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NEWS
August 4, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Popular Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra narrowly held on to his post Friday as Thailand's Constitutional Court ruled 8 to 7 that he was not guilty of deliberately hiding millions of dollars in assets. In the biggest test of Thailand's strict anti-corruption law, four of the judges accepted the billionaire prime minister's defense that he made an "honest mistake" and did not purposely conceal some of his wealth.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
The U.S. State Department has issued a travel alert for Thailand, warning visitors about demonstrations sparked, in part, by elections next month. "The situation is unpredictable and ongoing demonstration activity, primarily in the greater Bangkok area and occasionally elsewhere in Thailand, is expected to continue," the alert on the State Department's website says.   “U.S. citizens are advised to avoid all protests, demonstrations and large gatherings. Some protest sites are ... near tourist attractions and popular shopping malls, which at times have closed or shortened hours unexpectedly.” Thailand on Tuesday declared a state of emergency . The demonstrations have become increasingly violent in recent days.
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WORLD
August 12, 2008 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
A former Thai leader and his wife jumped bail Monday and returned to exile in Britain, escaping prosecution on corruption charges. In a statement read on Thai television, former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra said from London that unnamed political opponents were out to get him and that he was the victim of "judicial interference." "What happened to me and my family and my close relations resulted from efforts to get rid of me from politics," Thaksin said. "These are my political enemies.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
A massive protest against the government of Thailand on Monday occupied seven key intersections in teeming Bangkok, paralyzing traffic in the city of 12 million and forcing schools and businesses to close, news agencies reported. Though the demonstrators demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra were mostly peaceful, the vows of a radical opposition segment to shut down the stock exchange and air traffic control in the tourism-dependent country stirred fears that the protests and economic disruption would escalate.
WORLD
May 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra resumed his duties full time today as opponents planned more street demonstrations and lawsuits to force his ouster. "Yes, I am coming to work full time and will chair every Cabinet meeting," he told reporters. Faced with protesters accusing him of abuse of power and corruption, Thaksin had taken a 49-day "break" from the political arena, appointing a caretaker prime minister.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The blast that destroyed a Thai Airways plane minutes before Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra was to board came from beneath his assigned seat, his security advisor said. Thaksin said it could have been an inside job to assassinate him. The Boeing 737-400 blew up and burned on the tarmac Saturday, 35 minutes before its scheduled departure from Bangkok International Airport. One crew member died and seven airline workers were injured.
WORLD
March 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of protesters demanding the prime minister's resignation marched to his office after a boisterous rally, accusing Thaksin Shinawatra of corruption and abuse of power. Leaders said the crowds would camp out in the streets until Thaksin quit. The prime minister was believed to be in northeastern Thailand. The anti-Thaksin campaign swelled last month after the premier's family sold its controlling stake in telecommunications giant Shin Corp.
WORLD
March 27, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Supporters of former leader Thaksin Shinawatra surrounded the main government office to demand the administration's dissolution, drawing tens of thousands to a boisterous rally and clearing police barricades with construction cranes. The new burst of turmoil, which plagued Thailand through most of last year, came as the government of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva grappled with the country's worst economic crisis in a decade. The demonstration by about 30,000 Thaksin loyalists started shortly after the government began handing out $55 checks to millions of low-income Thais to stimulate an export-dependent economy battered by loss of global markets.
WORLD
December 14, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Ousted leader Thaksin Shinawatra addressed tens of thousands of supporters by video from exile, warning against efforts to "interfere" in democracy as lawmakers prepared to select yet another new prime minister amid political crisis. For most of the day, the crowd, estimated by police at 30,000 to 40,000, cheered and danced as speaker after speaker accused the army of using its influence to force Thaksin's political allies from power despite their election victory a year ago. They criticized efforts by the opposition Democrat Party to form a new government as early as Monday.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
The U.S. State Department has issued a travel alert for Thailand, warning visitors about demonstrations sparked, in part, by elections next month. "The situation is unpredictable and ongoing demonstration activity, primarily in the greater Bangkok area and occasionally elsewhere in Thailand, is expected to continue," the alert on the State Department's website says.   “U.S. citizens are advised to avoid all protests, demonstrations and large gatherings. Some protest sites are ... near tourist attractions and popular shopping malls, which at times have closed or shortened hours unexpectedly.” Thailand on Tuesday declared a state of emergency . The demonstrations have become increasingly violent in recent days.
