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BUSINESS
July 29, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
A half-completed prison in Iraq that cost $40 million marked the biggest reconstruction failure identified to date by a U.S. government watchdog, which on Monday laid responsibility for the project with a Pasadena contractor. The company, Parsons Corp., said the project was too dangerous to finish.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
A half-completed prison in Iraq that cost $40 million marked the biggest reconstruction failure identified to date by a U.S. government watchdog, which on Monday laid responsibility for the project with a Pasadena contractor. The company, Parsons Corp., said the project was too dangerous to finish.
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BUSINESS
November 23, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
William E. Leonhard will retire as chairman and chief executive of Parsons Corp. on May 15 after 24 years with the Pasadena-based engineering and construction firm, it was announced Wednesday. Leonhard, who will be 75 next month, said he has accomplished all his objectives at the firm, adding, "I feel good at this moment contemplating retirement and handing the reins to younger hands to take the company into the 21st Century." Leonhard joined Ralph M. Parsons, now a unit of Parsons Corp.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2003 | James Flanigan
War may be hell, but its aftermath can be plenty lucrative. Just ask Pasadena-based Parsons Corp. The engineering and design firm is rebuilding roads, schools and hospitals in Bosnia and Kosovo. It is dismantling chemical weapons plants and SS-20 missile delivery systems in Russia. And it has its eye on Iraq, eager to help resurrect that country's infrastructure after Saddam Hussein's regime leaves power -- by one means or another. In fact, Parsons could be among the first U.S.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, where billions of dollars in contracts are parceled out, the influence of political contributions is an ever-present undercurrent. Lobbyists--more of them are registered at the MTA than at the state Capitol--blanket the agency's meetings. And, records show, companies that do business with the MTA have donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to a handful of elected officials who oversee the nation's most expensive subway project.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge on Monday dismissed a class-action suit filed against Parsons Corp. by a group of disgruntled employees challenging the 1985 employee buyout of the Pasadena-based engineering and construction company. After a five-day trial, U.S. District Judge Robert J.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parsons Receives Saudi Contract: The Pasadena-based company confirmed that it has signed a project management contract with Saudi Arabia's Aramco oil company to oversee development of the country's Shayba oil field. Parsons Corp. will handle design of roads and other infrastructure. The company will also prepare bid packages for such things as procurement, engineering and construction work on the $2.5-billion project. The value of the contract was not disclosed.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parsons Unit Named to Work on New Airport: Parsons Corp. said a group led by its Parsons Overseas unit and Korea Power Engineering Co. was awarded a contract to work on construction of the $8-billion New Seoul International Airport in South Korea. The contract calls for Parsons, Korea Power and a consortium of other firms to provide services including design review, project controls, construction management, quality control, safety and start-up assistance.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pasadena Firm Awarded Water-Treatment Contract: Ralph M. Parsons Co. will perform final design assistance on the Metropolitan Water District's Oxidation Retrofit Program. The $200-million project will retrofit two of MWD's water-treatment facilities with a preozonation process, which uses ozone instead of chlorine to disinfect drinking water. This process is said to result in cleaner drinking water with significantly fewer disinfection byproducts.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From offices in Saudi Arabia, Washington and Pasadena, Parsons Corp. has won engineering contracts worth billions of dollars from governments in the Mideast. Now, as the risk of doing business there has become painfully apparent, the company is engaged in a frustrating bid to monitor the safety of its employees trapped in Iraqi-occupied Kuwait and to gain their release. Parsons, like other U.S. firms with Kuwaiti operations, is finding that it can do little.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pasadena Firm Awarded Water-Treatment Contract: Ralph M. Parsons Co. will perform final design assistance on the Metropolitan Water District's Oxidation Retrofit Program. The $200-million project will retrofit two of MWD's water-treatment facilities with a preozonation process, which uses ozone instead of chlorine to disinfect drinking water. This process is said to result in cleaner drinking water with significantly fewer disinfection byproducts.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parsons Receives Saudi Contract: The Pasadena-based company confirmed that it has signed a project management contract with Saudi Arabia's Aramco oil company to oversee development of the country's Shayba oil field. Parsons Corp. will handle design of roads and other infrastructure. The company will also prepare bid packages for such things as procurement, engineering and construction work on the $2.5-billion project. The value of the contract was not disclosed.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Parsons Unit Named to Work on New Airport: Parsons Corp. said a group led by its Parsons Overseas unit and Korea Power Engineering Co. was awarded a contract to work on construction of the $8-billion New Seoul International Airport in South Korea. The contract calls for Parsons, Korea Power and a consortium of other firms to provide services including design review, project controls, construction management, quality control, safety and start-up assistance.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, where billions of dollars in contracts are parceled out, the influence of political contributions is an ever-present undercurrent. Lobbyists--more of them are registered at the MTA than at the state Capitol--blanket the agency's meetings. And, records show, companies that do business with the MTA have donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to a handful of elected officials who oversee the nation's most expensive subway project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assigning of blame for construction problems that have shut down subway excavation in Hollywood intensified Thursday, as the firm paid to inspect the work accused the tunneling contractor of deliberately hiding defective work. The allegation was leveled by an official representing the inspection firm Parsons-Dillingham, which itself is under fire for its role in not catching substandard construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday afternoon at the Los Angeles Public Library in Downtown has become a happy tableau of families pushing strollers through soaring rotundas, teen-agers playing computer games at handsome wooden carrels, and children reading books under panoramic murals.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several U.S. companies with a presence in Saudi Arabia reported Tuesday that they were staying in close touch with the State Department and had not yet decided to evacuate their employees after American troops were ordered into the Middle Eastern kingdom. Fluor Corp., a construction and engineering firm based in Irvine, has no immediate plans to curtail operations or evacuate its 100 employees from Saudi Arabia, said spokesman Rick Maslin.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
With costly delays and construction woes plaguing the $310-million John Wayne Airport expansion, county officials and others are questioning the job of a little-known firm being paid $23 million to oversee the work. Several officials say the firm failed to accomplish its primary task--to keep the project on time and within budget. And controversial airport contractor Taylor Woodrow Construction California Ltd. blames it for an array of simmering problems.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER
Thomas L. Langford has been named president of Parsons Corp. Langford, 50, replaces Ray W. Judson, who turns 65 this month and plans to leave the post on Oct. 1. When Judson steps down as president, he will continue to serve as special assistant to Leonard J. Pieroni, Parsons' chairman and chief executive. Langford, who came to Parsons from the New York-based accounting firm Price Waterhouse, previously was Parsons' executive vice president and comptroller.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From offices in Saudi Arabia, Washington and Pasadena, Parsons Corp. has won engineering contracts worth billions of dollars from governments in the Mideast. Now, as the risk of doing business there has become painfully apparent, the company is engaged in a frustrating bid to monitor the safety of its employees trapped in Iraqi-occupied Kuwait and to gain their release. Parsons, like other U.S. firms with Kuwaiti operations, is finding that it can do little.
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