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NEWS
November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | By Carol Felixson, Special to The Times
POP! POP! POPCORN! Bet you can't wait to eat some. Sorry! If you're talking about small wildflowers commonly found in the Santa Monica Mountains, you can't eat them, but you can let Chloe Chais, 10, and brother Jonathan, 7, of Beverly Hills, show you how to do an art project. They first did research on popcorn flowers, then made this illustration using tissue paper and real popcorn. Jonathan and Chloe learned there are several species of popcorn flowers. They are members of what is commonly known as the fiddleneck family of plants.
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NEWS
November 1, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
Occasionally in an NFL game, the team that plays the better football loses. In a strange 24-21 game Sunday, for example, the winners were the 6-1 Tennessee Titans, who led in the first quarter, 21-0, but scored only three additional points. I'd say the losers, the 6-1 St. Louis Rams, were the better team. In the end, after three touchdown passes by quarterback Kurt Warner, the Rams got to within a missed 38-yard field goal of overtime. For Warner, it was all a learning experience.
TRAVEL
January 11, 2004 | By Jerry V. Haines, Special to The Times
Rio de Janeiro This is a city of coexisting extremes: Wealth and opulence adjoin poverty and squalor; courtesy counterbalances crime; sensuality shares space with spirituality. The topography pulls you abruptly from sea level to cloud level and beyond, as mountains burst randomly through the cityscape. At times I felt as though I were resting in the hollow of a giant's hand whose massive fingers curled protectively upward. In fact Christ the Redeemer, Cristo Redentor, Rio's signature statue, stands with arms outstretched at the top of Corcovado Mountain, almost a half a mile high.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | By Carol Felixson, Special to The Times
POP! POP! POPCORN! Bet you can't wait to eat some. Sorry! If you're talking about small wildflowers commonly found in the Santa Monica Mountains, you can't eat them, but you can let Chloe Chais, 10, and brother Jonathan, 7, of Beverly Hills, show you how to do an art project. They first did research on popcorn flowers, then made this illustration using tissue paper and real popcorn. Jonathan and Chloe learned there are several species of popcorn flowers. They are members of what is commonly known as the fiddleneck family of plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | By Martha Tolles, Special to The Times
My folks were going on a vacation, but they weren't planning to take me. "A dog could be a problem," Mom said. "Oh, please. " Sue threw her arms around me. "I'll take care of Brownie every minute. " Actually, I'd take care of her . I thumped my tail hopefully. So that's how I got to go in the car with my folks all the way to Montana. I loved the air, the scents, the excitement. We stayed in a motel with little cabins. Sue and I raced around in a meadow by a lake.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | By Josh Meyer, Los Angeles Times
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft defended his aggressive and controversial counter-terrorism tactics in a Capitol Hill appearance Thursday but refused to support a change in law that would allow the FBI to determine if illegal immigrants and suspected terrorists have bought guns. The government's detention of more than 1,200 people--most of them illegal immigrants--in the investigation of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, its new power to monitor prison conversations between some detainees and their lawyers, and ongoing law enforcement interviews with 5,000 men--most of whom are Muslim--created few sparks during Ashcroft's highly anticipated four-hour appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2003 | By Carol Farley, Special to The Times
Carrie and Carl are twins and Laketon's youngest detectives. Today they have a new case to solve. They are in Mr. Reeder's backyard, looking at the mess that somebody made. "I just bought that birdfeeder," Mr. Reeder told them, "and just look at it now. It's broken into a dozen pieces. I know some kid wrecked the whole thing. " "Are you sure it was a kid?" Carrie asked. Frowning fiercely, the old man nodded. "And I'll bet it was Brad Levine, Nick Writz or Ron Billings!
