Are students doing better or worse these days? Their answer: a collective shrug. "That's not our responsibility," one said. The problem is, it's no one's responsibility. California spends $36 billion--more than the entire budgets of many states--on education.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Texas is among the most effective and California among the least in helping students at all income levels learn, according to a nationwide study released Tuesday. The finding was immediately seized upon by aides to the Republican presidential candidate, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, as proof that school reforms are working in his home state. But the eagerly awaited Rand Corp.
SPORTS
December 7, 1991 | DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reporters from across the nation trooped into this West Texas oil town last year, their interest piqued by the high-powered football program at Odessa's Permian High, their questions dealing with the same themes: Academic shortcuts. Improper preseason workouts. Racism. The 1990 season was not, to put it mildly, a stellar one for the Permian Panthers, the pride of Odessa.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | Associated Press
School officials have asked parents to discipline their children if they are caught speaking Spanish at school as part of a campaign to improve grades, the superintendent said Wednesday. "We're not out to start some kind of controversy," Francis Brooks said. "The only thing we're looking to do is help our kids do a little better." Brooks said he mailed about 370 letters on Wednesday, one for each child in the Tornillo Independent School District, asking parents to voluntarily sign a contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding a tortuous yearlong search, Los Angeles community college leaders announced Wednesday that they have hired a former leader of a Texas college as president of Mission College, the district's smallest and most-crowded campus. Adriana Barrera, 49, former president of El Paso Community College, topped a field of 35 applicants and four finalists. She will begin work July 1, drawing an annual salary of $121,000.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Texas schools have long been known for producing powerhouse prep football teams. But in the past few years the state has received national attention for its academic prowess, most notably for narrowing the persistent gap in test scores between white and minority students. The gains have been attributed to a pioneering accountability and testing system in which schools are labeled exemplary to low-performing based on test scores and attendance rates.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Gathered together in their Sacramento office not long ago, the top three California education officials who track school performance were asked this question: Are students doing better or worse these days? Their answer: a collective shrug. "That's not our responsibility," one said. The problem is, it's no one's responsibility. California spends $36 billion--more than the entire budgets of many states--on education.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Gov. Ann Richards, who ridiculed George Bush six years ago, has insulted his son as "some jerk who's running for public office." Richards' spokesman, Chuck McDonald, said she was angry about a contention by George W. Bush, her Republican rival this year, that student achievement scores and school-rating systems were juggled in an election-year effort to make Texas education look better. The governor believes that the progress is because of hard work by children and teachers, McDonald said.
SPORTS
December 7, 1991 | DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reporters from across the nation trooped into this West Texas oil town last year, their interest piqued by the high-powered football program at Odessa's Permian High, their questions dealing with the same themes: Academic shortcuts. Improper preseason workouts. Racism. The 1990 season was not, to put it mildly, a stellar one for the Permian Panthers, the pride of Odessa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 42-year-old Texas educator--experienced in weathering steep budget cuts--is expected to fill one of the highest ranking positions in the Ventura County Community College District, officials said Tuesday. Chancellor Thomas Lakin will ask the Board of Trustees to approve the nomination of Jeff Marsee when the board meets Dec. 10. Marsee, an administrator at a community college district in Houston, would replace Tom Kimberling as vice chancellor for administrative services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Services for Homer Price Rainey, who was ousted as president of the University of Texas in a battle over what he saw as academic freedom, were held here Monday. The former president of four institutions of higher learning died Thursday at 89. In 1944, the Texas Board of Regents fired Rainey, after he protested board actions that he said had limited academic freedom. He had been appointed president of the South's largest university in 1939, after gaining a reputation as a education critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2005 | Liz Austin, Associated Press
Singing soprano is for girls only in Texas' elite All-State Choir, eliminating a 17-year-old boy's chance to audition for a statewide honor and raising questions about gender discrimination. The Texas Music Educators Assn. last month denied a request from Mikhael Rawls to audition this fall as a soprano, a part traditionally sung by girls. Rawls sings countertenor, a little-known male voice part that has surged in popularity in classical and operatic circles.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Texas Board of Education voted to keep tobacco stocks despite protests that owning the shares sends conflicting signals to schoolchildren. The board rejected on a vote of 8 to 6 a proposal to divest 1.5 million shares of Philip Morris Cos. stock, worth at least $94 million, from the Permanent School Fund. "If you go through our portfolio I guarantee you'll find a substantial number of stocks that someone will object to," said board member Bob Akin of Commerce, Tex.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | DAVID MARANISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The nation's third-largest public education system entered a period of uncertainty and potential financial calamity Monday night when the state of Texas failed to enact a plan equalizing funding for rich and poor school districts. The Texas Supreme Court last fall declared the present system unconstitutionally inequitable.
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