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The Athletic Congress Organization

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April 27, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Athletics Congress, sensitive about published reports that it was banning athletes for taking cold medicines, Thursday defended its drug-testing procedures. In a 1 1/2-hour conference call with members of the media, TAC officials said, in essence, athletes' ignorance of banned substances, even in common over-the-counter medicines, is not a legitimate excuse. Three world-class athletes--Larry Myricks, Greg Foster and Antonio McKay--have been suspended this year for three months.
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SPORTS
September 12, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ollan Cassell's status with The Athletics Congress will be the leading item on the agenda today in a meeting in Denver of the U.S. track and field governing body's executive committee. After hearing a report from a subcommittee formed earlier this year to evaluate Cassell, executive director for all 14 years of the organization's existence, the 22-member executive committee is expected to vote on whether to recommend to TAC's board of directors that his contract be renewed next March.
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SPORTS
September 12, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ollan Cassell's status with The Athletics Congress will be the leading item on the agenda today in a meeting in Denver of the U.S. track and field governing body's executive committee. After hearing a report from a subcommittee formed earlier this year to evaluate Cassell, executive director for all 14 years of the organization's existence, the 22-member executive committee is expected to vote on whether to recommend to TAC's board of directors that his contract be renewed next March.
SPORTS
September 30, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Saying there is "general concern of the athletes about the integrity of the sport of track and field," the Athletes Advisory Committee of The Athletics Congress held an emergency meeting in suburban Washington and Friday released a position paper that called for an independent investigation of the drug problem in U.S. track and field. The meeting was prompted by recent allegations by sprinter Darrell Robinson that some top American athletes have used performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
April 21, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Athletics Congress drug net widened Friday night as Larry Myricks, the 34-year-old world class long jumper, was suspended for three months, April 13-July 13, for taking Alka-Seltzer Cold Plus. The action follows by one day the suspension of hurdler Greg Foster for the same offense. Myricks tested positive at the TAC indoor championships Feb. 23 in New York. He told TAC officials that he was taking the medication to combat flu symptoms he says persist.
SPORTS
March 25, 1988
In response to track star Willie Banks' allegations in Wednesday's editions of The Times that The Athletics Congress might rig his drug test at the Olympic trials, TAC said Thursday in Indianapolis that it would ask Banks to produce evidence of drug-test rigging. Banks, the world record-holder in the triple jump and a vice president of TAC, had said: "There's a distinct possibility that TAC could rig the drug testing, even though I've never even thought of taking drugs."
SPORTS
September 27, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Emerging from amid the tumult a week after allegations of drug use among top U.S. athletes, there is this one simple update: Everyone involved is exploring legal options. A week ago, Stern, a West German news magazine, published an article in which a 400-meter runner identified several U.S. athletes as having bought or used banned performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
April 27, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Athletics Congress, sensitive about published reports that it was banning athletes for taking cold medicines, Thursday defended its drug-testing procedures. In a 1 1/2-hour conference call with members of the media, TAC officials said, in essence, athletes' ignorance of banned substances, even in common over-the-counter medicines, is not a legitimate excuse. Three world-class athletes--Larry Myricks, Greg Foster and Antonio McKay--have been suspended this year for three months.
SPORTS
April 21, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Athletics Congress drug net widened Friday night as Larry Myricks, the 34-year-old world class long jumper, was suspended for three months, April 13-July 13, for taking Alka-Seltzer Cold Plus. The action follows by one day the suspension of hurdler Greg Foster for the same offense. Myricks tested positive at the TAC indoor championships Feb. 23 in New York. He told TAC officials that he was taking the medication to combat flu symptoms he says persist.
SPORTS
September 30, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Saying there is "general concern of the athletes about the integrity of the sport of track and field," the Athletes Advisory Committee of The Athletics Congress held an emergency meeting in suburban Washington and Friday released a position paper that called for an independent investigation of the drug problem in U.S. track and field. The meeting was prompted by recent allegations by sprinter Darrell Robinson that some top American athletes have used performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
September 27, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Emerging from amid the tumult a week after allegations of drug use among top U.S. athletes, there is this one simple update: Everyone involved is exploring legal options. A week ago, Stern, a West German news magazine, published an article in which a 400-meter runner identified several U.S. athletes as having bought or used banned performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
March 25, 1988
In response to track star Willie Banks' allegations in Wednesday's editions of The Times that The Athletics Congress might rig his drug test at the Olympic trials, TAC said Thursday in Indianapolis that it would ask Banks to produce evidence of drug-test rigging. Banks, the world record-holder in the triple jump and a vice president of TAC, had said: "There's a distinct possibility that TAC could rig the drug testing, even though I've never even thought of taking drugs."
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