TRAVEL
January 11, 2004 | By Jerry V. Haines, Special to The Times
Rio de Janeiro This is a city of coexisting extremes: Wealth and opulence adjoin poverty and squalor; courtesy counterbalances crime; sensuality shares space with spirituality. The topography pulls you abruptly from sea level to cloud level and beyond, as mountains burst randomly through the cityscape. At times I felt as though I were resting in the hollow of a giant's hand whose massive fingers curled protectively upward. In fact Christ the Redeemer, Cristo Redentor, Rio's signature statue, stands with arms outstretched at the top of Corcovado Mountain, almost a half a mile high.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | By Nancy Smiler Levinson, Special to The Times
July 13, 1957, Los Angeles Dear Diary, Dad and I had quite an adventure in Death Valley last week. "I'm going to photograph desert life for Look magazine, Barbara," he said to me. "How about coming along?" "Sure!" I answered. I packed T-shirts, pedal pushers, sturdy saddle shoes and a straw hat. Dad put bottles of water and lots of Nehi orange soda in the Chevy since we needed to have plenty of liquid. Then I went to the library and checked out three good books on the California desert.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2003 | By Carol Farley, Special to The Times
Carrie and Carl are twins and Laketon's youngest detectives. Today they have a new case to solve. They are in Mr. Reeder's backyard, looking at the mess that somebody made. "I just bought that birdfeeder," Mr. Reeder told them, "and just look at it now. It's broken into a dozen pieces. I know some kid wrecked the whole thing. " "Are you sure it was a kid?" Carrie asked. Frowning fiercely, the old man nodded. "And I'll bet it was Brad Levine, Nick Writz or Ron Billings!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | By Martha Tolles, Special to The Times
My folks were going on a vacation, but they weren't planning to take me. "A dog could be a problem," Mom said. "Oh, please. " Sue threw her arms around me. "I'll take care of Brownie every minute. " Actually, I'd take care of her . I thumped my tail hopefully. So that's how I got to go in the car with my folks all the way to Montana. I loved the air, the scents, the excitement. We stayed in a motel with little cabins. Sue and I raced around in a meadow by a lake.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2003 | By Nancy Smiler Levinson, Special to The Times
July 13, 1957, Los Angeles Dear Diary, Dad and I had quite an adventure in Death Valley last week. "I'm going to photograph desert life for Look magazine, Barbara," he said to me. "How about coming along?" "Sure!" I answered. I packed T-shirts, pedal pushers, sturdy saddle shoes and a straw hat. Dad put bottles of water and lots of Nehi orange soda in the Chevy since we needed to have plenty of liquid. Then I went to the library and checked out three good books on the California desert.
FOOD
July 2, 2003
  Recipe: Blueberry cream pie Total time: 1 hour, plus 4 to 6 hours final chilling time (or overnight) Servings: 8 3 egg yolks 2/3 cup plus 4 tablespoons sugar, divided 3 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch, divided 1 tablespoon flour 1/4teaspoon salt 1 1/2cups milk 1 tablespoon butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 (6-ounce) packages blueberries, divided 9-inch pie pecan shortbread crust, chilled (see below)
SCIENCE
December 12, 2002 | By Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
The year 2002 is the second-warmest in recorded history, according to NASA scientists who monitor global air temperatures. A record-breaking stretch of warmth in recent years -- with 2001 now going down as the third-warmest year on record and 1998 still holding the all-time record -- has scientists and climate experts concerned that greenhouse gases are warming the planet more quickly than previously expected. "Studying these annual temperature data, one gets the unmistakable feeling that temperature is rising and that the rise is gaining momentum," said Lester R. Brown, an economist and president of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | By Josh Meyer, Los Angeles Times
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft defended his aggressive and controversial counter-terrorism tactics in a Capitol Hill appearance Thursday but refused to support a change in law that would allow the FBI to determine if illegal immigrants and suspected terrorists have bought guns. The government's detention of more than 1,200 people--most of them illegal immigrants--in the investigation of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, its new power to monitor prison conversations between some detainees and their lawyers, and ongoing law enforcement interviews with 5,000 men--most of whom are Muslim--created few sparks during Ashcroft's highly anticipated four-hour appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
To win two of the biggest games of 1999, the Indianapolis Colts and St. Louis Rams both played similarly aggressive first-half football Sunday, repeatedly interspersing first-down passes with passing-down runs. Proving that offense-minded teams can win that way that early--in an NFL game's first 30 minutes--Indianapolis got ahead of Miami by 14 points in the second quarter, when St. Louis opened a 21-point lead on Carolina. The Rams needed a big fourth-quarter defensive play--an interception-touchdown--to hang on, 34-21, and win the NFC West title.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
To win two of the biggest games of 1999, the Indianapolis Colts and St. Louis Rams both played similarly aggressive first-half football Sunday, repeatedly interspersing first-down passes with passing-down runs. Proving that offense-minded teams can win that way that early--in an NFL game's first 30 minutes--Indianapolis got ahead of Miami by 14 points in the second quarter, when St. Louis opened a 21-point lead on Carolina. The Rams needed a big fourth-quarter defensive play--an interception-touchdown--to hang on, 34-21, and win the NFC West title.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
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