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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986
Shakespeare, Shaw, Ibsen and a few others foolish enough to write for the theater would have flunked Mark Medoff's "volleyball course" in playwriting. The "gang" theory of disemboweling the playwright's work began with the Group Theatre and was further refined by the theatrical Talmudist, Lee Strasberg. "The Method" encourages extra-textual and sub-textual tampering by actors, resulting in massive distortion and eventual demolition of the original work. Improvisation is now the device of the actor and director who believe they can "improve" a play.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
'The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess' (PS Classics) Gershwin purists, this "Porgy and Bess" is probably not for you, even though its official title is "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess. " The cast album of the current Broadway production is a streamlined version of a score that can run longer than three hours when done in its entirety. This two-disc recording is not just shorter, but it also takes liberties that have rankled traditionalists. "Summertime" is performed as a romantic duet; sections of recitative have been converted to spoken dialogue; and the orchestra has been scaled down for a Broadway house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004
I would like to thank Thomas Curwen for his imaginative approach to the story about Edward Gorey ("Light From a Dark Star," July 18). The skeletal "Mystery" woman who, just before fainting, screamed her way into my family room every Sunday evening remained nameless until I happened upon Curwen's piece. His treatment of the story of this artist was most provocative, especially the manner in which he injected into the textual information vivid descriptions of Gorey's work. It was written as if Gorey himself had sketched it. Kathleen Clary Miller San Juan Capistrano
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Leah Ollman
"Changing the Focus: Latin American Photography 1990-2005" doesn't pretend to be a comprehensive survey. Thankfully. It's not an act of curatorial acrobatics that forces disparate works together through conceptual stretching and contextual twisting. Instead, it's a moderately scaled sampling, thoughtful, but not oppressively thought-out. Anchored by familiar names (Alfredo Jaar, Vik Muniz, Gabriel Orozco) and leavened by lesser-knowns, the show -- at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach -- doesn't strain to make a case for itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1990
Regarding Charles Champlin's Feb. 8 column on who wrote Shakespeare's works: A group of graduate students, under my direction, have unearthed several dust-covered documents and pursued various phililogic and textual theories that have revealed an historic fact: Charles Champlin does not exist. One of my students has drawn up a lengthy article that shows, upon philological and semiotic analysis, that much of "Champlin's" articles are but a compilation of others: a snippet of Michael Wilmington's attitude, a graft of Kevin Thomas' esoterica, a collocation of Sheila Benson's critical vengeance.
OPINION
April 25, 2005
Re "To Dems, It's 1974 Forever," Commentary, April 22: David Gelernter has it a bit wrong when he says the Republicans and the Democrats have pulled the "Big Switch." Rather than this neat little "swap" of philosophies, what has happened is what I like to call the "Continental Drift" theory of American politics. Over the last 40 years both parties have steadily, yet nearly imperceptibly, drifted to the left. Today, if we took a satellite snapshot of the political landscape and compared it with one taken in the early to mid-'60s, we would notice that the Republicans are in a position today that was occupied by the Dems then.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
Euripides' "Medea" taps into primal emotions that frighten and fascinate us in equal measure. Try as you may to interpret the tale of a wife who, having sacrificed everything for her husband, murders their children to punish him for his unfaithfulness, there's a mystery, a strangeness at the heart of this shocking crime that is ultimately irreducible. That strangeness is taken to a new level in UCLA Live's whirligig production, which opened Wednesday at the Freud Playhouse with an unsteady Annette Bening in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
'The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess' (PS Classics) Gershwin purists, this "Porgy and Bess" is probably not for you, even though its official title is "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess. " The cast album of the current Broadway production is a streamlined version of a score that can run longer than three hours when done in its entirety. This two-disc recording is not just shorter, but it also takes liberties that have rankled traditionalists. "Summertime" is performed as a romantic duet; sections of recitative have been converted to spoken dialogue; and the orchestra has been scaled down for a Broadway house.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | EILEEN SONDAK
Whoever heard of David Gordon? Not many San Diego dance buffs, judging from the sparse audience on hand Friday night for the local debut of Gordon's Pick Up Co. More's the pity, since this doyen of post-modern dance and his sleek New York-based ensemble offered a strikingly free-flowing sneak preview of "United States," a huge patchwork quilt of a piece scheduled to be premiered at Kennedy Center in September. And, unlike most imported dance works, this evening-long mix of movement, words and music, had ties to San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Leah Ollman
"Changing the Focus: Latin American Photography 1990-2005" doesn't pretend to be a comprehensive survey. Thankfully. It's not an act of curatorial acrobatics that forces disparate works together through conceptual stretching and contextual twisting. Instead, it's a moderately scaled sampling, thoughtful, but not oppressively thought-out. Anchored by familiar names (Alfredo Jaar, Vik Muniz, Gabriel Orozco) and leavened by lesser-knowns, the show -- at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach -- doesn't strain to make a case for itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
Euripides' "Medea" taps into primal emotions that frighten and fascinate us in equal measure. Try as you may to interpret the tale of a wife who, having sacrificed everything for her husband, murders their children to punish him for his unfaithfulness, there's a mystery, a strangeness at the heart of this shocking crime that is ultimately irreducible. That strangeness is taken to a new level in UCLA Live's whirligig production, which opened Wednesday at the Freud Playhouse with an unsteady Annette Bening in the title role.
