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NATIONAL
June 29, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court gave politicians legal license Wednesday to aggressively redraw election districts to benefit the party in power, as it upheld the mid-decade redistricting plan engineered by former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and other Texas Republicans. By clever line-drawing, DeLay and the Texas Legislature -- with both houses newly under GOP control in 2003 -- remade its delegation in Congress, turning a 17-15 Democratic majority into a 21-11 Republican majority in 2004.
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NATIONAL
March 5, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
More than a year after a bitter showdown in Texas, Republicans and Democrats are battling elsewhere over the drawing of congressional district lines. And the renewed confrontation could help fuel the drive for redistricting reform in other states, including California. The latest clash has been triggered by the Republican-controlled state legislature in Georgia, which is about to toss out the congressional districts approved in 2001 and impose a new map that could help the GOP win more U.S.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court gave an early win to Texas Republicans in the fight over redrawing election districts and the balance of power in Congress, ruling that the district lines should mostly follow those set by GOP lawmakers and not those by judges who drew new boundaries to favor Latinos. The 9-0 decision set aside a new map of congressional districts drawn by a special federal court in San Antonio that gave Latinos and Democrats a good chance to win three or possibly four new seats in the House of Representatives.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2006 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
At a campaign stop last week, congressional candidate Shelley Sekula-Gibbs asked a group of women who own businesses to vote for her twice in November: once in a special election to fill the unexpired term of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, and again in the general election as the Republican write-in candidate running for the full two-year term.
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Enron Corp. debacle is increasing pressure on lawmakers to close a loophole in the nation's bankruptcy code that allows millionaires in Texas, Florida and several other states to declare bankruptcy--and keep their mansions. From the start, the federal bankruptcy laws have included some exemptions set by the states. Bankrupt homeowners in many states are allowed to keep a basic dwelling.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 27-year-old Rick Green won a seat as the youngest member of the Texas House of Representatives two years ago, Gov. George W. Bush nicknamed him "Landslide Green." It was a joke. Green, a conservative Republican from Dripping Springs, had been a loser on election night--just 20 votes behind the Democratic incumbent. It was only after his family persuaded him to request a recount that the tide turned and Green won by 36 votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
When Karl Rove starts truth-squadding fellow Texas Republicans over the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, you know there are some tall tales floating around. On Sunday, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) told Chris Wallace of Fox News: “You know what's interesting? Last week, the Wall Street Journal, for the first time in years, found Republicans are leading on healthcare. Americans trust Republicans more than Democrats on healthcare.” A few minutes later, Rove, a Fox analyst, called him out. “I do want to correct one small thing that Sen. Cruz said,” Rove said.
OPINION
October 2, 2005 | Ethan Rarick, ETHAN RARICK, acting director of the Center on Politics at the UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies, is the author of "California Rising: The Life and Times of Pat Brown" (UC Press, 2005).
THE BIG PROBLEM with Proposition 77, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's ballot measure to create a new system for drawing legislative and congressional boundaries, is that it's much too fair. Well, there are other flaws too, beginning with the fact that the initiative would require an immediate redistricting, to be completed too hastily using 2000 census data made musty by half a decade of frenetic growth in California.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court will take up states' rights -- of both the blue- and red-state variety -- in a pair of election-law cases to be heard this week that could have a big impact on the future of American politics. Tiny Vermont, a true blue state, hopes to restore small-town democracy by greatly limiting the role of money in politics. If its new spending caps win before the high court, they could change how campaigns are conducted across the nation.
NEWS
September 25, 1985 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
In a glum assessment of national economic conditions, Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) said Tuesday that because of congressional concern about trade issues and the budget deficit, the chances of enacting any tax changes are "very slim" this year and "fatter, but not robust" for 1986. At a breakfast session with reporters and editors of The Times' Washington Bureau, Wilson said he could detect "no great groundswell" of support for tax revision, one of President Reagan's top domestic priorities.
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