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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. space officials face intensifying environmental concerns about space missions, an Air Force-funded research center in El Segundo this fall will begin studying the effect of rocket launches on the Earth's fragile ozone shield. The Aerospace Corp. plans to investigate the role of solid rocket fuel combustion in the destruction of the ozone, which protects the Earth from overexposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Aerospace Corp. in El Segundo is severing employees and facing critics who want to slash its funding, Pentagon auditors have found that the company's top executives were given big pay raises. A recent confidential audit, a copy of which was obtained by The Times, showed that the company gave pay raises averaging 22% for managers and 29% for the top dozen executives in a recent two-year period. The firm has laid off 860 scientists, engineers and support staff members since 1990.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Aerospace Corp. in El Segundo is severing employees and facing critics who want to slash its funding, Pentagon auditors have found that the company's top executives were given big pay raises. A recent confidential audit, a copy of which was obtained by The Times, showed that the company gave pay raises averaging 22% for managers and 29% for the top dozen executives in a recent two-year period. The firm has laid off 860 scientists, engineers and support staff members since 1990.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Torrance Defense Firm Will Lay Off 200 Employees: Aerospace Corp., a Torrance research and development center for the Defense Department, will lay off about 200 employees at the end of January, the company announced. The cuts, resulting from defense budget cuts, amount to about 5.5% of the company's work force of 3,600 and will affect engineers as well as clerical and other administrative employees.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Torrance Defense Firm Will Lay Off 200 Employees: Aerospace Corp., a Torrance research and development center for the Defense Department, will lay off about 200 employees at the end of January, the company announced. The cuts, resulting from defense budget cuts, amount to about 5.5% of the company's work force of 3,600 and will affect engineers as well as clerical and other administrative employees.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Underscoring the continuing impact of federal defense retrenchment in Southern California, Aerospace Corp., a Torrance research and development center for the Defense Department, will lay off about 200 employees at the end of January, the company announced Friday. The cuts, resulting from defense budget cuts, amount to about 5.5% of the company's work force of 3,600 and will affect engineers as well as clerical and other administrative employees.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A confidential investigation by the Air Force inspector general has cleared the president of Aerospace Corp. and two senior Air Force officers of allegations that they improperly quashed a proposal to save $10 billion on a satellite system. The investigation followed a flurry of unusual accusations that Gen. Charles Horner, Gen.
NEWS
June 8, 1986
Stanley L. Larson of Topanga Canyon has received a 1986 Asian-Pacific American of the Year Award from the Aerospace Corp., a nonprofit company in El Segundo. Larson is head of reference services in the corporation's Lauritson Library, and he helped develop its Asian-Pacific library collection.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1986
The Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, elected James W. Plummer chairman, succeeding Robert C. Seamans Jr., who steps down from the post but who remains as a trustee. Russell E. Dougherty was named vice chairman. Elected as new trustees were: Jack L. Kerrebrock, Robert R. Shannon and Charles J. Zwick.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Underscoring the continuing impact of federal defense retrenchment in Southern California, Aerospace Corp., a Torrance research and development center for the Defense Department, will lay off about 200 employees at the end of January, the company announced Friday. The cuts, resulting from defense budget cuts, amount to about 5.5% of the company's work force of 3,600 and will affect engineers as well as clerical and other administrative employees.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A confidential investigation by the Air Force inspector general has cleared the president of Aerospace Corp. and two senior Air Force officers of allegations that they improperly quashed a proposal to save $10 billion on a satellite system. The investigation followed a flurry of unusual accusations that Gen. Charles Horner, Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. space officials face intensifying environmental concerns about space missions, an Air Force-funded research center in El Segundo this fall will begin studying the effect of rocket launches on the Earth's fragile ozone shield. The Aerospace Corp. plans to investigate the role of solid rocket fuel combustion in the destruction of the ozone, which protects the Earth from overexposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays.
REAL ESTATE
October 2, 1988
More than $10 million in construction contracts have been awarded in the first half of 1988 by aerospace firms to Auerbach Construction Inc., Santa Monica. They range from $100,000 to $4 million. The clients include General Dynamics, TRW, Northrop, Douglas Helicopters, McDonnell Douglas Aeronautics, Rockwell International, the Aerospace Corp. and various divisions of Hughes Aircraft Co. An agreement was also signed with the U.S. Deparment of Defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2001
Arthur Walker, 64, a Stanford physics professor whose work helped scientists investigate mysteries of the sun, died at his Stanford home April 29 of cancer. Using X-ray and thin-film telescopes, Walker photographed the sun's corona, or outermost atmosphere, obtaining images that were printed on the cover of the Sept. 30, 1988, Science magazine.
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