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FOOD
June 11, 2003
Total time: 45 minutes, plus 2 hours chilling Servings: 10 Note: From Douglas Keane at Market. 6 cucumbers, seeded and cut into 2-inch chunks (unpeeled) 3 avocados, peeled, pitted and cut up 2 cups plain yogurt 2 cups buttermilk 1/2cup red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon salt 6 fresh mint leaves, diced small 1. Combine the cucumbers, avocados, yogurt, buttermilk, vinegar, sugar and salt in a large bowl. Working in batches, purée in a blender until the soup is very smooth and well combined, 2 to 3 minutes each batch.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
October 3, 2005 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My doctor had me take Prelief because he thought I had interstitial cystitis. It turns out I don't. But since I started using Prelief, I have hardly had any canker sores, which I got every time I ate something acidic, like salsa or barbecue sauce. I hope you will pass this information on to other canker-sore sufferers. Prelief, or calcium glycerophosphate, is sold as a supplement to take the acid out of food. It can help people who suffer heartburn or bladder problems.
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HEALTH
October 3, 2005 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My doctor had me take Prelief because he thought I had interstitial cystitis. It turns out I don't. But since I started using Prelief, I have hardly had any canker sores, which I got every time I ate something acidic, like salsa or barbecue sauce. I hope you will pass this information on to other canker-sore sufferers. Prelief, or calcium glycerophosphate, is sold as a supplement to take the acid out of food. It can help people who suffer heartburn or bladder problems.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2005 | By Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
Bill Clinton slept here. He shopped a few blocks away. He had dinner around the corner and down the street. Everywhere I turned, it seemed, I saw fading photos of the former president smiling into the camera as he shook hands with a beaming proprietor. I could have been in Little Rock, Ark., instead of Antigua. It has been six years since Bill Clinton's visit, but his star still shines brightly in this Central American colonial city. He was the first U.S. president to visit Guatemala since Lyndon Johnson nearly 30 years earlier.
SCIENCE
December 21, 2003 | By Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
James Hallock discovered just how little it takes to bring down a space shuttle. He did it by playing with pencils. As a member of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, the pear-shaped, bewhiskered expert on flight safety had a New Englander's flinty skepticism and a physicist's distaste for untested accident theories. On this day, Hallock, 62, scowled at specifications for the reinforced carbon panels that shielded the leading edge of Columbia's wings from the heat of reentry.
WORLD
October 2, 2002
GETTING ABOARD Enrique guesses there are more than 200 migrants on board, a tiny army of them who charged out of the cemetery with nothing but their cunning. Arrayed against them are Mexican immigration authorities, or la migra , along with crooked police, street gangsters and bandits. They wage what a priest at an immigrant shelter calls "la guerra sin nombre," the war with no name. Chiapas, he says, "is a cemetery with no crosses, where people die without even getting a prayer.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
Most end-of-the millennium voters have been making what I think of as a couple of wrong calls. Contemplating the most recent 100 years: • Babe Ruth was the athlete of the century, I'd say, not Muhammad Ali. • O.J. Simpson was the football player of the century, I'm quite sure, not Jim Brown. • The negative--if that's the right word--on front-runners Ali and Brown is that, like Michael Jordan, they were specialists. Great athletes are by definition not specialists.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
Occasionally in an NFL game, the team that plays the better football loses. In a strange 24-21 game Sunday, for example, the winners were the 6-1 Tennessee Titans, who led in the first quarter, 21-0, but scored only three additional points. I'd say the losers, the 6-1 St. Louis Rams, were the better team. In the end, after three touchdown passes by quarterback Kurt Warner, the Rams got to within a missed 38-yard field goal of overtime. For Warner, it was all a learning experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2003 | By Carol Farley, Special to The Times
Carrie and Carl are twins and Laketon's youngest detectives. They were talking as they walked to the video store. "Too bad this movie has to be back this morning," Carrie said. "We didn't even get to see it. " Carl sighed. "Yeah, that power outage messed up the whole neighborhood. " "Carrie! Carl!" Ashley Matson was calling. "Someone egged our house last night during the power outage. Mom said I could only have two friends over, so I couldn't invite Kaylin, Leslie or Myra. They were kind of upset.
