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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010 | By Melissa Magsaysay
That annual Oscar conundrum -- how to make a fashion statement on the red carpet while honoring tradition at the same time -- was solved this year with one easy concept: texture. The actresses who made some of the grandest entrances stuck to architectural details and dresses that looked as though they were sculpted for them. Whether it was the black and ivory frayed chiffon camellias adorning Diane Kruger's Chanel Haute Couture gown or the layers of pleated raspberry ruffles swirling down the front of Vera Farmiga's Marchesa frock, some of the most striking dresses came in 3-D this year -- no goggles required.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
March 10, 2014
Want to do something more creative with your tight living quarters but don't know where to start? Interior designer Heather Ashton offers some suggestions on how to deliver a big jolt of personality to a small living space. PHOTOS: At home with Heather Ashton Don't be scared of paint: Most people think a color, especially a darker tone, makes a small space look smaller. But you aren't fooling anyone, so have fun with it. Paint is an easy way to add personality and dimension to a room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Jay Kvapil's new, variably intriguing ceramic work at Couturier is largely about surface -- viscous, painterly glazes and cratered shells. With only a few exceptions, the vessel forms are understated and conventional. They call little attention to themselves and instead serve as vehicles for potent color and assertive texture. Kvapil titled an earlier series "Pictorial Vessels," making explicit the priority given to surface as bearer of image or mark. Several works here continue in that vein, their glazes like thick, draping garments extending below the cylindrical body of a cup or vase.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Grammy nominee for Album of the Year and Best Pop Solo Performance, Sara Bareilles, stepped out onto Sunday's red carpet wearing her hair wavy and heavily textured. Her hair stylist Rolando Beauchamp calls it “rough, beautiful hair to complement her soft, feminine Blumarine gown.” To achieve the look, Beauchamp started by prepping her damp hair with Garnier Fructis Style Deconstructed Beach Chic Texturizing Spray. He created the texture by rough-drying the hair and then twisting parts of it into loose cornrow braids from the front to the back of Bareilles' head.
IMAGE
January 3, 2010 | By Melissa Magsaysay
When black polka dot tights went down Balenciaga's fall runway, paired with immaculately draped skirts and soft velvet dresses, they provided a fresh take on the leg wear generally seen as either heavy and opaque or sheer and old-fashioned. Patterned tights have become a key accessory, adding another texture, print or layer to an outfit. Whether lacy, pinstriped or dotted, patterned tights add a playful quality to an otherwise simple ensemble. Treat them as you would any other item of clothing.
HOME & GARDEN
May 13, 2004 | Andrea R. Vaucher, Special to The Times
ALTHOUGH the Malibu Garden Club lists four private gardens on the schedule for its Sunday tour, it could have changed the number to six without being accused of inaccuracy: Liz Haft has created not one but three distinct gardens on her property in Point Dume. In front, a vibrant courtyard of pepper, jacaranda, citrus and olive trees, herbs, succulents and a pond, is pure Mediterranean.
HOME & GARDEN
March 6, 2008 | Paula Panich, Special to The Times
Chances are some South African beauty is nearby. You just don't know it. Calla lilies in bloom? How about trumpeting clivias? The strappy leaves of agapanthus? Those potted "geraniums" by your front door? They're not geraniums at all, but Pelargoniums from South Africa. Take almost any freeway, and a South African daisy offers a splash of color along the way. Many plants of South African origin fit so well in Southern California that we may not realize they aren't native to our own Mediterranean-climate region.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1995
Regarding the photo of director Nicholas Hytner by Al Seib on Page 3 of the Jan. 8 issue: The lighting, composition, color, texture and mood of this photograph are so outstanding, I almost took it to be a painting (and I mean this as the highest form of compliment). Everything about this photograph is so outstanding. The framing of the subject. The sunset glow pressed between the buildings below and a darkening sky from above--a sense of compression. The angle of the chair and the subject.
