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The Wolfman

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010
CAST: Benicio Del Toro, Anthony Hopkins and Emily Blunt. Directed by Joe Johnston. BACK STORY: "It's a monster movie with a great story," says director Johnston of the film. "It's got all the gore and the action and terrifying moments, but it also has these relationships that will make it appeal to a much broader audience than just the fanboys." The film, inspired by the original 1940s production, stars Del Toro as Lawrence Talbot, a nobleman who notices frightening changes within himself while on a quest to find his brother, who has vanished.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alice in Wonderland Walt Disney, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99/$44.99 Give Tim Burton credit: When asked by Disney to make a live-action, 3-D version of "Alice in Wonderland," he didn't take the safe route. With the help of screenwriter Linda Woolverton and skilled computer-animators, Burton reinvents Lewis Carroll's creation as the story of a young woman (played by Mia Wasikowska) who returns to the surreal land she dreamed of as a girl and gets involved in an epic battle between queens.
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NEWS
October 31, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
The Wolfman is mad. And he says to Alan Cranston, "I'm gonna getcha." It all started when Robert Shrum and David Doak, who make TV commercials for Democratic Sen. Cranston's reelection campaign, were looking for one more ad to draw attention to the inconsistent stands that Cranston's Republican opponent, Rep. Ed Zschau, has taken on some issues. Why not "Ed Zschau's greatest flip-flops?" they mused as they brainstormed late one night in Washington.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
On Valentine's Day weekend, moviegoers are set to fall in love with an underdog on what's expected to be a packed weekend at theaters. Romantic comedy "Valentine's Day," from Warner Bros.' New Line Cinema unit, will almost certainly sell more tickets in the U.S. and Canada than Universal Pictures' and 20th Century Fox's bigger-budget event films "The Wolfman" and "Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief." The big question for the weekend, distribution executives at several studios agreed, is whether all three films can comfortably coexist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher >>>
Forget silver bullets, blooming wolf's bane and full-moon fever -- the real curse of "The Wolfman" was all the hard luck that the Universal Pictures release had to claw through to reach the screen Friday. The old-school monster revival, which stars Benicio Del Toro and Anthony Hopkins, arrives after enduring a late change in director, three release-date postponements and a major reworking in the edit bay. The strange thing, though, at least according to director Joe Johnston, is that somehow the film underwent a startling metamorphosis in the final cut. "I think it's turned into a film that is much, much better than the studio or probably anyone else expected," the filmmaker said while sitting down for lunch at a Beverly Hills hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Alice in Wonderland Walt Disney, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99/$44.99 Give Tim Burton credit: When asked by Disney to make a live-action, 3-D version of "Alice in Wonderland," he didn't take the safe route. With the help of screenwriter Linda Woolverton and skilled computer-animators, Burton reinvents Lewis Carroll's creation as the story of a young woman (played by Mia Wasikowska) who returns to the surreal land she dreamed of as a girl and gets involved in an epic battle between queens.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
On Valentine's Day weekend, moviegoers are set to fall in love with an underdog on what's expected to be a packed weekend at theaters. Romantic comedy "Valentine's Day," from Warner Bros.' New Line Cinema unit, will almost certainly sell more tickets in the U.S. and Canada than Universal Pictures' and 20th Century Fox's bigger-budget event films "The Wolfman" and "Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief." The big question for the weekend, distribution executives at several studios agreed, is whether all three films can comfortably coexist.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK, Anne C. Roark is a a Times staff writer who reports on science and medicine.
THE FIRST THINGS PEOPLE NOTICED WHEN THEY saw James Jones were his menacing walk, his thick, dirty beard, his long mane of black hair--and his teeth. The front teeth, on top and bottom, were missing altogether, and next to the gaping holes were canine teeth that protruded from his mouth, almost like fangs. When he was sitting on a bus reading the Bible or swaggering down a street muttering to himself, people either stared or turned away. A few of them called him names.