TRAVEL
April 3, 2005 | By Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
From Glen Canyon Bridge on U.S. Highway 89, you can see both sides of an argument. To the north is placid Lake Powell, a big, blue tropical cocktail in the arid no man's land of southeastern Utah. It's Exhibit A in the case for letting 42-year-old Glen Canyon Dam stand. To the south is the Colorado River, testily emerging from impoundment, cutting through sheer rock walls on its way to the Grand Canyon, wild and free, the way nature made it. I stood there with my brother, John, in early February, thinking about Seldom Seen Smith, the fictional mastermind of a plot to blow up the Glen Canyon Dam in Edward Abbey's 1975 novel, "The Monkey Wrench Gang.
MAGAZINE
February 6, 2005 | By Nancy Rommelmann, Nancy Rommelmann last wrote for the magazine about Microsoft's Smart Home
For centuries in America, we tended to our dead. People died at home, and relatives prepared the body, laid it out in the parlor and sat by as callers paid final respects. The body was buried in the family cemetery, if there was one, or on the back 40; pieties were spoken, and life went on until the next person died. Death, if not a welcome visitor, was a familiar one. This changed, incrementally, during the Civil War, when others were paid to undertake the job of transporting the bodies of soldiers killed far from home; this is when formaldehyde as an embalming agent was first used.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2004 | By Tracy Weber, Charles Ornstein and Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writers
On a warm July afternoon, an impish second-grader named Dunia Tasejo was running home after buying ice cream on her South Los Angeles street when a car sideswiped her. Knocked to the pavement, she screamed for help, blood pouring from her mouth. Her father bolted from the house to her side. An ambulance rushed her to the nearest hospital: Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. For Elias and Sulma Tasejo, there was no greater terror than seeing their 9-year-old daughter strapped to a gurney that day in 2000.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
Yasser Arafat, guerrilla chieftain turned statesman who juggled armed resistance and political diplomacy, yet failed to achieve his lifelong dream of creating a Palestinian state, died today. He was 75. Tayeb Abdel Rahim, a top Arafat aide, confirmed to The Associated Press that Arafat died at 4:30 am Paris time. He spoke to reporters at Arafat's headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Arafat, who had been a prisoner in his West Bank headquarters since 2002, died in a military hospital in a Paris suburb.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2004 | By Joe McElwee, Special to The Times
Winds blast the bald outcropping 1,530 feet above the Atlantic as the stars melt into the creeping light of dawn. Perched on Cadillac Mountain in America's easternmost national park, I may be the first person in the country to witness this new day. Around me, there are only the crash of the waves, the cry of a seagull and a cold, numbing wind. Acadia National Park, established in 1919 as the first national park east of the Mississippi, dangles from Maine's tortuous coastline on a land formation called Mount Desert Island.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2004 | By Margo Pfeiff, Special to The Times
"Do I believe in elves?" Sveinki repeated my question. Tap, tap, tap, he knocked the ash from his pipe on a chunk of lava. He had done this so often during our four days of hiking together that it had become a comforting soundtrack to our trip. We were leaning against our backpacks, sipping Danish coffee and eating butter cookies in the sun on the shore of a lake within Tjarnargigur crater. "I believe they are an early form of urban legend," he said slowly in the tone of the professor that he is, "or a graphic means of passing on to the next generation local dangers, like wells that have gone bad and such.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | By Carol Felixson, Special to The Times
POP! POP! POPCORN! Bet you can't wait to eat some. Sorry! If you're talking about small wildflowers commonly found in the Santa Monica Mountains, you can't eat them, but you can let Chloe Chais, 10, and brother Jonathan, 7, of Beverly Hills, show you how to do an art project. They first did research on popcorn flowers, then made this illustration using tissue paper and real popcorn. Jonathan and Chloe learned there are several species of popcorn flowers. They are members of what is commonly known as the fiddleneck family of plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | By Carol Felixson, Special to The Times
POP! POP! POPCORN! Bet you can't wait to eat some. Sorry! If you're talking about small wildflowers commonly found in the Santa Monica Mountains, you can't eat them, but you can let Chloe Chais, 10, and brother Jonathan, 7, of Beverly Hills, show you how to do an art project. They first did research on popcorn flowers, then made this illustration using tissue paper and real popcorn. Jonathan and Chloe learned there are several species of popcorn flowers. They are members of what is commonly known as the fiddleneck family of plants.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | By Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Society may not be quite ready for the day when a dead person's face is recycled for the living - but that day is coming nonetheless. Such an operation would give new life to someone severely disfigured by burns, cancer or an accident, allowing the person to exist free of the stares and shock their appearances often evoke. The procedure would be more straightforward than the many reconstructive surgeries such victims usually must endure. Already, doctors at the University of Louisville in Kentucky say they hope to soon select a candidate for the operation, possibly within the year.
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