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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rickey Dale Thomas walked out of the Hopkins County jail Wednesday morning to freedom and a new life. All that prodding from the outside had finally worked. All the effort had finally paid off. And then, of course, there was the matter of luck. The life sentence that had hung over his head for so long was wiped out in a few minutes as Dist. Atty. Frank Long requested that the theft conviction be overturned.
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NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Carla Hall
It wasn't a surprise, but it's still a disappointment that the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which sits in New Orleans, upheld the onerous new Texas abortion law and overruled the smart opinion of U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel, who had seen fit to overturn aspects of it. The law requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where they work. But some doctors who don't have privileges would have to go through a lengthy process to get them, and don't need them to perform abortions.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major victory for consumers, a federal judge on Friday upheld an unprecedented Texas law that allows patients to sue their health plans for malpractice. The ruling, consumer activists say, could bolster efforts to pass similar legislation in California and more than a dozen other states. After hearing of the ruling, California Assemblyman Martin Gallegos (D-Baldwin Park) said he plans to reintroduce a similar law when the Legislature reconvenes in December.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court cleared the way Tuesday for Texas to enforce a strict new abortion regulation that opponents say prevents a third of the state's clinics from performing the procedure. The court, in a 5-4 vote, split along ideological lines in turning down an appeal to block the law that abortion rights advocates challenged as unconstitutional. The measure, adopted by Texas lawmakers in July, requires that abortion providers have a doctor on their staffs who has admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the clinic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The pop music obscenity battle moves from Florida to Texas today with jury selection scheduled to begin in the Bexar County trial of Hogwild Records store owner Dave Risher. Risher was charged with violating Texas obscenity penal codes on June 28 after he sold a copy of 2 Live Crew's raunchy rap record "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" to the 20-year-old son of San Antonio's leading anti-pornography crusader.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | KAREN BRANDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Past a long fence dotted by clumps of cactus and beyond a couple of turns in a dusty farm road, Ronnie Pucek hit a big gusher and a bigger controversy. It wasn't oil he found, but water. Lots of it. When drillers made the strike in the spring, it was something of huge proportions, a fountain that spurted some 50 feet high and nearly washed away the drilling rig. It is believed to be one of the world's largest man-made artesian wells, producing about 30,000 gallons of water a minute.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2002 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state of Texas filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit Monday against Farmers Group of Insurance Cos., alleging the Los Angeles company charged Texas policyholders higher premiums to pay for disasters in other states, improperly used credit histories to set rates and wrongly limited coverage for water damage.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
A bizarre custody battle between the children of automotive legend Carroll Shelby and the last of his seven wives has left his body stuck in a Dallas County morgue while a Texas court decides who gets to dispose of his remains. Shelby, a famed auto designer, has been in the morgue since his death May 10. His children want to cremate him, and his surviving wife has said she wants to decide what happens to his remains. Adding to the imbroglio is a cryptic comment by Dallas County Medical Examiner Dr. Jeffrey Barnard, who said he was in control of the body "because an allegation was made which falls within" Texas laws pertaining to criminal procedure.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Texas judge unexpectedly dismissed obscenity charges on Monday against a San Antonio record store owner and chastised prosecutors in the case over an album by rappers 2 Live Crew. "It's beyond me that it would take six months to determine this is not a prosecutable case," Bexar County Court-at-Law Judge Tony Jimenez told assistant district attorneys, who requested that the charges against retailer Dave Risher, 36, be dropped. The dismissal came only hours before jury selection was to begin.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An increasing number of states are adopting an unusual weapon in the war on drugs: They are starting to establish taxes on the sale of illegal narcotics, then using drug dealers' failure to pay the taxes as additional grounds for prosecuting them. The idea is a variation on the technique the federal government used against Mafia mobster Al Capone and others during the Prohibition days of the 1920s.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Planned Parenthood and others opponents of new Texas abortion restrictions have appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate an injunction blocking portions of the law concerning doctors' admitting privileges. The appeal was filed with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who gave state officials until next Tuesday to file a response before he rules. Scalia could rule on the injunction himself or refer the issue to the full court. Opponents said Monday that because of the new restrictions, a third of the state's licensed health centers have had to stop providing abortion services, including at least 14 providers, which will restrict abortion access to about 20,000 women annually.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - A three-judge panel of the federal appeals court in New Orleans lifted an injunction Thursday mostly allowing the state's new abortion restrictions to take effect. The decision came three days after a federal judge in Texas blocked some of the restrictions that he found unconstitutional, including a provision requiring doctors at abortion clinics to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and limits on medication-induced abortions. But the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals panel sided with state officials who asked for an emergency stay so that the new law could take effect pending a final decision.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - A federal appeals court allowed most of Texas' new abortion restrictions to take effect immediately, lifting an injunction Thursday that had suspended much of the law. The decision came three days after U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel in Austin blocked restrictions that he found unconstitutional, including one that requires doctors at abortion clinics to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals and another that limits medication-induced abortions....
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A federal judge is expected to rule Monday on the constitutionality of a controversial Texas abortion law set to take effect Tuesday. Last week, U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel heard three days of testimony and oral arguments in Austin about the law, which opponents sued to block after its passage this past summer . The law would limit medication-induced abortions and require doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals to perform abortions,...
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Some controversial new Texas abortion restrictions are unconstitutional and will not take effect as scheduled Tuesday, a federal judge ruled Monday. "Today's ruling marks an important victory for Texas women and sends a clear message to lawmakers: It is unconstitutional for politicians to pass laws that take personal, private decisions away from women and their doctors," said Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. After Texas lawmakers approved the new restrictions last summer, Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers challenged them in court, arguing that they unfairly limited medication-induced abortions and forced doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals near the abortion clinics where they worked, effectively closing a third of clinics statewide.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration moved aggressively Thursday to reassert federal power and block state laws that allegedly violate the civil rights of minority voters, an authority that the Supreme Court had substantially weakened last month by striking down a portion of the Voting Rights Act. The announcement by Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. made Texas the administration's test case and first target, all but guaranteeing a full-scale political and legal battle with that state's conservative Republican leadership.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | Associated Press
Next January, Texans can legally carry concealed guns for the first time since frontier days, thanks to a bill signed by Gov. George W. Bush on Friday. "This is a bill to make Texas a safer place," Bush said. People over 21 can begin seeking permits in September and can carry pistols as of Jan. 1, if they undergo 10 to 15 hours of training and pass a proficiency exam. A four-year permit costs $140, except for individuals 60 or older and the indigent, who pay $70.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
A bizarre custody battle between the children of automotive legend Carroll Shelby and the last of his seven wives has left his body stuck in a Dallas County morgue while a Texas court decides who gets to dispose of his remains. Shelby, a famed auto designer, has been in the morgue since his death May 10. His children want to cremate him, and his surviving wife has said she wants to decide what happens to his remains. Adding to the imbroglio is a cryptic comment by Dallas County Medical Examiner Dr. Jeffrey Barnard, who said he was in control of the body "because an allegation was made which falls within" Texas laws pertaining to criminal procedure.
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