OPINION
April 25, 2005
Re "To Dems, It's 1974 Forever," Commentary, April 22: David Gelernter has it a bit wrong when he says the Republicans and the Democrats have pulled the "Big Switch." Rather than this neat little "swap" of philosophies, what has happened is what I like to call the "Continental Drift" theory of American politics. Over the last 40 years both parties have steadily, yet nearly imperceptibly, drifted to the left. Today, if we took a satellite snapshot of the political landscape and compared it with one taken in the early to mid-'60s, we would notice that the Republicans are in a position today that was occupied by the Dems then.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004
I would like to thank Thomas Curwen for his imaginative approach to the story about Edward Gorey ("Light From a Dark Star," July 18). The skeletal "Mystery" woman who, just before fainting, screamed her way into my family room every Sunday evening remained nameless until I happened upon Curwen's piece. His treatment of the story of this artist was most provocative, especially the manner in which he injected into the textual information vivid descriptions of Gorey's work. It was written as if Gorey himself had sketched it. Kathleen Clary Miller San Juan Capistrano
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: What do the new edition of "Huckleberry Finn," the top-selling recording in the country and the director's cut of "Pulp Fiction" have in common? Answer: They all reflect America's growing obsession with outtakes. These days, it's not enough to enjoy a work of great art, whether it be a landmark American novel, an anthology of Beatles tunes or a smash-hit Hollywood film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1990
Regarding Charles Champlin's Feb. 8 column on who wrote Shakespeare's works: A group of graduate students, under my direction, have unearthed several dust-covered documents and pursued various phililogic and textual theories that have revealed an historic fact: Charles Champlin does not exist. One of my students has drawn up a lengthy article that shows, upon philological and semiotic analysis, that much of "Champlin's" articles are but a compilation of others: a snippet of Michael Wilmington's attitude, a graft of Kevin Thomas' esoterica, a collocation of Sheila Benson's critical vengeance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986
Shakespeare, Shaw, Ibsen and a few others foolish enough to write for the theater would have flunked Mark Medoff's "volleyball course" in playwriting. The "gang" theory of disemboweling the playwright's work began with the Group Theatre and was further refined by the theatrical Talmudist, Lee Strasberg. "The Method" encourages extra-textual and sub-textual tampering by actors, resulting in massive distortion and eventual demolition of the original work. Improvisation is now the device of the actor and director who believe they can "improve" a play.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: What do the new edition of "Huckleberry Finn," the top-selling recording in the country and the director's cut of "Pulp Fiction" have in common? Answer: They all reflect America's growing obsession with outtakes. These days, it's not enough to enjoy a work of great art, whether it be a landmark American novel, an anthology of Beatles tunes or a smash-hit Hollywood film.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
How many times have you researched a person on Facebook, Google and consulted friends and family before going out on a first date? I will admit that I always do my due diligence. (But don't we all?) A new app called Lulu aims to do the work for you by allowing its ladies-only users to secretly rate their male friends, lovers and ex-boyfriends on its online database of men. "Women love to share, they love to exchange information, and they love to have their experiences validated by both their friends and girls they don't necessarily know,” said Chief Executive Alexandra Chong, who came up with the idea over a six-hour brunch with girlfriends.
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