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The Parsons Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two top officials of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Friday sharply criticized the firm that is managing construction of the Los Angeles subway, saying a recent company brochure regarding problems in the tunnels is misleading. The brochure, with a cover photograph of the MTA's logo, was published by the Parsons Corp. and distributed last week to government officials throughout the region. The 19-page pamphlet discusses tunnel construction defects that have prompted investigations.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
A half-completed prison in Iraq that cost $40 million marked the biggest reconstruction failure identified to date by a U.S. government watchdog, which on Monday laid responsibility for the project with a Pasadena contractor. The company, Parsons Corp., said the project was too dangerous to finish.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ and JOHN L. MITCHELL and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Parsons Corp., a global provider of engineering and construction services that specializes in helping strife-torn nations rebuild, itself had to quickly regroup Wednesday after learning that its top executive, Leonard J. Pieroni, was among those presumed dead in the crash of an Air Force plane in the Balkans. Pieroni, 57, was among several executives traveling with U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown when their airplane crashed on a hillside in Croatia, the company said.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2008 | From the Washington Post
The U.S. government paid Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based contractor, $142 million to build prisons, fire stations and police facilities in Iraq that it never built or finished, according to audits by a watchdog office. The Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction said Parsons completed about one-third of its projects, which also included courthouses and border control stations. The inspector general's office is expected to release two detailed audits today evaluating Parsons' work.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based engineering and construction company, said it had bought 3D/International, a Houston-based company that specializes in designing and constructing schools and public buildings. "We had been looking for an entity that could fill out our skills and resources" in the educational world, said Charles Harrington, president of Parsons Commercial Technology Group, a unit with about 2,500 workers. The transaction was announced late Thursday. The price was not disclosed.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
A half-completed prison in Iraq that cost $40 million marked the biggest reconstruction failure identified to date by a U.S. government watchdog, which on Monday laid responsibility for the project with a Pasadena contractor. The company, Parsons Corp., said the project was too dangerous to finish.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
William E. Leonhard will retire as chairman and chief executive of Parsons Corp. on May 15 after 24 years with the Pasadena-based engineering and construction firm, it was announced Wednesday. Leonhard, who will be 75 next month, said he has accomplished all his objectives at the firm, adding, "I feel good at this moment contemplating retirement and handing the reins to younger hands to take the company into the 21st Century." Leonhard joined Ralph M. Parsons, now a unit of Parsons Corp.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, where billions of dollars in contracts are parceled out, the influence of political contributions is an ever-present undercurrent. Lobbyists--more of them are registered at the MTA than at the state Capitol--blanket the agency's meetings. And, records show, companies that do business with the MTA have donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to a handful of elected officials who oversee the nation's most expensive subway project.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge on Monday dismissed a class-action suit filed against Parsons Corp. by a group of disgruntled employees challenging the 1985 employee buyout of the Pasadena-based engineering and construction company. After a five-day trial, U.S. District Judge Robert J.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
A special inspector general said Thursday that he planned to review all of the Iraq building projects overseen by Pasadena's Parsons Corp. in the wake of severe plumbing problems that have surfaced at Baghdad's new police academy.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Parsons Corp., the top U.S. construction contractor in Iraq, could be barred from government work if the company doesn't show it has stringent safeguards against committing fraud and abuse, the Army said. Robert Kittel, the Army official in charge of contractor suspensions and debarments, sent a "show cause" letter to Parsons Chief Executive James McNulty demanding information in 10 categories of company management. The U.S.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
A special inspector general said Thursday that he planned to review all of the Iraq building projects overseen by Pasadena's Parsons Corp. in the wake of severe plumbing problems that have surfaced at Baghdad's new police academy.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2006 | David Colker
Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based engineering and construction company, promoted Chief Financial Officer Curtis Bower to the new position of vice chairman. In that role he'll oversee the company's finance, investment and corporate governance initiatives, according to Chief Executive James McNulty. Bower has been with Parsons since 1991. Charles Harrington, who was president of the company's commercial technology division, was named the new CFO. * David Colker
BUSINESS
June 10, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based engineering and construction company, said it had bought 3D/International, a Houston-based company that specializes in designing and constructing schools and public buildings. "We had been looking for an entity that could fill out our skills and resources" in the educational world, said Charles Harrington, president of Parsons Commercial Technology Group, a unit with about 2,500 workers. The transaction was announced late Thursday. The price was not disclosed.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2006 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
Parsons Corp., the Pasadena engineering firm that won one of the largest rebuilding contracts in postwar Iraq, fell dramatically short of a number of goals, according to interviews and documents that cite shoddy work and negligent government oversight. The firm was to have rebuilt Iraq's health and security infrastructure. However, an audit and interviews show it will finish only 20 of 150 planned health clinics, and nearly $70 million of medical equipment meant for the clinics sits unused.
WORLD
March 24, 2005 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
BAGHDAD -- To get ready for their next construction project, a group of engineers gathered first in a bland corporate classroom back home in Pasadena. They learned how to stop the bleeding from a bullet wound. They got tips on avoiding abduction. They struggled to fit bulletproof vests over middle-age paunches. Their task: Help rebuild Iraq. "Security is the most important thing there," said the grim-faced instructor, a former Army Ranger. "If you don't have security, nothing else happens."
NATIONAL
July 28, 2008 | From the Washington Post
The U.S. government paid Parsons Corp., a Pasadena-based contractor, $142 million to build prisons, fire stations and police facilities in Iraq that it never built or finished, according to audits by a watchdog office. The Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction said Parsons completed about one-third of its projects, which also included courthouses and border control stations. The inspector general's office is expected to release two detailed audits today evaluating Parsons' work.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | David Streitfeld and Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writers
The entrance to Bechtel Group Inc. headquarters here is defended by metal crowd barriers and protected by security guards. Even the adjoining plaza, an oasis for harried office workers in benign times, is off-limits. Bechtel, the largest construction firm in the country and the best known, became a flashpoint for protesters in the first days of the Iraq war. Demonstrators accused privately held Bechtel, which was bidding to rebuild post-conflict Iraq, of war profiteering and worse.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2004 | From Reuters
Parsons Corp. of Pasadena won a $500-million U.S. military contract Thursday to renovate buildings in Iraq. The Pentagon said the latest deal was to provide design and building services and to renovate existing public buildings, hospitals, medical clinics and housing throughout Iraq. Privately owned Parsons is one of the most active U.S. companies in Iraq. "Parsons is delighted to continue working with the U.S. government to assist the people of Iraq.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland
Pasadena-based Parsons Corp. won an $89-million contract from the Army Engineering and Support Center to manage the disposition of captured weapons and ammunition in Iraq. The construction and engineering firm said Friday that it would manage other contractors at three sites in Iraq but would have no direct role in the movement or destruction of the ordnance. According to a company statement, the subcontractors will collect munitions captured by U.S.
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