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The Colbert Report Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2007 | Matea Gold
Call it life imitating art -- imitating life. Comedy Central star Stephen Colbert, who patterned much of his on-air alter ego on outspoken cable pundits such as Bill O'Reilly, is going to come face to face with his muse next week when he and O'Reilly visit each other's shows. On Jan. 18, Colbert is set to appear on Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor." Later that night, O'Reilly will be a guest on "The Colbert Report."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2010 | By Meg James
Hulu is losing two of its biggest stars. Comedy Central is yanking "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" and "The Colbert Report" off the popular video website after the companies could not agree on a plan to share advertising revenue. Hulu said Tuesday that the shows will go off the site after March 9. Viewers still will be able to get their Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert fix free -- on thedailyshow.com and colbertnation.com, websites owned by Comedy Central parent Viacom Inc. The move throws a wrench into Hulu's ambitions to become an online showcase of top programs from all networks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
AS the fake senior correspondent on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart," Stephen Colbert earned a following mocking pompous reporters and the people they interview. His easy assumptions and grave, sometimes lewd questions were delivered deadpan with cocked head and arched eyebrow. Interviewees were often visibly confused, hanging speechless on their own desire to appear important. That was fun. But actually, the comedian said, "I much prefer being the idiot myself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
When Stephen Colbert got a buzz cut from Gen. Raymond Odierno this week it was both the least and the most important moment in his four-night sojourn in Iraq. The Comedy Central star gave up a thick head of hair, and shelved his beloved blow-dryer. America won't soon forget the shtick -- Colbert forcibly shorn by the big, bald-headed general on "order" of the commander in chief, who beamed in via satellite TV to Camp Victory in Baghdad. That scored lots of laughs and something more.
NEWS
November 3, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
COMEDY Central's move to extend its late-night franchise appears to be working -- at least based on early results. After its first two weeks on Comedy Central, Stephen Colbert's mock interview show, "The Colbert Report," has received an extended one-year contract from its initial eight-week run. Airing at 11:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, "The Colbert Report" follows "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" and currently averages 1.2 million viewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
When Stephen Colbert got a buzz cut from Gen. Raymond Odierno this week it was both the least and the most important moment in his four-night sojourn in Iraq. The Comedy Central star gave up a thick head of hair, and shelved his beloved blow-dryer. America won't soon forget the shtick -- Colbert forcibly shorn by the big, bald-headed general on "order" of the commander in chief, who beamed in via satellite TV to Camp Victory in Baghdad. That scored lots of laughs and something more.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Activist groups dropped a federal lawsuit against Viacom Inc. on Monday after the parent of Comedy Central acknowledged it made a mistake in asking YouTube to yank a parody of the cable network's "The Colbert Report." Although the video in question contained clips taken from the television show, the groups argued that their use was protected under "fair use" provisions of copyright law, and thus Viacom shouldn't have asked YouTube to remove the item.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Former FEMA director Michael D. Brown is tired of being caricatured as an incompetent federal appointee who stood by idly while the Gulf Coast was devastated by Hurricane Katrina. During an appearance before a Senate committee last month, he refused to accept all the blame for the government's slow response, insisting that he had warned the White House of the storm's disastrous potential. Now he's embarking on the next step of his rehabilitation tour: He's going on "The Colbert Report."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Colbert strode up to the green marble security desk in the lobby of News Corp.'s Manhattan headquarters, where in minutes he would face off with Fox News host Bill O'Reilly, the muse for the strident, preening cable pundit he plays on Comedy Central. Suddenly Colbert realized he had forgotten something. "Uh-oh, I don't have an ID," he said with chagrin to the skeptical woman behind the desk. No worries.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2010 | By Meg James
Hulu is losing two of its biggest stars. Comedy Central is yanking "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" and "The Colbert Report" off the popular video website after the companies could not agree on a plan to share advertising revenue. Hulu said Tuesday that the shows will go off the site after March 9. Viewers still will be able to get their Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert fix free -- on thedailyshow.com and colbertnation.com, websites owned by Comedy Central parent Viacom Inc. The move throws a wrench into Hulu's ambitions to become an online showcase of top programs from all networks.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Activist groups dropped a federal lawsuit against Viacom Inc. on Monday after the parent of Comedy Central acknowledged it made a mistake in asking YouTube to yank a parody of the cable network's "The Colbert Report." Although the video in question contained clips taken from the television show, the groups argued that their use was protected under "fair use" provisions of copyright law, and thus Viacom shouldn't have asked YouTube to remove the item.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Colbert strode up to the green marble security desk in the lobby of News Corp.'s Manhattan headquarters, where in minutes he would face off with Fox News host Bill O'Reilly, the muse for the strident, preening cable pundit he plays on Comedy Central. Suddenly Colbert realized he had forgotten something. "Uh-oh, I don't have an ID," he said with chagrin to the skeptical woman behind the desk. No worries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2007 | Matea Gold
Call it life imitating art -- imitating life. Comedy Central star Stephen Colbert, who patterned much of his on-air alter ego on outspoken cable pundits such as Bill O'Reilly, is going to come face to face with his muse next week when he and O'Reilly visit each other's shows. On Jan. 18, Colbert is set to appear on Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor." Later that night, O'Reilly will be a guest on "The Colbert Report."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Former FEMA director Michael D. Brown is tired of being caricatured as an incompetent federal appointee who stood by idly while the Gulf Coast was devastated by Hurricane Katrina. During an appearance before a Senate committee last month, he refused to accept all the blame for the government's slow response, insisting that he had warned the White House of the storm's disastrous potential. Now he's embarking on the next step of his rehabilitation tour: He's going on "The Colbert Report."
NEWS
November 3, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
COMEDY Central's move to extend its late-night franchise appears to be working -- at least based on early results. After its first two weeks on Comedy Central, Stephen Colbert's mock interview show, "The Colbert Report," has received an extended one-year contract from its initial eight-week run. Airing at 11:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, "The Colbert Report" follows "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" and currently averages 1.2 million viewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
AS the fake senior correspondent on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart," Stephen Colbert earned a following mocking pompous reporters and the people they interview. His easy assumptions and grave, sometimes lewd questions were delivered deadpan with cocked head and arched eyebrow. Interviewees were often visibly confused, hanging speechless on their own desire to appear important. That was fun. But actually, the comedian said, "I much prefer being the idiot myself.
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