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The Fisher King Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990 | DAVID MORGAN
"This little idea came up: I was watching rush-hour traffic in Grand Central and I thought, 'Wouldn't it be great if all these people suddenly started waltzing?' I really said it as a joke, and everybody thought it was wonderful. They said, 'No, no, we gotta do it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA
"There are two verbs which describe what we had to deal with on this script," says Lynda Obst, one of the producers of "The Fisher King." " 'To Disney-fy" and "to Gilliamize.' " That's what Obst and her producing partner, Debra Hill, faced in turning "The Fisher King"--the story of a radio shock jock (Jeff Bridges) who finds redemption through a homeless person (Robin Williams)--from what was initially perceived as a small independent feature into one of TriStar Pictures' major fall releases.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Terry Gilliam isn't literally shaking in his boots--or, to be more precise, his leather shoes and regulation green Fred Flintstone socks--but he's doing a fine job of at least feigning a case of professional nerves over the critical reaction to his new film. "It scares the . . . out of me," admits the Monty Pythonite turned directorial iconoclast, normally famous for giggling in the face of frightening adversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1991 | DAVID WALLACE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Fisher King," Mercedes Ruehl, playing Jeff Bridges' girlfriend, turns in a critically acclaimed, bravura performance that runs from high, bantering comedy to an intense projection of pain and sorrow. Such versatility seems expected from Ruehl these days--she won this year's Tony Award for best actress in a drama for her performance of the emotionally repressed middle-aged daughter in Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1991 | DAVID WALLACE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Fisher King," Mercedes Ruehl, playing Jeff Bridges' girlfriend, turns in a critically acclaimed, bravura performance that runs from high, bantering comedy to an intense projection of pain and sorrow. Such versatility seems expected from Ruehl these days--she won this year's Tony Award for best actress in a drama for her performance of the emotionally repressed middle-aged daughter in Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1990 Oscar show is still two weeks away, but Tri-Star Pictures has already started a campaign for next year. Anticipating both hot summer competition and the short memories of Oscar voters, Tri-Star announced on Thursday that it is pushing back its release of Terry Gilliam's "The Fisher King," a comedy-drama starring Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges, from May 10 to Sept. 27.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA
"There are two verbs which describe what we had to deal with on this script," says Lynda Obst, one of the producers of "The Fisher King." " 'To Disney-fy" and "to Gilliamize.' " That's what Obst and her producing partner, Debra Hill, faced in turning "The Fisher King"--the story of a radio shock jock (Jeff Bridges) who finds redemption through a homeless person (Robin Williams)--from what was initially perceived as a small independent feature into one of TriStar Pictures' major fall releases.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Bugsy," the story of the flamboyant mobster Benjamin (Bugsy) Siegel, who dazzled Hollywood in the '40s and was instrumental in creating the Las Vegas Strip, was voted best picture of the year by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. on Saturday. In the first of the major awards by film critics to be presented for the year's movies, the Los Angeles group also honored "Bugsy" with two other awards, Barry Levinson for his direction and James Toback for his screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Terry Gilliam isn't literally shaking in his boots--or, to be more precise, his leather shoes and regulation green Fred Flintstone socks--but he's doing a fine job of at least feigning a case of professional nerves over the critical reaction to his new film. "It scares the . . . out of me," admits the Monty Pythonite turned directorial iconoclast, normally famous for giggling in the face of frightening adversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1990 Oscar show is still two weeks away, but Tri-Star Pictures has already started a campaign for next year. Anticipating both hot summer competition and the short memories of Oscar voters, Tri-Star announced on Thursday that it is pushing back its release of Terry Gilliam's "The Fisher King," a comedy-drama starring Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges, from May 10 to Sept. 27.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990 | DAVID MORGAN
"This little idea came up: I was watching rush-hour traffic in Grand Central and I thought, 'Wouldn't it be great if all these people suddenly started waltzing?' I really said it as a joke, and everybody thought it was wonderful. They said, 'No, no, we gotta do it."
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