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NEWS
April 29, 2001 | ACHRENE SICAKYUZ, Special to the Times
On June 10, the fastest long-distance train in the world--the Train a Grande Vitesse, known as the TGV--will inaugurate a new connection on France's most popular route. With the TGV, Paris will be three hours from the Mediterranean port of Marseilles, 500 miles away--cutting one hour, 20 minutes from the trip. The route goes through Provence and includes such popular tourist stops as Avignon, home to the medieval Palace of the Popes; picturesque Aix-en-Provence, where artist Paul Cezanne lived and worked; and Nimes, known for its classical Roman ruins.
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OPINION
November 20, 2012
Re “ Bullet train leg to finish later ,” Nov. 16 It has been my experience that high-speed rail has brought untold benefits wherever it has been developed. The early decision to solve Japan's transportation needs with bullet trains had many side benefits, including the development of both industrial and commercial centers that were and are major supporting elements to the success of the system. The same can be said for the TGV in France. Jobs, growth and more freedom of movement are but a few of the positive elements from this long-overdue project.
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TRAVEL
April 29, 2001 | ACHRENE SICAKYUZ, Special to the Times
On June 10, the fastest long-distance train in the world--the Train a Grande Vitesse, known as the TGV--will inaugurate a new connection on France's most popular route. With the TGV, Paris will be three hours from the Mediterranean port of Marseilles, 500 miles away--cutting one hour, 20 minutes from the trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to The Los Angeles Times
Southern California residents — and most Americans outside the Northeast corridor — can only envy the speed, comfort and ease of rail travel that the French have, especially the speedy TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse). Ina Caro celebrates this mode of travel in "Paris to the Past: Traveling Through French History by Train," as she describes a series of trips to noteworthy places that are within a few hours of the capital by rail, allowing one to explore history and the countryside by day and return to Paris for dinner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has vetoed legislation that would have required rail companies interested in working on the California high-speed train project to admit whether they transported people to concentration camps during World War II. Though he said he sympathized with the victims of Nazi death camps, the governor rejected the Holocaust Survivors Responsibility Act on Thursday night, contending it would have needlessly placed the state in...
OPINION
November 20, 2012
Re “ Bullet train leg to finish later ,” Nov. 16 It has been my experience that high-speed rail has brought untold benefits wherever it has been developed. The early decision to solve Japan's transportation needs with bullet trains had many side benefits, including the development of both industrial and commercial centers that were and are major supporting elements to the success of the system. The same can be said for the TGV in France. Jobs, growth and more freedom of movement are but a few of the positive elements from this long-overdue project.
TRAVEL
November 21, 2010 | By Mary Ellen Monahan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
THE BEST WAY TO ROQUEFORT, FRANCE Montpellier, about 74 miles away, has the largest nearby airport. From LAX, Air France offers connecting service (change of planes). Restricted round-trip fares begin at $396. By train, the fastest route is via daily TGV train from Paris (Gare de Lyon) to Montpellier, change in B���©ziers, and arrive in Millau about seven hours later. Roundtrip second-class tickets from $150; book at least a month ahead for lowest price on www.raileurope.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to The Los Angeles Times
Southern California residents — and most Americans outside the Northeast corridor — can only envy the speed, comfort and ease of rail travel that the French have, especially the speedy TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse). Ina Caro celebrates this mode of travel in "Paris to the Past: Traveling Through French History by Train," as she describes a series of trips to noteworthy places that are within a few hours of the capital by rail, allowing one to explore history and the countryside by day and return to Paris for dinner.
TRAVEL
March 22, 1987 | JEFF FREES, Frees is a Colorado Springs free-lance writer/photographer.
It's a mystery--Americans' infatuation with rental cars for touring Europe. Trains have always been and will continue to be, barring a plunge in quality, the preferred form of transportation in Europe for my wife and me. Cars add too much tension--what road to take, where to park safely overnight, how to survive race track conditions on Europe's high-speed expressways? Also, while contained within a car, you are isolated from the people you've gone 3,500 miles to see, talk to and learn about.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing through the verdant French countryside toward Rennes Saturday, Orange County Supervisor Don R. Roth got to fulfill a fantasy--announcing the blistering speed of 186 m.p.h. to several hundred passengers aboard France's TGV, the high-speed Train a Grande Vitesse. He was thrilled. "This is one of the greatest experiences of my life," Roth announced over the train's intercom.