FOOD
January 21, 1993
All over America harried cooks rush home from work, throw some spaghetti into a pot of boiling water, top it with canned sauce and announce that dinner is ready. Before you start feeling sorry for their families, you should know this: The canned spaghetti sauces that we tasted were, for the most part, both inexpensive and good. Some are better than others, but generally these are very good products. The proof?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
A show of John Franklin Koenig's collages and paintings introduces an artist who has moved to Seattle after a lengthy stint in Europe. He's a deft designer who keeps us briefly entertained with a changing repertoire of materials, textures and other surface effects but fails to enlist prolonged interest. Koenig has been influenced by Oriental art and Abstract Expressionism and his current artwork perpetuates those interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Jay Kvapil's new, variably intriguing ceramic work at Couturier is largely about surface -- viscous, painterly glazes and cratered shells. With only a few exceptions, the vessel forms are understated and conventional. They call little attention to themselves and instead serve as vehicles for potent color and assertive texture. Kvapil titled an earlier series "Pictorial Vessels," making explicit the priority given to surface as bearer of image or mark. Several works here continue in that vein, their glazes like thick, draping garments extending below the cylindrical body of a cup or vase.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This year's fall pop music season offers your average 21st century bounty, one with so many colors, textures, varieties, personalities and avenues for consumption that it's pretty easy to frame an argument depending on mood or agenda. Those observing gender and the pop marketplace, for example, can note that the season is heavy with commercially powerful female vocalists: New albums from Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, Cher, Kelly Clarkson and future superstar Ariana Grande look to rule the charts through the holidays.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
How do you make a dish look appealing? It's one of the more frequent questions we hear in the Food section. Readers want to know what we do to make food look appetizing in a photo. While photographing naturally beautiful food really helps, there are a number of ways to manipulate both the dish and the viewer's eye. It really depends on the food itself and what we are trying to convey. Often, we play up the texture of a dish.  The slow drip of a creamy glaze, the rich crumble of shortbread or condensation beading on a cold drink can all help sell the shot.
FOOD
March 30, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
2012 Reichsrat von Buhl Pinot Noir Rosé On the East Coast, it's still snow and slush. But here, spring has sprung right on time. Cherry and plum trees are covered in blooms. Time for rosé. And here's a terrific one from Germany to usher in the season. Von Buhl winery in Pfalz produces this lovely Pinot Noir rosé. Pale salmon pink, it is crisp and dry, with soft, beautiful fruit and a silken texture. Have a glass before dinner, or with a light first course of marinated vegetables, a salad, or poached salmon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
The surfaces of Adam Silverman's new clay pots at Edward Cella feel generated by organic forces over time. Some are crusty and cratered, like hardened lava. Some bear the deep cracks of parched earth. Others look sheathed in creeping lichen. The vessels are relatively conventional in shape (spheres and extrapolations on the gourd), but after layered glazes and multiple firings, they're striking and inventive when it comes to texture and color. Silverman, who trained and previously worked as an architect, describes what he does as "creating an object or skin that holds space.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Gold Chris Cleave Simon & Schuster: 336 pp., $27 There are undoubtedly fans of Chris Cleave who will pick up his new novel, "Gold," and enjoy it as much as they did his blockbuster bestseller, "Little Bee. " There is the possibility, however, that some will find it as much of a slow-moving soap opera as I did. Which is too bad, really, for a book about two Olympic cyclists. The two women, Zoe and Kathy, are friends and rivals (heavy on the rivals). Their lives are knit together onward from the age of 19, when they first face off competitively and are taken on by the same coach, Tom. The two women have markedly different personalities.
OPINION
November 22, 2001
I want to let you know how much I appreciate the extraordinary stories and photographs from Afghanistan by Paul Watson and Carolyn Cole. Their work combines straight reporting, human interest and storytelling in a way that elevates journalism to a higher level. Each has a great eye for resonant detail, and I can only imagine the adventures they have each day as they search out and develop their stories. I especially admire Cole's photographs. They're not sensational or sentimental, just beautiful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
The San Diego Museum of Art rolled out a new, brightly painted educational tool Friday morning, a 48-foot-long semi-trailer, dubbed "Art Rig." The big rig, which will visit 107 San Diego city schools over the next two years, was parked in front of the museum next to tented hands-on art exhibits for children. The "Art Rig" is the latest element of an innovative, $3.75-million arts education program funded by philanthropist Muriel Gluck.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The notion that our unending recession is the worst since the Great Depression is now an accepted media sound bite. Yet to go by depictions in film, theater and television, the down-and-out 1970s makes our hard times look like easy street. In the muscular South Coast Repertory production of August Wilson's "Jitney," which opened Sunday in a second engagement at Pasadena Playhouse, the era that taught us the meaning of "stagflation" becomes a central character, not unlike the way it did in those classic Norman Lear sitcoms of the period.
IMAGE
February 12, 2012 | By Melissa Magsaysay, Los Angeles Times
It feels like the coldest day of the year on a January afternoon in Brooklyn. Snow is expected by evening and even the usually unflappable New Yorkers in the area are feeling the chill, clutching the collars of nylon puffer jackets closer to their chests, some ducking into a rustic, dimly lighted restaurant in the Cobble Hill neighborhood to escape the freeze. Inside, seen through the crowd of neutral tones and wool coats, sits entertainer and rising fashion It girl Solange Knowles, a definite bright spot on a frigid day. She seems to warm up the postage stamp-sized eatery with her colorful ensemble, approachable demeanor and pouf of curly hair.
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