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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Wendy Davis became a media star Tuesday, even though the major TV networks barely mentioned her. The 50-year-old Texas state senator waged a 10-hour-plus filibuster in Austin aimed at blocking a bill that would ban abortions at 20 weeks and force the state's abortion clinics to upgrade or close. In a dramatic example of the disconnect between social and mainstream media, Twitter and Facebook were aflame with arguments over the filibuster as it was happening, while TV news networks generally paid little or no attention, at least at first.
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NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - The woman who wants to be the next Texas governor stood at a podium in an inner-city community center here last week, a polished blond in a tailored pink jacket, black slacks and heels, and invoked her rags-to-riches narrative. "The promise of Texas is that where you start does not determine where you go," state Sen. Wendy Davis said. Davis, a Democrat, is attempting to sell Texas voters on her transformation from single mother in a Fort Worth trailer park to Harvard-educated lawyer and state lawmaker gracing the pages of Vogue.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court gave politicians legal license Wednesday to aggressively redraw election districts to benefit the party in power, as it upheld the mid-decade redistricting plan engineered by former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and other Texas Republicans. By clever line-drawing, DeLay and the Texas Legislature -- with both houses newly under GOP control in 2003 -- remade its delegation in Congress, turning a 17-15 Democratic majority into a 21-11 Republican majority in 2004.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
More than a year after a bitter showdown in Texas, Republicans and Democrats are battling elsewhere over the drawing of congressional district lines. And the renewed confrontation could help fuel the drive for redistricting reform in other states, including California. The latest clash has been triggered by the Republican-controlled state legislature in Georgia, which is about to toss out the congressional districts approved in 2001 and impose a new map that could help the GOP win more U.S.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2006 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
At a campaign stop last week, congressional candidate Shelley Sekula-Gibbs asked a group of women who own businesses to vote for her twice in November: once in a special election to fill the unexpired term of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, and again in the general election as the Republican write-in candidate running for the full two-year term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
When Karl Rove starts truth-squadding fellow Texas Republicans over the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, you know there are some tall tales floating around. On Sunday, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) told Chris Wallace of Fox News: “You know what's interesting? Last week, the Wall Street Journal, for the first time in years, found Republicans are leading on healthcare. Americans trust Republicans more than Democrats on healthcare.” A few minutes later, Rove, a Fox analyst, called him out. “I do want to correct one small thing that Sen. Cruz said,” Rove said.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- In the debate over energy and climate change, the public continues to give support to both sides, according to a a new poll. By more than a 2-1 margin, respondents in a new Pew Research Center poll said they favor building the Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry oil from tar sands deposits under Canada's western prairies through the Midwest to refineries in Texas. Republicans in Congress have strongly advocated building the pipeline, while President Obama has given mixed signals on the project, saying he would approve it only if doing so would not contribute to global warming.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court will take up states' rights -- of both the blue- and red-state variety -- in a pair of election-law cases to be heard this week that could have a big impact on the future of American politics. Tiny Vermont, a true blue state, hopes to restore small-town democracy by greatly limiting the role of money in politics. If its new spending caps win before the high court, they could change how campaigns are conducted across the nation.
NEWS
September 25, 1985 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
In a glum assessment of national economic conditions, Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) said Tuesday that because of congressional concern about trade issues and the budget deficit, the chances of enacting any tax changes are "very slim" this year and "fatter, but not robust" for 1986. At a breakfast session with reporters and editors of The Times' Washington Bureau, Wilson said he could detect "no great groundswell" of support for tax revision, one of President Reagan's top domestic priorities.
NATIONAL
October 26, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
When U.S. District Judge Joe Estes of Dallas died on his 86th birthday, they held his funeral at the Highland Park United Methodist Church. His former law clerk Harriet E. Miers gave the eulogy. "The verdict is sure and unanimous," she said. "Judge Estes was a great man." Estes was Miers' first mentor, her hero in the law, the role model who changed her life after her father became seriously ill and before she was drawn headfirst into the world of George W. Bush.
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