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SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
As a drug, marijuana has certain effects and, depending on why you're taking it, some side effects. And not everyone wants the whole package. New research finds that for patients who consider weed's buzz an unwanted side effect, the answer might be as simple as taking an ibuprofen with their tetrahydrocannibinol (or THC). A study published Thursday in the journal Cell both demonstrates and explains why common anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen and the prescription analgesics indomethacin and celecoxib (marketed as Celebrex)
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SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Leave it to science to find a way to harsh the mellow of marijuana. A French research team has discovered a natural chemical brake that can tamp down the effects of THC, the main intoxicant in marijuana. They believe it could lead to ways to protect against memory loss, torpor and other side-effects better known as being stoned. “We have this built-in negative feedback mechanism, a brake” on cannabis intoxication, said University of Bordeaux neurobiologist Dr. Pier Vincenzo Piazza, principal author of a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2012 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The tech broke the bud of marijuana into small flakes, measuring 200 milligrams into a vial. He had picked up the strain, Ghost, earlier that day from a dispensary in the Valley and guessed by its pungency and visible resin glands that it was potent. He could have determined this the old-fashioned way, with a bong and a match. Instead, he began the meticulous process of preparing the sample for the high-pressure liquid chromatograph. His lab, called The Werc Shop, tests medical cannabis for levels of the psychoactive ingredient known as THC and a few dozen other compounds, as well as for contaminants like molds, bacteria and pesticides that marijuana advocates don't much like to talk about.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
As a drug, marijuana has certain effects and, depending on why you're taking it, some side effects. And not everyone wants the whole package. New research finds that for patients who consider weed's buzz an unwanted side effect, the answer might be as simple as taking an ibuprofen with their tetrahydrocannibinol (or THC). A study published Thursday in the journal Cell both demonstrates and explains why common anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen and the prescription analgesics indomethacin and celecoxib (marketed as Celebrex)
SCIENCE
May 28, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As legalized marijuana appears in an increasing number of American homes, so too does evidence of a dark side: accidental ingestion of pot and pot-infused food by young children. The results can be frightening to such children, who often suffer anxiety attacks when they start to feel unexpected symptoms of being high: hallucinations, dizziness, altered perception and impaired thinking. And the trend should prompt equal concern among adult caregivers and public health authorities, since ingestion of highly potent marijuana by young children can suppress respiration and even induce coma, according to a study published online this week in JAMA Pediatrics.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Unless there is some recognized analgesic effect of rolling a joint, lighting it up and deeply inhaling the by-products of marijuana combustion, then it stands to reason that you could distill the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, and formulate it into, say, a capsule. Doing so would combine the relief that comes with smoked marijuana with the ease of a pill and the quality control that comes with approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Poof! Up in smoke goes the debate about medical marijuana.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The words “marijuana” and “brain damage” usually go in that order in medical literature. An Israeli researcher has flipped them around, finding that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may arrest some forms of brain damage in mice. The loco weed already is favored by those who suffer from chronic diseases, not to mention fans of Cypress Hill, Bob Marley and the Grateful Dead. But pharmacologist Josef Sarne of Tel Aviv University found that a minuscule amount of tetrahydrocannabinol may protect the brain after injuries from seizures, toxic drug exposure or a lack of oxygen.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Leave it to science to find a way to harsh the mellow of marijuana. A French research team has discovered a natural chemical brake that can tamp down the effects of THC, the main intoxicant in marijuana. They believe it could lead to ways to protect against memory loss, torpor and other side-effects better known as being stoned. “We have this built-in negative feedback mechanism, a brake” on cannabis intoxication, said University of Bordeaux neurobiologist Dr. Pier Vincenzo Piazza, principal author of a study published Thursday in the journal Science.
OPINION
February 25, 2013
As states of a more liberal bent battle the federal government over the legalization of medical and even recreational marijuana, another cannabis battle has reemerged in the farm states. But if pot smoking raises troubling moral and safety questions, industrial hemp does not. Activists have been struggling to legalize hemp for decades in the U.S., but only recently has the issue seemingly caught fire in Congress. Last week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell signed on to legislation that had for years been championed by Texas Rep. Ron Paul, the former GOP presidential contender, and has now been taken up by his son Rand, the Republican senator from Kentucky.