SPORTS
January 21, 1986 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Fans at the San Diego Sports Arena used to cheer wildly when former Socker defender Eric Geyer, known hereabouts as "The Wolfman," mixed it up with opposing players against the sideboards. That was when Geyer was commiting fouls, not calling them. He is now a referee, wearing a whistle instead of dreading the sound of one. And those cheers have turned to boos. In San Diego's recent home exhibition game against Schalke 04, Geyer was booed for calling a foul against Socker forward Steve Zungul.
SPORTS
February 22, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Welcome to this rite and ritual of an American spring, breaking in a new glove. As with anything in baseball, there are 100 views on the proper way to do this, all argued passionately. Glove gurus, some more guru than others, recommend treating a stiff new glove as either your best friend or roadkill. You can drown a glove, you can bake it, you can run it over with the car. Breaking in a baseball glove isn't science so much as a form of testosterone-fueled witchcraft. Tony Pena, former major league backstop and current New York Yankees bench coach, reportedly goes ape on a new catcher's glove, turning it inside out, outside in, punching, prodding, mugging it into submission — it's almost hard to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2010 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
Here's the surprise of the new incarnation of "The Wolfman," starring Benicio Del Toro -- there isn't one. No bite either, or humor, or camp. And the real killer . . . almost no spine-tingling dread. So I guess this is a kind of a horror story after all. Also starring, and squandering, the talents of Anthony Hopkins, Emily Blunt and Hugo Weaving, the film is built around the ancient myth of the cursed creature -- part man, part wolf, part of the time -- who battles to control the monster he discovers inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher >>>
Forget silver bullets, blooming wolf's bane and full-moon fever -- the real curse of "The Wolfman" was all the hard luck that the Universal Pictures release had to claw through to reach the screen Friday. The old-school monster revival, which stars Benicio Del Toro and Anthony Hopkins, arrives after enduring a late change in director, three release-date postponements and a major reworking in the edit bay. The strange thing, though, at least according to director Joe Johnston, is that somehow the film underwent a startling metamorphosis in the final cut. "I think it's turned into a film that is much, much better than the studio or probably anyone else expected," the filmmaker said while sitting down for lunch at a Beverly Hills hotel.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK, Anne C. Roark is a a Times staff writer who reports on science and medicine.
THE FIRST THINGS PEOPLE NOTICED WHEN THEY saw James Jones were his menacing walk, his thick, dirty beard, his long mane of black hair--and his teeth. The front teeth, on top and bottom, were missing altogether, and next to the gaping holes were canine teeth that protruded from his mouth, almost like fangs. When he was sitting on a bus reading the Bible or swaggering down a street muttering to himself, people either stared or turned away. A few of them called him names.
NEWS
October 31, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
The Wolfman is mad. And he says to Alan Cranston, "I'm gonna getcha." It all started when Robert Shrum and David Doak, who make TV commercials for Democratic Sen. Cranston's reelection campaign, were looking for one more ad to draw attention to the inconsistent stands that Cranston's Republican opponent, Rep. Ed Zschau, has taken on some issues. Why not "Ed Zschau's greatest flip-flops?" they mused as they brainstormed late one night in Washington.
SPORTS
January 21, 1986 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Fans at the San Diego Sports Arena used to cheer wildly when former Socker defender Eric Geyer, known hereabouts as "The Wolfman," mixed it up with opposing players against the sideboards. That was when Geyer was commiting fouls, not calling them. He is now a referee, wearing a whistle instead of dreading the sound of one. And those cheers have turned to boos. In San Diego's recent home exhibition game against Schalke 04, Geyer was booed for calling a foul against Socker forward Steve Zungul.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Co.'s acquisition of Marvel Entertainment gave it the Hulk, Iron Man and other superheroes to fuel summer blockbusters for years to come. It also got Ike Perlmutter. Marvel's chief executive is hardly a household name. But Disney's purchase of the comic book publisher made Perlmutter one of the largest individual shareholders in the entertainment conglomerate, giving him special powers all his own. Superheroes are big business in Hollywood, accounting for three of the top-grossing films in the U.S. this year: Marvel's"The Avengers,""The Dark Knight Rises" and"The Amazing Spider-Man.
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