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November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
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TRAVEL
January 11, 2004 | By Jerry V. Haines, Special to The Times
Rio de Janeiro This is a city of coexisting extremes: Wealth and opulence adjoin poverty and squalor; courtesy counterbalances crime; sensuality shares space with spirituality. The topography pulls you abruptly from sea level to cloud level and beyond, as mountains burst randomly through the cityscape. At times I felt as though I were resting in the hollow of a giant's hand whose massive fingers curled protectively upward. In fact Christ the Redeemer, Cristo Redentor, Rio's signature statue, stands with arms outstretched at the top of Corcovado Mountain, almost a half a mile high.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | By Martha Tolles, Special to The Times
My folks were going on a vacation, but they weren't planning to take me. "A dog could be a problem," Mom said. "Oh, please. " Sue threw her arms around me. "I'll take care of Brownie every minute. " Actually, I'd take care of her . I thumped my tail hopefully. So that's how I got to go in the car with my folks all the way to Montana. I loved the air, the scents, the excitement. We stayed in a motel with little cabins. Sue and I raced around in a meadow by a lake.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | By Martha Tolles, Special to The Times
My folks were going on a vacation, but they weren't planning to take me. "A dog could be a problem," Mom said. "Oh, please. " Sue threw her arms around me. "I'll take care of Brownie every minute. " Actually, I'd take care of her . I thumped my tail hopefully. So that's how I got to go in the car with my folks all the way to Montana. I loved the air, the scents, the excitement. We stayed in a motel with little cabins. Sue and I raced around in a meadow by a lake.
TRAVEL
January 11, 2004 | By Jerry V. Haines, Special to The Times
Rio de Janeiro This is a city of coexisting extremes: Wealth and opulence adjoin poverty and squalor; courtesy counterbalances crime; sensuality shares space with spirituality. The topography pulls you abruptly from sea level to cloud level and beyond, as mountains burst randomly through the cityscape. At times I felt as though I were resting in the hollow of a giant's hand whose massive fingers curled protectively upward. In fact Christ the Redeemer, Cristo Redentor, Rio's signature statue, stands with arms outstretched at the top of Corcovado Mountain, almost a half a mile high.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2002 | By Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
The year 2002 is the second-warmest in recorded history, according to NASA scientists who monitor global air temperatures. A record-breaking stretch of warmth in recent years -- with 2001 now going down as the third-warmest year on record and 1998 still holding the all-time record -- has scientists and climate experts concerned that greenhouse gases are warming the planet more quickly than previously expected. "Studying these annual temperature data, one gets the unmistakable feeling that temperature is rising and that the rise is gaining momentum," said Lester R. Brown, an economist and president of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2002 | By Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
The year 2002 is the second-warmest in recorded history, according to NASA scientists who monitor global air temperatures. A record-breaking stretch of warmth in recent years -- with 2001 now going down as the third-warmest year on record and 1998 still holding the all-time record -- has scientists and climate experts concerned that greenhouse gases are warming the planet more quickly than previously expected. "Studying these annual temperature data, one gets the unmistakable feeling that temperature is rising and that the rise is gaining momentum," said Lester R. Brown, an economist and president of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
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