OPINION
December 30, 2006
Re "Vendor's reefer sadness," Column One, Dec. 27 Two issues stand out. First, why have local officials not developed zoning standards for medical cannabis dispensaries? Why not locate such dispensaries in malls where there's adequate parking? Second, why aren't medical marijuana advocates and elected officials promoting a broader use of Marinol, a form of THC that can legally be prescribed by a physician? Marinol appears to be just as effective in treating some of the same conditions for which medical marijuana users are seeking treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2013 | By Veronica Rocha
State inspectors logged years of violations for incomplete children's records and unkempt conditions including a lingering odor of urine at a La Crescenta day-care facility where 2-year-old girl tested positive for an active ingredient in marijuana last week. Roubena Hartounian, director of Bina's Family Child Care, was repeatedly cited for failing to eliminate the strong odor of urine inside the facility in the 3200 block of Orange Avenue and maintaining improper equipment, according to records from the California Department of Social Services, which licenses day-care facilities.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Friday asked for changes in a medical marijuana bill to to ease access to the drug for ill children. Christie signaled that he would sign the bill if the Legislature changed it to stipulate that edible forms of marijuana would be available only to qualified minors, and that a pediatrician and psychiatrist had to approve a child's prescription. “Today, I am making common sense recommendations to this legislation to ensure sick children receive the treatment their parents prefer, while maintaining appropriate safeguards,” Christie said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | By Veronica Rocha and Jason Wells
The operator of a La Crescenta daycare center was free on bond Friday after she was arrested when a 2-year-old girl under her care was hospitalized for being under the influence of marijuana. Roubena Hartounian, 50, was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of child neglect and endangerment at her residential daycare center, Bina's Family Child Care. It was closed down after inspectors reported finding rat and mouse droppings throughout the center. There also was no power at the location.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Veronica Rocha
A La Crescenta day-care facility was shut down and its director was arrested Wednesday after a 2-year-old girl being supervising there was hospitalized for being under the influence of marijuana, police said. Roubena Hartounian, 50, was taken into custody on suspicion of child neglect and endangerment at her residential day-care center, Bina's Family Child Care, which city officials closed after they discovered it had no power and there were rat droppings scattered inside, Glendale Police Sgt. Tom Lorenz said.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The words “marijuana” and “brain damage” usually go in that order in medical literature. An Israeli researcher has flipped them around, finding that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may arrest some forms of brain damage in mice. The loco weed already is favored by those who suffer from chronic diseases, not to mention fans of Cypress Hill, Bob Marley and the Grateful Dead. But pharmacologist Josef Sarne of Tel Aviv University found that a minuscule amount of tetrahydrocannabinol may protect the brain after injuries from seizures, toxic drug exposure or a lack of oxygen.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As legalized marijuana appears in an increasing number of American homes, so too does evidence of a dark side: accidental ingestion of pot and pot-infused food by young children. The results can be frightening to such children, who often suffer anxiety attacks when they start to feel unexpected symptoms of being high: hallucinations, dizziness, altered perception and impaired thinking. And the trend should prompt equal concern among adult caregivers and public health authorities, since ingestion of highly potent marijuana by young children can suppress respiration and even induce coma, according to a study published online this week in JAMA Pediatrics.
NEWS
August 28, 1986
I am greatly concerned by the response of Pamela Cantor, the author of For Parents Only, to the mother who wrote regarding her 16-year-old daughter's use of marijuana. I agree that the mother should confront her daughter as Cantor advised (Aug. 17), but I take great exception to her gross understatement of the damage resulting from the recreational use of marijuana. Cantor stated, " . . . Marijuana is not a particularly dangerous drug. It is among the safest of commonly used drugs." Cantor is at least 15 years behind the times in her knowledge of marijuana.
HEALTH
August 18, 2008 | Jill U. Adams, Special to The Times
Medical marijuana use has a history stretching back thousands of years. In prebiblical times, the plant was used as medicinal tea in China, a stress antidote in India and a pain- reliever for earaches, childbirth and more throughout Asia, the Middle East and Africa. In recent decades, medical researchers have investigated marijuana's effects on various kinds of pain -- from damaged nerves in people with HIV, diabetes and spinal cord injury; from cancer; and from multiple sclerosis.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Unless there is some recognized analgesic effect of rolling a joint, lighting it up and deeply inhaling the by-products of marijuana combustion, then it stands to reason that you could distill the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, and formulate it into, say, a capsule. Doing so would combine the relief that comes with smoked marijuana with the ease of a pill and the quality control that comes with approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Poof! Up in smoke goes the debate about medical marijuana.
OPINION
February 25, 2013
As states of a more liberal bent battle the federal government over the legalization of medical and even recreational marijuana, another cannabis battle has reemerged in the farm states. But if pot smoking raises troubling moral and safety questions, industrial hemp does not. Activists have been struggling to legalize hemp for decades in the U.S., but only recently has the issue seemingly caught fire in Congress. Last week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell signed on to legislation that had for years been championed by Texas Rep. Ron Paul, the former GOP presidential contender, and has now been taken up by his son Rand, the Republican senator from Kentucky.
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