WORLD
December 8, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - After several days of relative calm in Bangkok, the main opposition party raised the stakes Sunday by resigning en masse from parliament in protest over a government they claim is illegitimate. By aligning with street protesters, the opposition Democrat party is threatening to deepen the country's political standoff. The Democrats, who have not won an election since 1992, are betting that their political fortunes will be advanced by aligning with anti-government street protesters.
NEWS
December 1, 2013 | By Simon Roughneen and Mark Magnier
BANGKOK, Thailand - Riot police fired tear gas Sunday at anti-government protesters armed with petrol bombs trying to force their way into the prime minister's complex and police headquarters, intensifying Thailand's political crisis and raising fears of extended instability in the Southeast Asian nation. For most of the last week, protests remained peaceful. But on Saturday, the seventh day of protests, clashes between pro- and anti-government supporters turned violent around Ramkhamhaeng University, with at least three people killed overnight and dozens injured, according to police.
WORLD
November 30, 2013 | By Simon Roughneen and Mark Magnier
BANGKOK, Thailand - Anti-government protests turned violent Saturday with at least one person killed in the Thai capital after opponents and supporters of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra clashed. Protests had remained relatively peaceful over the last week as the two sides essentially stayed apart during daily demonstrations. But on Saturday, opponents of Yingluck gathered near the site of a pro-government rally being held inside a stadium. Using sticks, stones and chunks of concrete, several hundred protesters, many of them students, took aim at government supporters some 50 yards away up a dark street behind Ramkhamhaeng University.
WORLD
November 29, 2013 | By Simon Roughneen and Mark Magnier
BANGKOK, Thailand -- Hundreds of demonstrators forced their way into Thailand's army headquarters Friday, the latest building targeted in anti-government protests aimed at unseating Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra. Shortly after noon, protesters breached the gate of the army compound in central Bangkok and remained inside for about two hours without entering any buildings before drifting off. Demonstrators gave speeches and were heard demanding that the army take a side in the showdown.
WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - Thailand's prime minister easily survived a no-confidence vote Thursday, but hundreds of protesters continued to besiege ministries in the capital as her embattled government sought a way out of its political crisis. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra's ruling Pheu Thai party prevailed in parliament by a vote of 297 to 134. The opposition hoped to unseat the government but members of Yingluck's party held firm in their commanding majority to blunt the challenge. Footage showed her smiling broadly dressed in a dark suit and gold necklace as the vote was announced.
WORLD
November 25, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
NEW DELHI -- Blowing whistles and calling for the prime minister to resign, anti-government demonstrators forced their way into Thailand's finance and foreign ministries Monday, joining thousands who poured into the streets of the Thai capital of Bangkok for the second day in a row. The protests were triggered by a controversial political-amnesty bill that critics say would have allowed ousted leader Thaksin Shinawatra to return to Thailand without...
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
Lawmakers formally elected telecommunications tycoon Thaksin Shinawatra as Thailand's new prime minister after his party swept last month's general elections. Thaksin, who won the vote in the lower house of parliament by a 340-127 margin, pledged to make tackling the country's economic problems his top priority. Thaksin and 29 other lawmakers abstained in the vote in the 500-seat legislature. The house speaker and two deputy speakers traditionally do not vote.
WORLD
November 25, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
NEW DELHI -- Blowing whistles and calling for the prime minister to resign, anti-government demonstrators forced their way into Thailand's finance and foreign ministries Monday, joining thousands who poured into the streets of the Thai capital of Bangkok for the second day in a row. The protests were triggered by a controversial political-amnesty bill that critics say would have allowed ousted leader Thaksin Shinawatra to return to Thailand without...
WORLD
July 4, 2011 | By Mark Magnier and Simon Roughneen
Thailand's main opposition party won a fractious election Sunday, paving the way for the nation's first female prime minister and the possible return from exile of her controversial brother, as disenfranchised voters laid down a new challenge to the nation's political establishment. Several hundred supporters mobbed party headquarters as word spread that the Puea Thai party, led by political novice Yingluck Shinawatra, 44, had secured 264 of parliament's 500 seats in preliminary results.
OPINION
March 21, 2010 | By Stanley A. Weiss
Sixty years ago this week, King Bhumibol Adulyadej arrived back in Thailand. The 22-year-old had lived abroad most of his life. Named king four years earlier on his brother's death, he was coming home for his coronation. The royal navy was drawn up for review. A jet squadron soared overhead. Half a million people lined the streets in celebration. As one biographer writes, "To astrologers, the heavens proved the great event: three days before Bhumibol arrived, hail fell on Bangkok for the first time since 1933."
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