TRAVEL
November 21, 2010 | By Mary Ellen Monahan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
THE BEST WAY TO ROQUEFORT, FRANCE Montpellier, about 74 miles away, has the largest nearby airport. From LAX, Air France offers connecting service (change of planes). Restricted round-trip fares begin at $396. By train, the fastest route is via daily TGV train from Paris (Gare de Lyon) to Montpellier, change in B���©ziers, and arrive in Millau about seven hours later. Roundtrip second-class tickets from $150; book at least a month ahead for lowest price on www.raileurope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has vetoed legislation that would have required rail companies interested in working on the California high-speed train project to admit whether they transported people to concentration camps during World War II. Though he said he sympathized with the victims of Nazi death camps, the governor rejected the Holocaust Survivors Responsibility Act on Thursday night, contending it would have needlessly placed the state in...
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | ACHRENE SICAKYUZ, Special to the Times
On June 10, the fastest long-distance train in the world--the Train a Grande Vitesse, known as the TGV--will inaugurate a new connection on France's most popular route. With the TGV, Paris will be three hours from the Mediterranean port of Marseilles, 500 miles away--cutting one hour, 20 minutes from the trip. The route goes through Provence and includes such popular tourist stops as Avignon, home to the medieval Palace of the Popes; picturesque Aix-en-Provence, where artist Paul Cezanne lived and worked; and Nimes, known for its classical Roman ruins.
TRAVEL
April 29, 2001 | ACHRENE SICAKYUZ, Special to the Times
On June 10, the fastest long-distance train in the world--the Train a Grande Vitesse, known as the TGV--will inaugurate a new connection on France's most popular route. With the TGV, Paris will be three hours from the Mediterranean port of Marseilles, 500 miles away--cutting one hour, 20 minutes from the trip.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three French workers hunched over their potent licorice-flavored pastis cocktails recently in the corner bar of a Paris suburb. They were depressed that France's top soccer team from Marseilles had lost in the European Cup final to a team from Belgrade, Yugoslavia, the night before. The mood remained glum until one of the men, Didier Debaud, 37, a moving company laborer, perked the place up with the best news of the times: "At least we sold the train to Texas."
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the celebrated French TGV high-speed train system opened its first line between Paris and Lyon nine years ago, it has been expanding full-throttle, clear-track ahead through the French countryside. The Paris-Lyon route was an instant success that cut the 290-mile travel time between the cities to two hours. Counting airport transportation and waiting times, even airlines could not compete with the new pride of French engineering.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three French workers hunched over their potent licorice-flavored pastis cocktails recently in the corner bar of a Paris suburb. They were depressed that France's top soccer team from Marseilles had lost in the European Cup final to a team from Belgrade, Yugoslavia, the night before. The mood remained glum until one of the men, Didier Debaud, 37, a moving company laborer, perked the place up with the best news of the times: "At least we sold the train to Texas."
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the celebrated French TGV high-speed train system opened its first line between Paris and Lyon nine years ago, it has been expanding full-throttle, clear-track ahead through the French countryside. The Paris-Lyon route was an instant success that cut the 290-mile travel time between the cities to two hours. Counting airport transportation and waiting times, even airlines could not compete with the new pride of French engineering.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing through the verdant French countryside toward Rennes Saturday, Orange County Supervisor Don R. Roth got to fulfill a fantasy--announcing the blistering speed of 186 m.p.h. to several hundred passengers aboard France's TGV, the high-speed Train a Grande Vitesse. He was thrilled. "This is one of the greatest experiences of my life," Roth announced over the train's intercom.
TRAVEL
March 22, 1987 | JEFF FREES, Frees is a Colorado Springs free-lance writer/photographer.
It's a mystery--Americans' infatuation with rental cars for touring Europe. Trains have always been and will continue to be, barring a plunge in quality, the preferred form of transportation in Europe for my wife and me. Cars add too much tension--what road to take, where to park safely overnight, how to survive race track conditions on Europe's high-speed expressways? Also, while contained within a car, you are isolated from the people you've gone 3,500 miles to see, talk to and learn about.
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