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September 27, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The masked intruders burst into Ace Knitting Co. just before 11 p.m. They stuck a pistol to the head of the lone employee, bound his wrists with shoelaces, then sped away with a truckload of booty. The target of their carefully woven scheme: bolts of spandex fabric. Long the bane of the fashion police, the body-hugging fiber is now bedeviling local law enforcement.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time was when Kenny Dunkel was welcome in any textile factory in Southern California. Dunkel is an equipment mover. And during the 1990s he delivered hundreds of gleaming new knitting machines to the region's bustling fabric mills. Eager textile entrepreneurs tipped his crews, bought them lunch and gave them plenty of repeat business. These days, Dunkel and his employees are more likely to be shown the door than the welcome mat. They're still busy hauling textile equipment.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time was when Kenny Dunkel was welcome in any textile factory in Southern California. Dunkel is an equipment mover. And during the 1990s he delivered hundreds of gleaming new knitting machines to the region's bustling fabric mills. Eager textile entrepreneurs tipped his crews, bought them lunch and gave them plenty of repeat business. These days, Dunkel and his employees are more likely to be shown the door than the welcome mat. They're still busy hauling textile equipment.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The masked intruders burst into Ace Knitting Co. just before 11 p.m. They stuck a pistol to the head of the lone employee, bound his wrists with shoelaces, then sped away with a truckload of booty. The target of their carefully woven scheme: bolts of spandex fabric. Long the bane of the fashion police, the body-hugging fiber is now bedeviling local law enforcement.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you take the nickel tour of Arnold Lorber's textile plant in Carson, bring a phrase book. Make that several. On the shop floor, Lorber chats with workers in staccato Spanish, one of nine languages he has mastered in 50-plus years in the textile trade. He introduces a visitor to his Russian computer expert, a German dyer and an Israeli plant manager. He then touches the keypad of a sophisticated fabric finishing machine programmed in four languages: English, Italian, German and Spanish.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1988 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
In a one-story factory near downtown Los Angeles, Edward Drasin stands in front of a row of knitting machines. The machines hum as giant spools of colorful yarn unravel into their bowels to emerge as yards of geometric-patterned knitted fabric. Around the corner, some workers wash and pre-shrink the cloth. Across the room from Drasin, president of Drasin Knitting Mills Inc.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you take the nickel tour of Arnold Lorber's textile plant in Carson, bring a phrase book. Make that several. On the shop floor, Lorber chats with workers in staccato Spanish, one of nine languages he has mastered in 50-plus years in the textile trade. He introduces a visitor to his Russian computer expert, a German dyer and an Israeli plant manager. He then touches the keypad of a sophisticated fabric finishing machine programmed in four languages: English, Italian, German and Spanish.
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